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These are the two FTSE 100 dividend stocks I bought in April 2020

first_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares James J. McCombie | Wednesday, 22nd April, 2020 | More on: BATS PZC Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Image source: Getty Images. Cussons is now focusing on its core personal care and beauty brands. Shedding a Nigerian dairy business and a small Polish personal care brand are cash-generating steps in the right direction. A new CEO, snatched from Avon with 21 years prior experience at Procter & Gamble, will help with the re-focus.As Wise Funds asset manager Philip Matthews has pointed out, there is optionality on the Nigerian business. The Nigerian economy either recovers, boosting the value of the business, or it does not. Cussons’ stock price reflects the latter option already. Either way, the stock offers an attractive yield of around 4.5% assuming no cuts, and the balance sheet is healthy. These are the two FTSE 100 dividend stocks I bought in April 2020 I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Enter Your Email Addresscenter_img Some FTSE 100 dividend-paying stocks look like absolute bargains at the moment. Here are two that I purchased recently, and a bonus one from the FTSE 250.Addictive dividendsThe popularity of reduced harm products, such as vaping devices, has hurt traditional smoking product sales. But, British American Tobacco (LSE: BATS) has been increasing its revenues by gobbling up market share.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential… See all posts by James J. McCombie The bulk of legal and regulatory battles concerning traditional tobacco products is in the past. The latest hit to the industry is the menthol ban in Europe and some states in the US. There is not much left to regulate now, short of an outright ban on tobacco sales, which is unlikely. Although the consensus view is that vaping is less harmful than inhaling burning tobacco, the absolute risks of reduced harm products are not well understood. However, the risks of cigarette smoking are well known and publicised.The market for vaping products is ripe for regulation. This means that smokers may be put off switching as the range of vaping products shrinks and becomes more expensive. Even if vaping use skyrockets, BAT has a compelling range of reduced harm products lined up.Dividends have grown consistently for BAT shareholders at 4% per year if you ignore the effects of the special dividend paid in 2017. I am confident that growth will continue. BAT recently announced that a biotech subsidiary is developing a potential coronavirus vaccine. BAT may get a reputational boost from this, but more importantly, it serves as a reminder of the level of scientific sophistication at big tobacco companies. If the reduced harm products do dominate, BAT has an edge in developing new products and proving their relative safety.It’s good to talkThe dividend yield on shares in BT Group has increased from a little under 3% to near 13% over five years, but don’t be fooled. The increasing yield came from the share price falling rather than dividend payouts soaring. However, I believe BT’s share price reflects the woes of recent years.BT Group can now get on with integrating EE, the mobile network it purchased in 2017, and fully capitalise on its position as the UK’s leading fixed-line and wireless network operator that also delivers content. You can read more about why I like BT here.Big brand betPZ Cussons sells its branded consumer staples across Europe and the Americas, Asia, and Africa. Profits have been trending lower since 2017, mainly due to Cussons’ portfolio of brands becoming bloated and its Nigerian business suffering in a weak economy. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. James J. McCombie owns shares in British American Tobacco, BT Group and PZ Cussons. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of PZ Cussons. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997”last_img read more

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Reporters Without Borders condemns restrictive accreditation system for local correspondents of

first_img to go further Follow the news on Algeria RSF_en Organisation Help by sharing this information AlgeriaMiddle East – North Africa February 24, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Reporters Without Borders condemns restrictive accreditation system for local correspondents of AlgeriaMiddle East – North Africa News Algeria : Reporter jailed after covering Tuareg protests in southern Algeria Receive email alertscenter_img News Algeria pressures reporters by delaying renewal of accreditation Harassment of Algerian reporters intensifies in run-up to parliamentary elections May 18, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders is concerned that the Ministry of Culture and Communications’ recent decision to limit accreditation of local journalists to a single foreign media outlet will threaten the foreign media’s ability to cover news in Algeria. A decree ratifying the new measure is expected to be adopted shortly.Reporters Without Borders has asked the Ministry of Culture and Communications to reconsider the measure and allow journalists to work for several foreign media outlets withoutrestrictions, as has been the custom in recent years. The organisation fears that the new measure may seriously hamper the work of correspondents for international media outlets. Reporters without Borders is also worried that the measure is partially aimed at limiting the reporting of Algerian news in the foreign press.While defending the restrictive measure, a ministry representative told Reporters Without Borders, “Inno country is a journalist allowed to work for several different media outlets. Correspondents must work exclusively for one media outlet.”For several years now, the Ministry of Culture and Communications’ Press and Accreditations Office has offered Algerian journalists the unrestricted option of working as correspondents for several foreign media outlets. An annualaccreditation was granted and was renewable upon request. Algerian journalists who work for the foreign press have not been issued their 2004 accreditation cards to date.According to Anis Rahmani, a journalist for the daily “El Khabar” and correspondent for the London-based newspaper “El Hayat” and Lebanese television station LBC, “This measure is aimed at suppressing news about Algerian events and avoiding international scrutiny. The step also represents a genuine threat for foreign media outlets. It is a calculated effort to limit their choice of correspondents in Algeria and stop them from working with those of their own choosing.”Haïthem Rabani, who works for seven different foreign media outlets, including the radio stations Voice of America and Deutsche Welle, expressed outrage over the newly-imposed restrictions. “The measure is likely to encourage newspaperand radio journalists to work under pseudonyms. Television journalists are most at risk. Because they have to send their reports via the studios of the national television station, they will not be able to use unofficial channels. Tapes of news reports may have to be sent out in the suitcases of grandmothers travelling abroad!”. News News May 12, 2021 Find out more April 29, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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United Nations – Further steps to enhance resolution 1738 needed more than ever

first_img Related documents protection_of_journalists_letter_to_unsc_members.pdfPDF – 1.82 MB Reporters Without Borders welcomes the United Nations Security Council interest in considering to take further steps to enhance the implementation of resolution 1738 and improve the protection of journalists on the ground. The Security Council is scheduled to hold an open debate on the protection of journalists on July 17, 2013. Reporters Without Borders worked very closely with France on the draft and adoption of resolution 1738 in 2006.“Since resolution 1738 was unanimously adopted by the Security Council condemning intentional attacks against journalists in conflict situations, the level of violence against journalists and citizen-journalists is increasing. With 89 journalists killed in connection with their work, 2012 has been the deadliest year for journalists since Reporters Without Borders began producing an annual roundup in 1995”, explains Christophe Deloire, Reporters Without Borders Executive Director. “Further steps to enhance the implementation of resolution 1738 are needed more than ever”.In repressive countries or countries at war, professional and citizen journalists are often the only sources of firsthand information about human rights violations by governments, warlords, religious extremists. By covering the plight of their fellow citizens and reporting abuses by leading officials, they expose themselves to the possibility of very violent reprisals. On the basis of its experience, Reporters Without Borders recommends that certain steps should be made in order to protect journalists.1. Establish effective monitoring for states’ respect of their obligations2. Extend member states’ obligations to non-professional “news providers”3. Extend member states’ obligations beyond armed conflict situations4. Reaffirm member states’ obligations to protect foreign exiled news providers Please find attached the note addressed to Member States.Resolution 1738 already requires states to protect journalists and combat impunity for those responsible for physical attacks against journalists. “So the problem is not a legal void but the lack of any verification of respect by member states for their obligations, highlights Christophe Deloire, that’s why we are especially asking the UN Security Council to seek the creation of a group of independent experts tasked with monitoring respect for UN Security Council Resolution 1738 by member states and presenting its findings during UNESCO general conferences. This group would also be tasked with informing, helping and advising the UN secretary general on the drafting of the section on the safety of journalists in his next reports on the protection of civilians during armed conflicts.”In most of the cases when journalists have been killed, the murderers stay unpunished. Reporters Without Borders urges again member states to investigate systematically all acts of violence or fatal incidents in which journalists, media workers and related personnel are the victims, both those that take place on their territory and those that take place abroad. An example of this is the investigation launched in France by the French prosecutor on the attack that killed the French photographer Remi Ochlik and seriously wounded the French journalist Edith Bouvier in Homs in February 2012. The American veteran journalist Marie Colvin died as well in this attack.Reporters Without Borders has been dedicated to the protection of journalists, media assistants and citizen journalists in conflict situations for more than 25 years, by providing insurances, bullet proof jackets and digital safety advises.Reporters Without Borders co-signed a letter addressed to all UN Security Council members states with FIDH – International Federation for Human Rights, Canadian Association of Journalists, Committee to Protect Journalists, Free Press Unlimited, Global Forum for Media Development, International Center for Journalists, International Media Support, International Press Institute, Internews and Rory Peck Trust. RSF_en Organisation News July 17, 2013 – Updated on January 25, 2016 United Nations – Further steps to enhance resolution 1738 needed more than ever Help by sharing this informationlast_img read more

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Newspaper editor freed, charged with “unlawful assembly”

first_img SeychellesAfrica Arson attack causes serious damage to opposition weekly’s press Help by sharing this information News Judicial harassment forces opposition weekly to stop publishing SeychellesAfrica Roger Mancienne, editor of the privately-owned weekly Regar and secretary-general of the opposition Seychelles National Party (SNP), told Reporters Without Borders he was released this morning after being held for nearly 24 hours in the central police barracks in Victoria.Like SNP leader Wavel Ramkalawan and Regar publisher Jean-François Ferrari, he has been charged with “unlawful assembly,” which is punishable by a fine of 500 rupees (77 euros). All three have been told to report to police headquarters on 10 October.“I was held in a dirty, stinking cell and I was only handcuffed when they took me to be interrogated or to have my fingerprints taken,” he told Reporters Without Borders. “I said to the police my rights had been violated and that I had committed no crime.”The SNP has called a news conference for this afternoon to give its account of the violent dispersal of yesterday’s demonstration outside parliament, which was called to demand an end to the state’s monopoly of radio and TV broadcasting.In its evening news programme yesterday, the state-owned Seychelles Broadcasting Corporation (SBC) just showed a few images of the demonstration and a long interview with the chief of police, giving “an erroneous version of the facts,” Mancienne said.“We will see where or not the SBC comes to our news conference to balance its coverage,” he said. “If it does not, it will prove the state media are controlled.”————03.10.2006 – Newspaper editor arrested, publisher injured when police disperse protest against state broadcast monopolyReporters Without Borders condemned the violent dispersal of an opposition demonstration in the Seychelles capital of Victoria today to demand an end to the state’s monopoly of radio and TV broadcasting. Roger Mancienne, the editor of the opposition weekly Regar, was arrested while Jean-François Ferrari, the newspaper’s publisher, was injured.“It is perfectly legitimate to demand an end to the state’s broadcasting monopoly and strict control of the public media,” the press freedom organisation said. “So it is incomprehensible that anti-riot police used violence against unarmed citizens who turned out in support of the opposition and journalists.”Reporters Without Borders added: “President James Michel’s government must admit that it is high time it peacefully relinquished its grip over news and information in Seychelles. And there was absolutely no valid reason for arresting Mancienne. He must be freed at once.”In today’s demonstration, several hundred supporters of the opposition Seychelles National Party (SNP) gathered outside parliament to hand in a petition calling for press freedom. The protest was prompted by parliament’s rejection of a SNP motion to amend the law banning political parties from setting up their own radio stations. The opposition is denied access to state radio and TV stations, even at election time, and the editorial policies of the public media are strictly controlled by the government.The communication minister looked on today as anti-riot police armed with guns and tear grenades stormed the site of the protest and beat opposition members and journalists who were present. Ferrari sustained head injuries and multiple fractures, his wife told Reporters Without Borders. He was taken to a hospital along with SNP chief Wavel Ramkalawan, whose condition was not immediately known. Mancienne, who is also the SNP’s secretary-general, was taken to police headquarters, where he is still being held.Regar and The New Seychelles Weekly are the only opposition media in Seychelles, which has draconian legislation on defamation and inaccurate news reports that is enforced by courts that are often very politicised. An arson attack on Regar’s printing press on the night of 8 December 2005 is still unpunished. October 26, 2006 Find out more News to go further Receive email alerts December 13, 2005 Find out more News RSF_en Roger Mancienne, editor of the privately-owned weekly Regar and secretary-general of the opposition Seychelles National Party (SNP), told Reporters Without Borders he was released this morning after being held for nearly 24 hours in the central police barracks in Victoria. Like SNP leader Wavel Ramkalawan and Regar publisher Jean-François Ferrari (photo), he has been charged with “unlawful assembly”. News December 9, 2004 Find out more Organisation Follow the news on Seychelles Heavy fine for ignoring court’s gag order could sink sole opposition newspaper October 4, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Newspaper editor freed, charged with “unlawful assembly”last_img read more

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Journalists censored, held in Sudan protests

first_img Covid-19 in Africa: RSF joins a coalition of civil society organizations to demand the release of imprisoned journalists on the continent Organisation April 10, 2020 Find out more News SudanAfrica Reporters Without Borders expresses its deep concern over the recent worsening condition of press freedom in Sudan. The country is already hostile to the work of journalists and seizures of journals and arrests of media professionals yesterday in connection with popular demonstrations raise fears of a major return of repression.“We condemn the wish of the Khartoum government to censor news by intimidating journalists and dissuading them from covering protest movements,” the press freedom body says.“As in Tunisia and Egypt the people, and in particular students, want to give voice to their yearning for freedom by shouting slogans such as ‘Revolution against dictatorship’. As in the case of neighboring Egypt the security forces have put down the movement with severity and have tried to prevent the media from reflecting these events.” Yesterday demonstrations were organized in several cities, in particular in Khartoum and Omdurman. They were initiated by social networks such as Facebook, where a group calling itself “January 30, a word to the sudanese youth” called for peaceful demonstrations. The protests demanded the end of “injustice and humiliation.” Drawing inspiration from the recent revolution in Tunisia and the uprisings under way in Egypt the demonstrators expressed their anger against the political, economic and social running of the country. Several dozen people were arrested, among them a number of journalists, including Hamza Baloul, correspondent of the Qatari newspaper Alsharq, Sarah Tag of the newspaper Alsahafa, Ali Haj Al-amin of Ajras Alhurrya, Hussein Khogali, editor of the daily Al-Wan, and Mohamed Amir Musa, from the Turkish news agency Al-ikhlas. A photographer working for Agence France-Presse (AFP) was held by the military for almost two hours and a dozen journalists were told not to cover the demonstrations. Some Internet sites were also blocked, in particular those calling for demonstrations. Overnight 30 January the dailies Alsahafa and Ajras Alhurrya were seized, preventing them from publishing the following morning. “Sudan, which already occupies 172nd place out of 178 in our world press freedom ratings, continues to confirm its role as bottom of the class in press freedom,” Reporters Without Borders said.“To be sure a diverse press does exist in Sudan but the moment it touches on sensitive subjects, repression is brutal. The demonstrators were protesting peacefully and the journalists who were arrested or prevented from doing their job were only carrying out their mission to inform. The authorities’ assertion that they were a threat to national security does not stand up.” The forthcoming partition of the country after the self-determination referendum in the south gives rise to many debates that the government wishes to crush. The referendum process was tarnished by some press freedom violations. Reporters Without Borders condemned recently the detention and charging of two journalists in the east of the country who risk the death penalty . The press freedom organization also recalls that five other journalists are at present in jail in Sudan: Gafar Alsabki Ibrahim, journalist with Alsahafa, held since 3 November 2010, Abdurrahman Adam, who works with Radio Dabanga, since 30 October 2010, and Abuser Al Amin, Ashraf Abdelaziz and Altahir Ibrahim (also known as Altahir Abugawhara), all three journalists working for the now-banned opposition daily Rai al-Chaab (The Opinion of the People), held since May 2010. to go further April 6, 2020 Find out more SudanAfrica News Follow the news on Sudan Coronavirus infects press freedom in Africa Sudan : Press freedom still in transition a year after Omar al-Bashir’s removal Help by sharing this information News Receive email alerts News January 31, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalists censored, held in Sudan protests RSF_en March 29, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Brundidge loses a cornerstone in Moultry

first_img But Moultry knew he could do more.“My dad said he believed the station could do more business if they started replacing brake shoes and water pumps,” Moultry said. “It did and that changed the business.”Punch Moultry went on to work at Johnson’s Garage and, with that added experience, he was ready to open his own business. In 1972, he got a Small Business Loan and, of the 72 loans that were approved in Pike County during that time, Moultry was the only one that paid his loan back in full, his son said.Punch Moultry bought land and borrowed a dump truck and hauled in the dirt to level the property for his service station.“He didn’t get a loan large enough to do what he wanted to do,” Moultry said. “He didn’t have enough money to put doors on the shop, so he took all the tools home a night until he could get money for the doors. It was a struggle but he worked hard and it paid off for him.”The Moultrys were honored with the Brundidge Business Association’s Business of the Year Award in 2015. They expressed appreciation for the local support that had enabled them to stay in business in Brundidge for more than 40 years. But for Punch Moultry, it was not all work and no play. He liked drag racing and was good enough at it that he won a few trophies.“He didn’t have the fastest car on the drag strip and he didn’t care about winning trophies or money, he just loved to race,” Moultry said. “He was known around the track as ‘Burnout Man,’ because he would burn so much rubber that you couldn’t see the car for the smoke. He loved drag racing and he loved his church, New Zion Baptist, and he loved Brundidge and he loved people.”Brundidge Mayor Isabell Boyd said Punch Moultry was a cornerstone of Brundidge for many years.“He was a kind and gentle person,” she said. “He was always willing to lend a helping hand to anybody that needed it. I never heard him say a negative thing about anybody. The work he did helped keep Brundidge on the move. People depended to him to keep their vehicles working. They trusted him and he never let anybody down. He will be missed but his influence will continue to play a role in the forward movement of Brundidge.” By Jaine Treadwell You Might Like Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBet You’re Pretty Curious About Jaden’s Net Worth Right About Now, HuhBradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Print Article James Albert “Punch Moultry (right) stands next to his son Willie Moultry after Moultry’s Service Center was named “Business of the Year” by the Brundidge Business Association in 2014. Brundidge loses a cornerstone in Moultry Latest Stories Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Sponsored Content James Albert “Punch” Moultry was the son of a sharecropper.Nothing came easy to him but that didn’t keep him from achieving his dreams and loving the life he lived.Moultry was one of those iconic small town characters that make life of others a bit more interesting and enjoyable while making the road ahead a little smoother.center_img Next UpAs word of Moultry’s death on Saturday spread around Brundidge so did the sadness.For as long as most people can remember, Moultry has been a part of the city’s scene, driving through town in his red pickup truck at 30 miles per our chewing on a cigar that he never lit.Steve Carter described his longtime friend as a “jolly good fellow.” “I’ve been knowing Punch since I was in high school and he worked at Johnson’s Garage,” Carter said. “He was always laughing, joking and picking at you. Punch was as good a man as you’ll ever find. He was the kind of man you were proud to call a friend. I thought the world of him.”Not even his son, Willie Moultry knows why hid dad was called Punch but most people in and around Brundidge know him by that name. And, probably most have enjoyed a light-hearted conversation with him at Moultry’s Service Center, 365 Barr Street in Brundidge. He “entertained” customers as only he could.Moultry was born south of Brundidge and life was a struggle for his family. He was no stranger to hard work and his first paying job was at a sawmill.“My dad could do a lot of things and, when the sawmill ran out of log work, he could do other things so he got more work than the other workers,” said Willie Moultry, who followed his dad into the auto repair business. “He left sawmill work and worked for Colin Sheffield at his station down on South Main Street. He washed cars, changed oil and pumped gas.” Published 9:12 am Tuesday, January 9, 2018 By The Penny Hoarder CLAY HILL CHRISTMAS: Historic church carries on tradition despite cold On a cold and windy January Saturday night, the 2017 Christmas season came to a quiet, peaceful and reverent close… read more Book Nook to reopen Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Email the author Troy falls to No. 13 Clemsonlast_img read more

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Vice Chancellor second highest paid in UK

first_imgIt has emerged that Professor Andrew Hamilton, Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University, is the second highest paid university boss in the country.In the year 2012-2013, the Vice-Chancellor received a pay-package of £434,000 – including pension – which is a 2.36 per cent increase on his 2011-12 salary.This news has sparked concern amongst those who are currently campaigning for higher wages for all of Oxford University’s academic staff.While Hamilton’s 2012-2013 pay increase of 2.36% was nearly in line with the inflation rate of the time (which was recorded at 2.9% in July 2013), academics were offered a far smaller wage increase.The President of the University and College Union in Oxford, Terry Hoad, who campaigns for higher wages for academics and helped organise two academic strikes last year, pointed out this discrepancy. Talking to Cherwell, he said, “The University and College Union is about to consider whether to accept a pay offer which would see a 1% increase for 2012-13 and 2% for 2013-14. That offer represents a further significant cut in the real-terms value of our members’ pay, losses which have been suffered annually for a long time.”He continued, “It is therefore galling that the already high salaries of vice-chancellors, including our own in Oxford – salaries that are many times higher than those of most other university staff – are increasing by very large amounts. It is not that redistributing the Vice-Chancellor’s pay increase among those other staff members would give them significant increases, but more that we are not seeing much sense of collegiality and even-handedness.”“Vice-Chancellors have demanding jobs, but all university staff share responsibility for the very important work of sustaining the teaching, learning, and research for which Oxford has such a distinguished record. The Oxford Magazine has looked to the Vice-Chancellor to take a lead in work to ensure ‘our well-being into the future as a world-class university founded on academic and democratic values’. Those values should surely include the principle of fair rewards for all those on whom that well-being depends.” However, the University of Oxford has said that the Vice-Chancellor’s salary is simply a reflection of the university’s wealth and global standing. A spokesperson for the university stated, “According to last year’s Times Higher World University Rankings, Oxford is the number one university in the UK and number two in the world. It is consistently ranked as one of the two best universities in the UK and among the handful of best universities in the world. Its research output is vast, it has an almost billion-pound-a-year turnover, not including the colleges and the Oxford University Press, and it has great institutional complexity. The Vice-Chancellor’s salary reflects that.”This view is not necessarily shared by Oxford students. A member of the Oxford Activist Network, Xavier Cohen, said he thought the example of the Vice-Chancellor’s pay was indicative of what he termed the ‘marketization of education’.He told Cherwell, “A democratically unaccountable and unelected technocrat takes charge and power away from the members of our university, when we have not asked them to, and frames this power in terms of a burdensome bureaucratic responsibility that they deserve tremendous remuneration for.”“The VC’s pay and power effectively takes pay and power away from the members of our institution, and to fight this means fighting the anti-democratic neoliberal rationality that it comes from.”Other students appear firmly in agreement with Cohen’s point. Katharine Baxter, Keble student and student activist in last year’s academic strikes, said, “In a year when striking staff have, effectively, been fined for participation in unionised industrial action it is unacceptable that Oxford Vice-Chancellor Andrew Hamilton is the second highest paid VC in the country.”An Oxford NUS delegate Nathan Akehurst added, “Vice-Chancellors’ salaries have risen by 8% in the last years whilst lecturers have faced the longest sustained pay cut since the Second World War. Pay distribution in HE (and in society in general) is unfair, which is why NUS voted to campaign for managers to be paid a maximum of five times the lowest-paid worker’s salary.”Despite receiving a pay-package which is just under three times larger than David Cameron’s salary of £142,500, Hamilton’s salary still falls short of that of the new director of the London School of Economics, Craig Calhoun.According to The Times Higher Education, Calhoun received £466,000 in 2012-2013, making him the highest paid university boss in the UK.last_img read more

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Teaching the teachers

first_imgThey’re the sort of questions that keep public health officials up at night. How can the health care system balance the rights of someone with a potentially deadly disease against the rights of the public? Can the sick be detained, or even jailed, to avoid or limit outbreaks?They’re also the questions students in one global health class at Harvard are working to answer. As a teaching fellow (TF) looks on, students work in small groups to address the case of an American tourist who knew he’d been infected with drug-resistant tuberculosis, but insisted on flying from Rome to the United States, against the orders of public health officials.Despite appearances, the scene is not playing out in a regular classroom. Instead, it’s taking place at the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning. Called micro-teaching, each “class” is actually made up of teaching fellows, each of whom takes a turn at the head of the class, followed by a discussion with Bok Center staff and experienced teaching fellows about what parts of their lesson worked, and how they might improve.Established to enhance the quality of undergraduate education in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS), the center annually hosts dozens of programs, seminars, and events that bolster the teaching and learning priorities articulated by FAS Dean Michael D. Smith, John H. Finley Jr. Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences.“I’ve used the resources of the Bok Center since was I graduate student,” said Evelynn M. Hammonds, dean of Harvard College and Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and of African and African American Studies. “The teaching techniques and good advice I got there have stayed with me all these many years, especially the invaluable lessons about teaching sections.”“For me, the Bok Center is absolutely critical,” Donner Professor of Science John Huth said. “I don’t know where I’d be if it weren’t for their feedback and help. It’s tremendously important to have a resource like that if you really care about your teaching, because no matter how intrinsically good you are, they can make you better.”Huth came to Harvard in 1993, following five years conducting research at the Fermi National Accelerator Lab, and sought out the Bok Center for assistance with his lectures because, he said, “I felt like I was bombing.” Their solution was to videotape a lecture and have him to view it with center staff.“Just 10 minutes of filming and sitting down with the staff there for 30 minutes vastly improved my lectures,” he said. “To this day, I remember the tips they suggested to me, and I still practice many of those same habits.”Huth regularly turns to the center with a variety of questions. Most recently, he worked closely with staff to develop his popular “Primitive Navigation” class, and he insists that all teaching fellows in his courses take part in at least one micro-teaching session before the start of the year to ensure they have some experience leading a class.Caroline Light, lecturer on studies of women, gender, and sexuality and director of studies, stumbled onto the Bok Center four years ago, while searching for information about creating multimedia assignments. She has tapped the staff’s expertise many times since.“Looking back, I wish it was one of the first places I had gone to when I landed at Harvard,” Light said. “Certainly, I feel as though I’m a much better teacher than I was before encountering the Bok Center, but I’ve also discovered it has been a wonderful resource, in my role as director of studies, to direct our visiting faculty to for support.”Though it may be more widely recognized as a resource for graduate students and teaching fellows at the start of their classroom career, the Bok Center has much to offer to those, like Light, who have more experience in the classroom.As an example, Light cited an assignment in which students created their own version of “makeover” reality shows as a reflection on the complexities of contemporary citizenship. Before giving the assignment to her students, however, she had extensive conversations with Bok Center staff on how to make the assignment more interesting to students, as well as how to ensure they understood what was expected of them, how to get help if they needed it, and what she wanted them to learn.“Students today are so ensconced in media and have access to resources that I never dreamed of when I was an undergrad,” she said. “The question for me is: How can I adapt my pedagogical approach to these changing conditions? I have to learn to be more creative so my students will find it more challenging and interesting to learn from me.”“The Bok Center is an invaluable resource for all those involved in undergraduate teaching,” Smith said. “Whether it is helping faculty members enrich their classes with new materials, methods, and technologies, researching innovative pedagogies and assessment tools, or notifying faculty of important developments in higher education instruction, the Bok Center continues to offer and develop core programs and services that foster the fundamentals of good teaching. Harvard’s faculty bring extraordinary creativity and zest to the development of new courses for undergraduates, and the support they receive from the Bok Center plays a critical role in that work.”To underscore the importance of that support, this fall Smith is launching a search for the Richard L. Menschel Faculty Director of the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning. Together with the executive director of the center and his colleagues, the faculty director will be responsible for articulating the teaching mission of FAS and elevating its profile on campus, as well as managing the center’s growth and collaborating with staff to develop programs and courses on innovative pedagogies, course and programmatic assessment, and development of teaching skills among FAS instructors.As a way for teaching fellows to hone their skills and to ease their nervousness before stepping into a Harvard classroom, micro-teaching sessions are a valuable tool, but they’re only part of what the center does. It also sponsors conferences on teaching in the fall and winter, and offers services that range from videotaping classes for faculty to holding workshops on teaching in English for international teaching fellows and faculty. Each year it recognizes outstanding teachers with certificates of excellence.Now in the final year of work on her Ph.D. in human evolutionary biology, Katie McAuliffe first came to the Bok Center four years ago to attend a two-day introductory seminar for new teaching fellows. Over the years, she has taken part in micro-teaching, relied on the center to interpret midsemester feedback from students, and had an entire class videotaped to improve her teaching.“One important message I got from the Bok Center early on was that I was doing a better job than I thought I was doing,” she said. “For instance, when you’re teaching and you ask a question and wait for a response, typically a TF will wait for about one second for an answer, and they think, ‘Oh my God, no one is answering it!’ But when I saw myself on video, I realized that I could have waited much longer for an answer. I also realized that my section was actually going much better than I thought, and I don’t know what I was so stressed about.”McAuliffe’s experience at the center has been so positive that, as head teaching fellow in several classes, she encouraged other fellows to take part in programs — particularly micro-teaching — as a way to gauge whether they may need additional support over the course of the semester.“The Derek Bok Center does so much to support teaching’s central role in our mission,” said Allan M. Brandt, dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. “Teaching closes the circle from one generation of students and scholars to the next. Great teaching is at the core of what makes Harvard great. So it is critical that this community respect, and nurture, and honor great teaching.“I have always said that our graduate students are not just excellent scholars; they are some of the best teachers at Harvard,” Brandt added. “Through their teaching, our graduate students make vital contributions to the outstanding educational experience offered by Harvard College to its undergraduates. Our best graduate student teachers, the ones nominated each term for the Bok Center’s teaching awards, are innovative in their lesson planning, their classroom style, and their embrace of technology, and they are devoted to finding creative ways to elucidate the toughest concepts. The Bok Center supports them in all of that.”“We are at a turning point in how we think about teaching and learning,” said Terry Aladjem, executive director of the center and a lecturer on social studies. “We have wonderful scholars at Harvard who are the leaders in their fields, but as a University we haven’t yet engaged as fully as we might in a common discussion about teaching. I believe faculty members are eager to have that conversation, and our role is to become a place where that conversation can happen.”last_img read more

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Darren Criss, Aaron Tveit, Lea Salonga, Laura Osnes & More to Headline Elsie Fest

first_imgGreat White Way favorite Darren Criss, who recently finished his Broadway.com Audience Choice Award-winning run as the star of Hedwig and the Angry Inch, is launching an outdoor music festival for fans of Broadway. The first-ever Elsie Fest, named after Sally Bowles’ roomie, will take place on September 27 at 2PM in New York City.“I was at Coachella and thought ‘let’s do this for show tunes,’” said Criss in a statement. Broadway producer and Jujamcyn Theaters President Jordan Roth, who is also behind the event, added: “Elsie Fest will give us all a totally unique experience to come together to celebrate the music we love, the performers we love, and the community we love.”Criss will headline the concert alongside Aaron Tveit, Lea Salonga and Laura Osnes. Also appearing are Hamilton star Leslie Odom Jr., StarKid, Seth Rudetsky and many more special guests.Promising tunes from the stage and screen, Elsie Fest will take place on Pier 97 on the West Side Highway at 57th Street. The legendary Greenwich Village piano bar Marie’s Crisis, which Criss is known to frequent (sometimes with Salonga), will host a beer garden and food trucks will also be on hand.Tickets, which range from $50 to $250, are available at ElsieFest.com. Laura Osnes Star Files View Comments Darren Crisslast_img read more

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2020’s top cyber threats in banking

first_imgCSI recently polled banking executives from around the country, representing 227 financial institutions from across the asset-size spectrum to uncover their top strategies for the coming year. The data from this survey was then collected and used to create an executive report to help bankers get a pulse on the industry’s hot topics and strategies.According to the survey, bankers seem ready for cyber threats, rating themselves 3.7/5 in cybersecurity readiness.While it’s encouraging that institutions feel so confident about their cybersecurity readiness, at the same time, it’s concerning. Experts warn that, as fast as institutions get a grip on the latest hacking techniques and install preventative measures, cyber criminals adjust and adapt.Assessing 2020’s Top Cybersecurity ThreatsThe 2020 Banking Priorities Survey delved deep into cybersecurity threats to gauge bankers’ understanding of this continuously evolving risk and asked what is the greatest cybersecurity threat to your bank in 2020? continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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