Category: ihvxbtht

Teaching the teachers

first_imgThey’re the sort of questions that keep public health officials up at night. How can the health care system balance the rights of someone with a potentially deadly disease against the rights of the public? Can the sick be detained, or even jailed, to avoid or limit outbreaks?They’re also the questions students in one global health class at Harvard are working to answer. As a teaching fellow (TF) looks on, students work in small groups to address the case of an American tourist who knew he’d been infected with drug-resistant tuberculosis, but insisted on flying from Rome to the United States, against the orders of public health officials.Despite appearances, the scene is not playing out in a regular classroom. Instead, it’s taking place at the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning. Called micro-teaching, each “class” is actually made up of teaching fellows, each of whom takes a turn at the head of the class, followed by a discussion with Bok Center staff and experienced teaching fellows about what parts of their lesson worked, and how they might improve.Established to enhance the quality of undergraduate education in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS), the center annually hosts dozens of programs, seminars, and events that bolster the teaching and learning priorities articulated by FAS Dean Michael D. Smith, John H. Finley Jr. Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences.“I’ve used the resources of the Bok Center since was I graduate student,” said Evelynn M. Hammonds, dean of Harvard College and Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and of African and African American Studies. “The teaching techniques and good advice I got there have stayed with me all these many years, especially the invaluable lessons about teaching sections.”“For me, the Bok Center is absolutely critical,” Donner Professor of Science John Huth said. “I don’t know where I’d be if it weren’t for their feedback and help. It’s tremendously important to have a resource like that if you really care about your teaching, because no matter how intrinsically good you are, they can make you better.”Huth came to Harvard in 1993, following five years conducting research at the Fermi National Accelerator Lab, and sought out the Bok Center for assistance with his lectures because, he said, “I felt like I was bombing.” Their solution was to videotape a lecture and have him to view it with center staff.“Just 10 minutes of filming and sitting down with the staff there for 30 minutes vastly improved my lectures,” he said. “To this day, I remember the tips they suggested to me, and I still practice many of those same habits.”Huth regularly turns to the center with a variety of questions. Most recently, he worked closely with staff to develop his popular “Primitive Navigation” class, and he insists that all teaching fellows in his courses take part in at least one micro-teaching session before the start of the year to ensure they have some experience leading a class.Caroline Light, lecturer on studies of women, gender, and sexuality and director of studies, stumbled onto the Bok Center four years ago, while searching for information about creating multimedia assignments. She has tapped the staff’s expertise many times since.“Looking back, I wish it was one of the first places I had gone to when I landed at Harvard,” Light said. “Certainly, I feel as though I’m a much better teacher than I was before encountering the Bok Center, but I’ve also discovered it has been a wonderful resource, in my role as director of studies, to direct our visiting faculty to for support.”Though it may be more widely recognized as a resource for graduate students and teaching fellows at the start of their classroom career, the Bok Center has much to offer to those, like Light, who have more experience in the classroom.As an example, Light cited an assignment in which students created their own version of “makeover” reality shows as a reflection on the complexities of contemporary citizenship. Before giving the assignment to her students, however, she had extensive conversations with Bok Center staff on how to make the assignment more interesting to students, as well as how to ensure they understood what was expected of them, how to get help if they needed it, and what she wanted them to learn.“Students today are so ensconced in media and have access to resources that I never dreamed of when I was an undergrad,” she said. “The question for me is: How can I adapt my pedagogical approach to these changing conditions? I have to learn to be more creative so my students will find it more challenging and interesting to learn from me.”“The Bok Center is an invaluable resource for all those involved in undergraduate teaching,” Smith said. “Whether it is helping faculty members enrich their classes with new materials, methods, and technologies, researching innovative pedagogies and assessment tools, or notifying faculty of important developments in higher education instruction, the Bok Center continues to offer and develop core programs and services that foster the fundamentals of good teaching. Harvard’s faculty bring extraordinary creativity and zest to the development of new courses for undergraduates, and the support they receive from the Bok Center plays a critical role in that work.”To underscore the importance of that support, this fall Smith is launching a search for the Richard L. Menschel Faculty Director of the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning. Together with the executive director of the center and his colleagues, the faculty director will be responsible for articulating the teaching mission of FAS and elevating its profile on campus, as well as managing the center’s growth and collaborating with staff to develop programs and courses on innovative pedagogies, course and programmatic assessment, and development of teaching skills among FAS instructors.As a way for teaching fellows to hone their skills and to ease their nervousness before stepping into a Harvard classroom, micro-teaching sessions are a valuable tool, but they’re only part of what the center does. It also sponsors conferences on teaching in the fall and winter, and offers services that range from videotaping classes for faculty to holding workshops on teaching in English for international teaching fellows and faculty. Each year it recognizes outstanding teachers with certificates of excellence.Now in the final year of work on her Ph.D. in human evolutionary biology, Katie McAuliffe first came to the Bok Center four years ago to attend a two-day introductory seminar for new teaching fellows. Over the years, she has taken part in micro-teaching, relied on the center to interpret midsemester feedback from students, and had an entire class videotaped to improve her teaching.“One important message I got from the Bok Center early on was that I was doing a better job than I thought I was doing,” she said. “For instance, when you’re teaching and you ask a question and wait for a response, typically a TF will wait for about one second for an answer, and they think, ‘Oh my God, no one is answering it!’ But when I saw myself on video, I realized that I could have waited much longer for an answer. I also realized that my section was actually going much better than I thought, and I don’t know what I was so stressed about.”McAuliffe’s experience at the center has been so positive that, as head teaching fellow in several classes, she encouraged other fellows to take part in programs — particularly micro-teaching — as a way to gauge whether they may need additional support over the course of the semester.“The Derek Bok Center does so much to support teaching’s central role in our mission,” said Allan M. Brandt, dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. “Teaching closes the circle from one generation of students and scholars to the next. Great teaching is at the core of what makes Harvard great. So it is critical that this community respect, and nurture, and honor great teaching.“I have always said that our graduate students are not just excellent scholars; they are some of the best teachers at Harvard,” Brandt added. “Through their teaching, our graduate students make vital contributions to the outstanding educational experience offered by Harvard College to its undergraduates. Our best graduate student teachers, the ones nominated each term for the Bok Center’s teaching awards, are innovative in their lesson planning, their classroom style, and their embrace of technology, and they are devoted to finding creative ways to elucidate the toughest concepts. The Bok Center supports them in all of that.”“We are at a turning point in how we think about teaching and learning,” said Terry Aladjem, executive director of the center and a lecturer on social studies. “We have wonderful scholars at Harvard who are the leaders in their fields, but as a University we haven’t yet engaged as fully as we might in a common discussion about teaching. I believe faculty members are eager to have that conversation, and our role is to become a place where that conversation can happen.”last_img read more

read more

Darren Criss, Aaron Tveit, Lea Salonga, Laura Osnes & More to Headline Elsie Fest

first_imgGreat White Way favorite Darren Criss, who recently finished his Broadway.com Audience Choice Award-winning run as the star of Hedwig and the Angry Inch, is launching an outdoor music festival for fans of Broadway. The first-ever Elsie Fest, named after Sally Bowles’ roomie, will take place on September 27 at 2PM in New York City.“I was at Coachella and thought ‘let’s do this for show tunes,’” said Criss in a statement. Broadway producer and Jujamcyn Theaters President Jordan Roth, who is also behind the event, added: “Elsie Fest will give us all a totally unique experience to come together to celebrate the music we love, the performers we love, and the community we love.”Criss will headline the concert alongside Aaron Tveit, Lea Salonga and Laura Osnes. Also appearing are Hamilton star Leslie Odom Jr., StarKid, Seth Rudetsky and many more special guests.Promising tunes from the stage and screen, Elsie Fest will take place on Pier 97 on the West Side Highway at 57th Street. The legendary Greenwich Village piano bar Marie’s Crisis, which Criss is known to frequent (sometimes with Salonga), will host a beer garden and food trucks will also be on hand.Tickets, which range from $50 to $250, are available at ElsieFest.com. Laura Osnes Star Files View Comments Darren Crisslast_img read more

read more

2020’s top cyber threats in banking

first_imgCSI recently polled banking executives from around the country, representing 227 financial institutions from across the asset-size spectrum to uncover their top strategies for the coming year. The data from this survey was then collected and used to create an executive report to help bankers get a pulse on the industry’s hot topics and strategies.According to the survey, bankers seem ready for cyber threats, rating themselves 3.7/5 in cybersecurity readiness.While it’s encouraging that institutions feel so confident about their cybersecurity readiness, at the same time, it’s concerning. Experts warn that, as fast as institutions get a grip on the latest hacking techniques and install preventative measures, cyber criminals adjust and adapt.Assessing 2020’s Top Cybersecurity ThreatsThe 2020 Banking Priorities Survey delved deep into cybersecurity threats to gauge bankers’ understanding of this continuously evolving risk and asked what is the greatest cybersecurity threat to your bank in 2020? continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

read more

CUInsight Minute with Lauren Culp – March 6, 2020

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Lauren Culp Lauren Culp is the Publisher & CEO at CUInsight.com.She leads the growing team at CUInsight, works with organizations serving credit unions to maximize their brand and exposure, connects … Web: https://www.cuinsight.com Details Welcome to the CUInsight Minute, sixty seconds from our Publisher & CEO Lauren Culp with the top three of our favorite things from the week.Mentioned this week:Growth in the digital era requires bold leadershipby SAMANTHA PAXSON, CO-OP FINANCIAL SERVICESHow often do you engage with all of the different companies you do business with from your phone? I’ll bet you do it all-day long. With the advent of the smartphone, we have all become empowered consumers, aggregating all of the different things we need to do in our financial life into a suite of apps on our mobile phones. (read more)An easy way your credit union can help veteransby ANTHONY HERNANDEZ, DEFENSE CREDIT UNION COUNCILServing those who serve our country is a deep commitment to proudly serve our nation’s military, veterans, and their families. It is a commitment every credit union in the United States shares as military members are included in virtually all fields of membership. (read more)It’s Better to Avoid a Toxic Employee than Hire a Superstarby NICOLE TORRES, HBRSuperstar employees are the obsession of the corporate world. They’re highly sought after, given the most attention and the best opportunities, generously rewarded, and expressly reassured after setbacks. (read more)last_img read more

read more

Best True Wireless Earphones You Can Buy [November 2020]

first_imgBest under Rs. 10,000: Lypertek TeviIf you haven’t heard of Lypertek before, we’re not surprised. This small and relatively unknown brand is making waves in audiophile circles with the Tevi, its first pair of true wireless earphones. Priced at Rs. 6,999, the Lypertek Tevi is our current top pick of true wireless earphones priced under Rs. 10,000, thanks to the balanced and natural sound on offer.Much of the credit for the good sound quality goes to support for the aptX Bluetooth codec, along with excellent tuning that favours detail over excessive thump and power. The resulting sound is clean, enjoyable, and as natural as you can expect on a pair of earphones priced under Rs. 10,000. Apart from delivering excellent sound quality, the Lypertek Tevi looks decent, has great battery life, and is IPX7 rated for water resistance, making this perhaps the best all-round pair of true wireless earphones you can buy right now. If your budget is lower than Rs. 10,000, there isn’t a better true wireless headset you can buy than the Lypertek Tevi right now.Buy: Lypertek TeviBest true wireless earphones for battery life: Samsung Galaxy Buds+While true wireless earphones are extremely convenient, battery life is still a bit of a pain point; the small size of the earphones makes it hard to put large enough batteries into them. However, Samsung appears to have made some progress on this front with the Galaxy Buds+. The successor to last year’s Galaxy Buds, these earphones also happen to be the best option to buy if you own a modern Samsung smartphone, thanks to support for the Scalable Bluetooth codec. Improvements in the drivers makes this an excellent sounding headset for ₹ 13,990.samsung galaxy buds plus review open case With the earbuds offering an impressive 11 hours of use per charge in our testing, the Samsung Galaxy Buds+ is the only headset in our list capable of true all-day, uninterrupted listening. The charging case offers just one additional top-up to the earphones, but this is entirely acceptable given the long run the earphones themselves are capable of.Buy: Samsung Galaxy Buds+ Our favourite true wireless headset you can buy today is the Apple AirPods Pro. Yes, it’s expensive at ₹ 24,900. However, for that price, you get features and sound quality that, in our opinion, are unmatched in the segment. The AirPods Pro is a big improvement over previous AirPods and competing headsets, thanks to one big feature – active noise cancellation. This makes the headset a lot more useful than most other true wireless options, and improves your ability to hear the sound even in the noisiest of environments. There’s also Transparency mode, which lets in outside and ambient sound in the most natural sounding way we’ve heard on any earphones to date. We found the sound to be engaging, immersive, and clean.Much of the improvements in these earphones can be credited to the in-ear fit, which makes for better noise isolation and a more immersive listening experience. The AirPods Pro is also incredibly flexible, and is able to adjust to different tracks on the fly for a comfortable, yet entertaining sound. As expected, the AirPods are meant to be used with Apple devices and work best if you have an iPhone or iPad. That isn’t to say they won’t work on Android smartphones or computers, but certain features will only work with an Apple iOS device. But regardless of what device you use it with, the AirPods Pro is an easy and engaging pair of true wireless earphones.Buy: AirPods Pro- Advertisement – Up until the advent of true wireless technology, wireless headphones and earphones have had some kind of connector between the left and right channels, be it a wire or a headband. With true wireless earphones, even this short cable is gone, and each earbud features its own battery, DAC, amplifier and Bluetooth chip. The earbuds individually connect to the source device, or a dominant earbud that is connected to the source then also connects with the second earbud to provide the digital signal.This way, each earphone is able to work independently, yet the two function together to ensure that the listener gets stereo sound output from the source device. The obvious advantage of this arrangement is the convenience of a completely wire-free listening experience, which improves comfort and ease of use. This is a boon in many usage scenarios, including while working out, in crowded places, on your commute, or when you want to use your earphones while lying down.True wireless earphones often also include built-in microphones, which makes it possible to use them as hands-free devices with your smartphone. Provided the microphones are good enough to pick up sound over a slightly longer distance, this makes true wireless earphones the most discreet and effective way to have call conversations on the move. And while the additional components may make the earbuds a bit heavier than typical earphones, many new options have compact, light-weight designs that are comfortable and don’t rely on winged tips or ear hooks to stay in place in your ears.Best true wireless earphones: Apple AirPods Pro- Advertisement – As we get well into 2020, the true wireless earphones segment has seen some big launches. Although Apple hasn’t launched anything new since the AirPods Pro, other brands such as Sennheiser and Sony have been hard at work. Apart from the high-profile launches, we’ve also seen affordable players such as Xiaomi enter the space in India, as well as some impressive options from brands such as JVC, Huawei, OnePlus, Vivo, and Realme, to name a few.Although there’s definitely demand for high-end products, we’ve seen some big shifts in the affordable and mid-range segments as well. We have a new top pick in the mid-range segment, and some noteworthy new entrants in the premium space as well. Read on to find out what our current top picks are when it comes to the true wireless earphones space in India.How do true wireless earphones work?- Advertisement – – Advertisement –center_img Best true wireless earphones under Rs. 5,000: Oppo Enco W51Priced at Rs. 4,999, the Oppo Enco W51 is our new top pick in this price segment for one big reason – functional active noise cancellation on true wireless earphones at a previously unimaginable price. Although the quality of the active noise cancellation is nowhere near as good as you’d get with more expensive options, it’s good enough to make the listening experience a bit cleaner and easier. oppo enco w51 review in case 2 Interestingly, you also get Qi wireless charging for the case, IP54 dust and water resistance, and sound quality that is cohesive, energetic, and detailed. The Oppo Enco W51 earphones are also comfortable and pretty good for voice calls. Although slightly let down by average battery life and strange touch controls, the pros largely outweigh the cons with the Oppo Enco W51. This is the true wireless headset you should buy if you’re on a tight budget. Best under ₹ 15,000: Jabra Elite 75tDanish audio manufacturer Jabra is best known for its professional audio headsets, but its consumer range is equally good and often underrated. One of its newest products in India is the Jabra Elite 75t, which is a premium true wireless headset priced at ₹ 14,999.Although the Jabra Elite 75t doesn’t quite match the AirPods Pro, it does give the regular AirPods (2nd Gen) a run for their money thanks to a more secure in-canal fit. There’s no aptX or LDAC Bluetooth codec support, but AAC means the sound will be good enough regardless of what source device you use. The sonic signature is bass-heavy, but the sound is clear, crisp, and very enjoyable. As with other Jabra products, voice call quality is excellent on the Jabra Elite 75t, making this one of the best pairs of true wireless earphones to own if you spend a lot of time on the phone.jabra elite 75t review case open Although the Jabra Elite 75t didn’t have active noise cancellation at launch, the company has impressively managed to roll out the feature through a software update. This makes the Jabra Elite 75t among the best true wireless earphones you can buy for less than Rs. 15,000, giving options such as the Samsung Galaxy Buds Live and Sony WF-1000XM3 strong competition in the sub-Rs. 15,000 price segment.Buy: Jabra Elite 75t How we picked the best true wireless earphonesWe’ve reviewed or used a wide range of true wireless headphones, including popular options from major electronics manufacturers, as well as options from traditional audio brands that have been in the business of making headphones and earphones for many years. We also took into account specifications, codec support and price to come up with our top recommendations.True wireless earphones form a relatively new product segment, and we’ve had a chance to test most of the new options. Apart from the earphones themselves, we’ve also paid attention to the charging cases that come with these options. The cases usually offer additional battery backup, and also make for a convenient and safe way to carry your earphones when not in use. With all of these points in mind, we’ve selected our list of top recommendations, as well as other options to look out for as listed below.Also consider these true wireless earphonesHuawei Freebuds 3i: Priced at ₹ 9,990, the recently launched Huawei Freebuds 3i is one of the most affordable true wireless earphones to come with active noise cancellation. The three-microphone system also promises better performance on voice calls.Xiaomi Mi True Wireless Earphones 2: Xiaomi’s first pair of true wireless earphones in India is impressive and good at just about everything. Priced at ₹ 3,999, it faces tough competition in the affordable segment, though.Sony WF-1000XM3: At ₹ 20,000, Sony’s flagship WF-1000XM3 offers the absolute best active noise cancellation you can find on a pair of true wireless earphones. Sound quality is good, but not quite as good as what Apple and Sennheiser have to offer.Realme Buds Air Pro: Realme’s latest true wireless earphones are also its most impressive yet, offering active noise cancellation, app support, and good sound for less than Rs. 5,000. Although not quite as good as the Oppo Enco W51, this is a solid pair of earphones for the price nonetheless.Sennheiser Momentum True Wireless 2: If you have an Android smartphone to take advantage of the aptX Bluetooth codec, this is the absolute best-sounding pair of true wireless earphones that you can buy right now. It’s expensive, though, at ₹ 24,990.Creative Outlier Air: At ₹ 6,999, this is our second-favourite pick priced under Rs. 10,000, edged out by the Lypertek Tevi. It’s still a very good pair of earphones, but the charging case feels a bit old-fashioned.Buying a budget TV online? We discussed how you can pick the best one, on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below. Affiliate links may be automatically generated – see our ethics statement for details. Ali Pardiwala Ali Pardiwala writes about audio and video devices for Gadgets 360 out of Mumbai, and has covered the industry for a decade now. Ali is a Senior Reviewer for Gadgets 360, where he has regularly written about televisions, home entertainment, and mobile gaming as well. He is a firm believer in 4K and HDR on televisions, and believes that true wireless earphones are the future of the personal audio industry. Ali is available on Twitter as @AliusPardius and on email at [email protected]ndtv.com, so do send in …More last_img read more

read more

Croatia is the fourth in the world after the departure of the educated

first_imgCroatia ranks fourth in the world on this infamous scale, and Haiti, Venezuela and BiH are in a worse situation. Also on the scale below Croatia are Romania, Yemen, Moldova, Northern Macedonia and Serbia. But let’s get back to the topic. Croatia is the fourth in the world after the departure of the educated “Brain drain” (brain drain) is a specific form of population migration that refers to the departure of highly educated professionals, scientists and intellectuals of a country abroad. Logical, brain drain it occurs from underdeveloped or developing countries to developed countries. When we talk about human resources in tourism as well as the burning issue of the workforce in our tourism, a big “fight” is being waged and how to attract and retain existing staff in middle and senior management. A topic that is little talked about in public, and which is also extremely important and more than current. In a 4-star hotel where high quality of service is expected, and accompanied by a “high” price of accommodation, the receptionist can not work for a salary of 5.500 kuna, without knowing two or three foreign languages, has extensive experience, high communication skills etc.… One with the other just doesn’t go. Quality tourism, the future and sustainability are not built on labor imports. The Economist magazine, using data from the World Economic Forum (WEF) according to the Global Competitiveness (WEF) report for 2018, published on its LinkedIn profile an infographic listing the countries where brain drain occurs most. The future is not built on the import of labor, and without domestic labor there is no sustainable development  In Germany March 01, 2020 new laws for skilled labor come into force in That is why a new law has been passed which expands the possibilities for qualified professionals from countries outside the European Union to come to Germany for employment.center_img Germany is chronically short of skilled workers / Croatian citizens in Austria will be able to find employment without a work permit Since the beginning of July, Austria has been opening its doors to work and the restriction on the Austrian labor market has been lifted for Croatian citizens. Until now, workers from Croatia did not have full open access to the Austrian labor market and it is almost impossible to get a work permit in Austria today, but now everything is changing. From 1 July all Croatian citizens in Austria will be able to find employment without a work permit. With that date, Germany will be able to immigrate not only skilled workers and professionals, but also those who would be employed there according to their qualifications. And as we all know, it has been happening in Croatia for a couple of years, where a good part of the citizens moved to some other countries, looking for a brighter future, even though they had their housing and business issues resolved. However, they were not satisfied with the quality of life in Croatia, not with the opportunities for professional growth and development, with the general state of society, ie they did not see their future and perspective in Croatia. The reasons are many, and the facts are exact. It will be more than interesting to follow the Census to be held in 2021, especially since unofficial estimates say that Croatia’s population has fallen below 4,000.000. Source: The Economist, If we want to build tourism on quality, we also need quality workers, and they, as in any sector, cost money.  The borders are open and the law of the market is simple.last_img read more

read more

Biden slams Trump for ‘walking away’ as pandemic ravaged US

first_imgTopics : With the economy in shambles after pandemic-related lockdowns, Biden said again that the only way to get back on track was to bring the virus under control.He vowed to heed scientific advice on the pandemic — even if that would mean shutting the country down once more.Biden slammed the segment of Americans who cite their “freedom” as they still resist wearing masks, despite evidence suggesting such barriers are one of the best ways to break transmission of COVID-19. Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden said Sunday he blames Donald Trump for “walking away” as COVID-19 ravaged the country, in a televised interview alongside running mate Kamala Harris on the eve of the Republican convention.The president, who is trailing Biden in polls, has been heavily criticized for his response to the pandemic, during which he has pushed for lockdown restrictions to be lifted early, been hesitant to embrace face masks, touted treatments not supported by medical experts and insisted the virus will just “disappear.””I don’t blame him for the current crisis,” Biden told ABC as the US neared 5.7 million infections and 177,000 deaths, by far the most in absolute terms of any country in the world. “I blame him for walking away and not dealing with solutions.”center_img ‘Watch me, Mr. President’ It’s “the first time I’ve ever heard people say that doing something patriotic, you can save other people’s lives, impacts on their freedom,” he said.The former vice president also responded to repeated attacks by Trump on his mental acuity, admitting that it was a “legitimate question to ask whether anybody over 70 years old” is fit for the presidency.But the 77-year-old added: “Watch me, Mr President, watch me. Look at us both… what kind of shape we’re in.”Questions have repeatedly been raised over 74-year-old Trump’s own health, and he has previously claimed he “aced” a cognitive test that he said proves he has the mental stamina to lead.The joint interview with Biden and Harris aired the night before the beginning of the Republican National Convention, during which Trump is seeking to recover momentum in his uphill re-election struggle.Republicans were set to gather after the Democrats held their own convention last week, during which they accused the president of being a divisive and incompetent leader who, in the words of former first lady Michelle Obama, “cannot meet this moment.”During the interview, Harris, the first woman of color on a major party political ticket, also defended Biden’s record on race as the US faces a reckoning over its treatment of black people and other minorities.”Joe… actually knows how to say the words ‘Black Lives Matter,'” Harris said.Trump, in contrast, “has never spoken those words and will never speak those words,” she said.last_img read more

read more

Nordic roundup: Sustainable Value Creation, Folksam, KLP, Oslo

first_imgSome 10% of firms had linked sustainability goals to remuneration or bonuses for management, the poll showed.However, a quarter of companies were revealed to be doing no monitoring of direct suppliers and 30% to 35% said they only carried out basic internal controls.Nadine Viel Lamare, spokesperson for the investor project, said: “It is cheering to see that more and more companies are working strategically on sustainability questions.”The results of the latest questionnaire showed that this was even true for many medium-sized companies, she said.“In the globalised economy that the companies are operating in, however, it is worrying that there is not enough control over suppliers,” she said.Elsewhere, the pensions business of Swedish insurer Folksam doulbed its investment returns last year compared to 2015, to 8.4% from 3.7%.All asset classes contributed positively to the 2016 return, Folksam said in its annual report, but equities and real estate had given particularly high returns at 15.1% and 21.9% respectively.Assets under management at Folksam Liv rose to SEK176.2bn (€18.6bn) by the end of December 2016, from SEK164.5bn a year before.Solvency increased to 165% from 162%.Premiums fell, though, to SEK9.8bn in 2016 from SEK13.5bn in 2015, which the company put down to a planned continued slowing of one-off premiums following changes it introduced during 2015 to the traditional life insurance business. Different rates of return were applied to new and old capital pools in order to safeguard long-term, stable returns for customers.KPA Pension, a subsidiary of Folksam, made a 6.7% return on investments last year, according the to report, up from 3.7% in 2015.Total assets rose to SEK148.4bn at the end of December from SEK132.3bn.In Norway, public sector pensions provider KLP released its annual results, showing an increase in its return on capital to a value-adjusted 5.8%, up from 4% in 2015.Total group assets grew to NOK596bn (€67.6bn), up from NOK543bn at the end of 2015.KLP said high returns on its equity and property investments were the biggest contributors to profit in 2016.Sverre Thornes, KLP’s group chief executive, said: “With such high returns we are able to give our customers more than NOK4bn of the profit to their premium fund, while at the same time further improving our solvency [so] we can maintain a higher level of premium than the currently low interest rates would suggest.”KLP said it had seen substantial growth over the past few years in the number of new customers in its public sector occupational pension.“Even though the situation in the public sector occupational pension market is perceived to be stable, the ongoing municipal reform could impact on KLP’s customer base,” it cautioned, adding that the company was following developments closely.In the corporate segment, KLP said it was seeing increased interest in the transition from public sector occupational pensions to defined contribution pensions within the corporate market.“KLP wants to be a good provider to these customers and is pleased that more and more companies are picking KLP for their defined contribution pension schemes,” it said.Separately, Oslo Pensjonsforsikring (OPF), Norway’s largest municipal pension fund, reported a rise in investment returns to 5.3% for 2016.Infrastructure produced the highest return out of all asset classes last year, generating 12.5%, with the whole real assets portfolio producing 8.3% in returns. Real estate on its own made an 8% return in 2016.Real assets made up 22.8% of OPF’s collective portfolio at the end of December.Fixed income, which accounts for 51.5% of the collective portfolio, ended the year with a 3.4% return, and equities – which have a 25.6% weighting in the collective portfolio – made 6.5% for the fundThe company’s group profit fell to NOK732m (€83m) last year from NOK1.19bn in 2015. Assets under management climbed to NOK83.9bn at the end of December from NOK79.6bn the year before.OPF provides pensions for public sector employees in Norway’s capital city. Sweden’s biggest pension funds have helped promote sustainable business practices among locally-listed companies through joint efforts on engagement, according to a survey.A joint venture between 17 of Sweden’s largest investors in cooperation with the Nasdaq Stockholm, called Sustainable Value Creation (Hållbart värdeskapande), was set up in 2009 and has had a significant impact on Swedish publicly-quoted companies’ sustainability work, the survey said.The joint venture includes the four main buffer funds (AP1, AP2, AP3, AP4) as well as AMF, Alecta, Folksam, and Länsförsäkringar.Sustainable Value Creation’s third survey of companies confirmed that the work had resulted in more than 85% of companies having processes to identify opportunities as well as risks related to sustainability. This was an increase of around five percentage points since 2009.last_img read more

read more

Female teacher jailed for 10 years for sexually violating boy

first_imgNZ Herald 27 November 2015A female teacher who sexually violated and manipulated a boy was no better than male predators who abused girls, a court heard today.Stacey Reriti was sentenced to more than 10 years in jail for her exploitation of a boy who was only 10 when the offending started in 2011.She was found guilty last month on six charges of sexual violation by unlawful sexual connection and one charge of doing an indecent act on a minor.At her sentencing today, the High Court at Wellington heard the boy felt betrayed, and his entire family felt Reriti’s actions would be “a scar” on their lives forever.Reriti used to teach at Natone Park School in Porirua.Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.Prosecutor Dale LaHood today said aggravating features of Reriti’s offending included the “vulnerability” of the victim.A conservative lobby group welcomed the sentence but said rape laws should be updated to remove the “gender inequality” which prevented Reriti from being charged with rape.“This sentence sends a strong message that gross breaches of trust will receive the full weight of the law,” said Bob McCoskrie, Family First national director.“However, we would question what mitigating circumstances existed which allowed the sentence to be reduced from the prosecutor’s starting point of 14-15 years. This offending was calculated and manipulative,” Mr McCoskrie added.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11552211last_img read more

read more

State Farm To Host Document Shredding Event

first_imgPaul Ehrman State Farm Insurance will hosting a shredding event for the community on Saturday between 9 a.m. and 12 p.m. at 1750 S.R. 46 E in Batesville.Over 16 million people, representing 7 percent of all persons age 16 or older in the United States, experienced at least one incident of identity theft in 2012, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) announced last year.Outside trash containers and dumpsters can become a place for criminals to steal your private information, such as copies of your checks, credit card or bank statements, or other records that typically bear your name, address, and even your telephone number.These types of records make it easier for criminals to get control over accounts in your name and assume your identity.A local shredding event can serve as an opportunity to dispose personal documents securely.last_img read more

read more