Category: wegrulzp

Watch Elton John And Lady Gaga Perform ‘Don’t Let The Sun Go Down On Me’

first_imgLady Gaga has been on something of a streak lately. From singing the Star Spangled Banner at the Super Bowl, performing a David Bowie tribute at the Grammys and a scheduled performance at tonight’s Oscars, there’s just no telling what she’ll do next. Already in Los Angeles, she made her way over to an Elton John concert on the rooftop of the old Tower Records building in West Hollywood.When John was performing his big hit “Don’t Let The Sun Go Down On Me,” Gaga appeared mid-song and accompanied throughout. Watch the footage below:last_img

read more

A transformative TV role

first_img“There’s a lot to Laverne Cox,” said the actress Monday afternoon when asked to describe her upbringing.In an interview with Brianna Suslovic ’16 and Maddie Studt ’16, Cox, one of the breakout stars of the acclaimed Netflix series “Orange Is the New Black,” spoke about everything from her Southern roots to her activism and rise to fame as a transgender African-American actress.“Growing up in Alabama, I didn’t have the language, but I knew I was feminine,” she said. “I was bullied as a kid from preschool on, chased home from school everyday.”Being transgender and black has made her work harder to be taken seriously in her craft, Cox said.“I’ve sometimes overcompensated out of insecurity, or fear that I’ve not been good enough, or people are going to make these assumptions about me anyway,” she said. “Now I’m learning that I am enough as I am. When we hustle for worthiness, we don’t believe inherently that we deserve that worthiness. I’m trying to be authentically myself, while remaining teachable in the process.”On “Orange Is the New Black,” Cox portrays Sophia Burset, an imprisoned transgender woman. The show has been lauded for showcasing marginalized voices and bringing transgender issues to the forefront of popular culture.“Our characters are written with such depth and humanity and such multidimensionality,” said Cox.Before joining the show, Cox produced and starred in VH1’s “TRANSForm Me” and was a contestant on VH1’s “I Wanna Work for Diddy.” But with the popularity of “Orange Is the New Black,” said Cox, “everything has changed.”“I can’t walk through the airport now,” she said. “And I love all of you, but if you see me in the airport, I am not ready to talk!”The biggest life change, she divulged, is having a broader platform to be an activist for transgender people. “I’ve been talking about this for years, and now people are listening,” she said. Cox has been an outspoken supporter of CeCe McDonald, an African-American transgender woman who was jailed in 2012 for stabbing and killing an attacker, and regularly speaks about violence against transgender people of color.Delving into life on the set of “Orange Is the New Black,” Cox said that while filming season two, the cast bonded more than during season one. “We sing a lot on set,” she said. “Mostly Beyoncé!” The new season premieres on Netflix on June 6.As far as plot spoilers go, Cox was mum, allowing only that Lorraine Toussaint comes onboard to play a character named Vee, and that viewers are in for a shakeup. “It’s major,” she promised.When asked whether she believed Hollywood would ever cast transgender actors in nontrans roles, Cox was positive. “I do believe that,” she said.In her own career, Cox said she wants to keep acting, work with great directors on great projects, and “continue to be challenged.” In discussing the “sensationalized, trivialized” ways that transgender stories are presented in the media, Cox said, “There’s a focus on transition and surgery, and I believe that objectifies trans folks, and that becomes the only takeaway.”Discussing how to combat ignorance about transgender people, Cox said, “It’s up to each and every one of us to have those conversations and spark those conversations. You can even use ‘Orange Is the New Black’ as a jump-off. I believe if we approach people with love and empathy, I think that can be the beginning of a wonderful revolution.”At the end of the conversation — which was sponsored by the Harvard Foundation, Office for the Arts at Harvard, Harvard College Women’s Center, Harvard Gay and Lesbian Caucus, Queer Students and Allies, and Office of BGLTQ Student Life — Cox was overwhelmed by an impromptu Harvard Veritones performance of the show’s theme song, “You’ve Got Time” by Regina Spektor.“I want a copy of that for the cast!” she said. “They’d love that!”last_img read more

read more

A cornerstone of Allston innovation

first_imgWestern Avenue in Allston has been a hub of development in recent years. In addition to new facilities at Harvard Business School and innovation labs dotting the corridor, the progress being made on Harvard’s Science and Engineering Complex is a clear reminder of big things still to come.This flagship of the University’s expanded campus across the Charles River will not only serve as an academic home to more than 1,800 students, researchers, and faculty — the majority of whom account for roughly two-thirds of the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) — but will also provide the latest node in a network of Harvard spaces dedicated to testing ideas and incubating enterprises.The Maker Space, a 5,000-square-foot street-level workshop, will offer high-end manufacturing and assembly workstations outfitted with state-of-the-art equipment, available to Harvard creators of all skill levels. The space will include several facilities clustered together to encourage interaction among its users and accommodate diverse demands for equipment. Once the facility is completed in 2020, it will be open to the entire Harvard community.“Allston has become a hub for innovators and entrepreneurs from across the University, and the new Maker Space will provide yet another outlet for the skill and imagination of the Harvard community,” said Harvard President Drew Faust. “We look forward to seeing the ideas of engineers, designers, artists, and so many other creators realized in the heart of our expanding campus.”The facility will also offer an active-learning classroom with spaces for students to work on and store long-term projects, and will complement the entrepreneurial efforts under way in Allston at the Business School, three labs (Innovation Lab, Launch Lab, Life Lab), and the developing enterprise research campus.A view from Western Avenue of the proposed Science and Engineering Complex in Allston.Frank Doyle, the John A. Paulson Dean of SEAS, said: “With the Science and Engineering Complex, Harvard’s fastest growing School will have a home in Allston that better connects our students and faculty, our University, and the community. From the day those doors open, the Maker Space facilities will be a catalyst for discoveries and inventions we cannot even imagine today.”Support for the space has been provided by the Cihang Foundation, a philanthropic organization founded by HNA Group in 2010 to broaden the company’s commitment to society and social responsibility. Since its founding in 1993, HNA Group has evolved from a regional airline based on Hainan Island in southern China into a global Fortune 500 company focused on tourism, logistics, and financial services. The Cihang Foundation has supported a number of educational efforts, including the UNESCO Global Partnership for Girls’ and Women’s Education. Adam Tan, CEO of HNA Group, sees the space as a catalyst for creativity.During a recent visit to Allston, Tan and other HNA representatives met with Faust, Doyle, and HBS Dean Nitin Nohria.“Incubation space plays a vital role in bringing enterprises to market,” Tan said. “Harvard is already a global leader in research and discovery, and the Maker Space will empower their talented community of students, faculty, and researchers to propel inventions and innovations for the benefit of all. With its gift to the Maker Space, the Cihang Foundation furthers its mission to give back and echoes HNA Group’s core values of innovation, integrity, and excellence in performance.”last_img read more

read more

Asian shares down on caution after modest US gains

first_imgTOKYO (AP) — Asian shares are mostly lower as caution sets in over company earnings reports, recent choppy trading in technology stocks and prospects for more economic stimulus for a world battling a pandemic. Japan’s Nikkei 225, South Korea’s Kospi and other regional benchmarks all fell in Thursday morning trading. Also on market players’ minds is the vaccine rollout, which is becoming more organized in the U.S., but yet to play out in much of Asia, except for China. Stocks closed modestly higher on Wall Street, where investors are worried about the timing and scope of another round of stimulus spending.last_img

read more

SUB movie committee brings award-winning films to campus

first_imgThough many students associate room 101 in DeBartolo Hall with large classes such as chemistry or biology, the lecture hall becomes a movie theater on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights with the help of the Student Union Board’s (SUB) movie committee members.Junior Daniel Riley heads the committee, which is comprised of dorm representatives and student SUB members. In total, the ten committee members work with graphic designers and a publicity team to bring 10 movies to campus each semester.The committee members work on the movie lineups for half a semester at a time, ensuring they will have access to the movies, since release dates often change. To pick the movies, Riley said the committee members first peruse the list of available films from two third-party sites that deal directly with movie production companies for the rights to a film, which organizations can then rent. Then the committee members who have seen the films give input about the movies on the list.“We find out which ones are the popular ones that we think the majority of the student body would like, as well as maybe some of the hidden gems that we think are worth showing that maybe there’s not a huge following for,” Riley said.The committee members also look for movies from a variety of genres, Riley said.“We do search for a little bit of diversity,” he said. “We try to get one family movie in [during a half semester period] … We don’t want it to be all comedy or all drama.”Once the committee members have made their selections, Riley emails his contacts at the sites. The committee gets the movies either through a pre-released DVD or downloading and streaming from a router box, and must return the movies when they are finished with them.“Because we are a college campus, we do get a bit of an advanced screening on it,” he said. “For example, ‘La La Land’ — my guess is it won’t be out on DVD for another month or so, at the earliest. … You actually get to see them before you would have the access on pay-per-view, Netflix, DVD, things like that.”While attendance varies with different movies, Riley said a weekend’s showings will typically average between 100 and 300 people, although “Moana” attracted over 600 people. Riley said most people attend the 8 p.m. showings on Fridays or Saturdays.Because bringing the movies to campus is not free, the committee uses its budget and revenue from people who attend the movie to fund the movie nights. While the committee can cover all costs with some movies, Riley said, it takes a loss on others.One such film, “Hunt for the Wilderpeople,” is Riley’s favorite film of the ones he has brought to campus. Riley called the film a “special gem,” and said while the attendance for the film was small, the people who saw it enjoyed it.“We don’t make all our money back from the cost of renting a movie like that, but it does make me very happy [to see] how the student body gets excited for it as well,” he said.The rest of this semester’s SUB movie lineup features Academy Award-nominated films “Hidden Figures,” “Moonlight” and “Fences,” as well as “The Lego Batman Movie.” The committee will also be showing “The Breakfast Club” for AnTostal week.Students who are interested in following the movies on campus for a given week can email Riley at [email protected] to be added to the movie email list. Riley said the email list has over 150 members, and members receive information about the schedule and special movie promotions.Tags: movie nights, Student Union Board, SUB movieslast_img read more

read more

Josh Groban & Kelly Clarkson Are Angels of Music in New Track from Stages

first_img View Comments Josh Groban It’s not always about being Miss (or Mister) Independent. Josh Groban’s previously announced theater-centric album Stages drops on April 28. Joining the crooner for The Phantom of the Opera’s “All I Ask of You” is three-time Grammy winner Kelly Clarkson. Take a listen to the track below; it may not be the Phantom you know and love, but something tells us these two would absolutely kill it on the Great White Way (and they’ve both let it be known)! The album will also include tunes from Chess, Sunday in the Park with George and Les Miserables, as well as a special Carousel duet with Audra McDonald.center_img Star Fileslast_img

read more

Onion Crop

first_imgGeorgia’s Vidalia onion crop is planted and looks “promising,” according to Chris Tyson, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s area onion agent, but he cautions producers to be proactive in managing onion diseases.Increased moisture, especially from the excessive rainfall Georgia experienced in November and December, can raise the potential risk for diseases like Botrytis leaf blight, purple blotch and Stemphylium leaf blight. These diseases can be extremely problematic early in the growing season.“These diseases primarily infect onion leaves, which can reduce bulb yield and size,” said Tyson, who is based at the UGA Vidalia Onion and Vegetable Research Center in Toombs County, Georgia. “At this point, we would like our growers to be on a spray program where they are applying fungicides every seven to 14 days.”Botrytis leaf blight infects onion foliage. Initial symptoms include white, necrotic spots surrounded by pale halos. Leaves with severe symptoms may lead to reduced bulb size.Purple blotch is one of the more common onion diseases. The fungus overwinters as mycelium in onion leaf debris from the previous growing season. Once conditions for sporulation become favorable, the inoculum becomes windborne and spreads to new foliage. Symptoms are small, tan lesions that often turn purplish-brown. Lesions usually girdle leaves, causing them to fall over.Stemphylium leaf blight has been a problematic disease for Georgia Vidalia growers over the last few years. The disease’s symptoms are similar to purple blotch; however, the lesions appear darker and olive brown to black. The lesions are often more numerous on the sides of onion leaves facing the prevailing wind. The lesions grow quickly and cause severe leaf blighting during periods of prolonged wetness.There are other onion diseases Georgia producers need to be wary of later in the growing season, most notably downy mildew and center rot.Downy mildew moves into onion fields through wind currents from warmer areas. It can rapidly damage onion leaves and tissue, leading to serious losses in yield and bulb quality. Temperatures between 50 and 55 degrees Fahrenheit, long periods of leaf wetness and high relative humidity are optimal conditions for the spread of downy mildew infections.Center rot is a bacterial disease that becomes a concern when temperatures start to warm up. Infected leaves on the center of the plant will bleach and usually collapse and droop beside the onion neck.“We are stressing to our growers that it is important to be proactive with your spray program in order to help prevent disease inoculum from building up into the crop,” Tyson said.Tyson is optimistic despite the fact that many growers had to delay planting their crop this year due to added moisture in the fields. According to weather.uga.edu, 15 inches of rain fell in Vidalia, Georgia, from Nov. 1 through Jan. 10 — peak planting time for onions.“Some had to push back planting as much as four weeks because of fields that had too much moisture,” he said. “Luckily, we do have a broad planting window for planting onions. At this point, most growers have finished planting. I think overall we are in good standing with this year’s crop.”The Vidalia Onion and Vegetable Research Center, located between Reidsville and Lyons in Toombs County, is home to specialized onion research conducted by researchers in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.For more information about onions, see vegetables.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

read more

What does your credit box look like?

first_imgCredit is a subject that credit unions find incredibly familiar. It is the driver of everything we do, from our profit to our promotions to our processes. We understand what type of credit risk we want to take in our loan portfolio, we think about how we want to attract those borrowers that fit our preferred profile, and we chase credit recovery through collections efforts when our borrowers fail to repay. We know exactly what the extension of credit means for our institution. In a financial institution, a credit score is simply more numbers that are part of a larger calculation. However, I wonder how often we think about what credit means for the average, every day people we serve. Most of our members are not as familiar with credit scoring models as we are, and many do not watch their credit closely as a measure of their financial health. Credit may be the component of the 5 ‘C’s’ of credit that we may potentially take too seriously. We need to be willing to have a fuller understanding of what makes up an individual applicant’s credit score, and not just because we want higher loan yield or need to grow our portfolio.  It is often easy to make a moral judgment about an individual based on their credit score. Credit scores tell stories. Good credit scores are stories of responsibility, of opportunity, and in some cases, of privilege. Some members are fortunate to have good credit because they have strong social ties willing to lend a hand in time of need, allowing them to keep their credit score pristine in times of challenge. Other credit scores tell stories of divorce, of disappointment, and of heartache. These stories are stories of an abrupt layoff, of an unexpected cancer diagnosis or car accident, or other unanticipated tragedy. Still others tell stories of lack of access – of neighborhoods populated with subprime lenders at ‘buy-here-pay-here’ car lots, check cashers and payday lenders. These credit scores may tell stories with deep histories. The numbers on paper cannot reflect the distrust in financial institutions behind the scores. An absent credit score may not fully tell the story of the member whose parent was redlined by a local bank, or how a family lost everything as a neighborhood declined around their property.  The number on paper doesn’t reflect the challenges to access faced by that family, leading them to be un-banked or underbanked a generation or two later. A lack of credit score can reflect a history in a country with an unstable financial system. A lack of credit score can reflect a language barrier or unfamiliarity with the United States financial system. This lack of score can lead to lost housing opportunity, further perpetuating the cycle of spotty borrowing.  Character is important. As a safe and sound institution, we want borrowers who will repay.  This is not an article about lending to underserved communities, risk management or credit policies. Your own balance sheet and strategic plan will determine what that means for your institution. Still, credit has implications and has a legacy. In the United States, it has been used to create opportunity for some and has been a barrier to access for others. My institution, North Side Community Federal Credit Union, is one of a very small handful of credit unions in the country that operates a housing counseling agency. As part of our services, some of our staff meets with individuals for a lengthy two-hour credit counseling session. We see a wide range of stories. Yes, some have destroyed their credit with irresponsible financial management. Those stories come from all walks of life. Many more have never learned about credit or had an event beyond their control that rendered them unable to responsibly repay their debt. The one thing they all have in common is a desire to improve their credit, understanding it will improve their financial situation. As cooperatives, we have a unique opportunity to look beyond just the scores we see on paper. We have an opportunity to use credit to help people improve their lives and provide access to greater opportunity. This will look different based on each individual field of membership, but the balance sheets are not our primary mission. The balance sheet is simply the method by which we accomplish our mission.  Recently, the CEO of a CDFI credit union shared how excited she was to offer an ITIN product. An outside observer commented to her that what her credit union was truly doing was offering hope to people. Hope is a rare commodity.  If credit unions can offer that to people through the way we transact we can offer a unique value proposition that will be difficult for any other financial services provider to compete on. 49SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Sarah Marshall Sarah Marshall is a consultant in the credit union industry, and can be reached for partnership and speaking opportunities through Your Credit Union Partner. Her background in community development includes … Web: https://yourcupartner.org Detailslast_img read more

read more

NAFCU active this week as NCUA Board meets, House committee talks tax reform

first_img continue reading » 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr NAFCU is heavily engaged with regulators and lawmakers this week as the NCUA Board prepares for discussion of the proposed closure of the Temporary Corporate Credit Union Stabilization Fund (TCCUSF) and the House Small Business Committee gets ready for a hearing on small business tax reform.Also this week: The association is also offering a free webcast with information on how credit unions can recover from the Equifax data breach.The TCCUSF closure proposal is slated for discussion Thursday during the NCUA Board’s open meeting. While NAFCU respects the work the NCUA has done on its proposal to close the TCCUSF, NAFCU members are opposed to it because they want a full refund – instead of the much smaller portion that is being proposed.The NCUA’s proposal would close the TCCUSF, merge the fund’s assets and liabilities into the National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund (NCUSIF) and increase the NCUSIF’s normal operating level from 1.3 percent to 1.39 percent – the highest level in the fund’s history. NAFCU is heeding its members’ concerns, and it will continue to advocate for a full TCCUSF refund on behalf of all credit unions.last_img read more

read more

5 CECL panel discussion takeaways from 2019 Annual Conference

first_imgAt this year’s Annual Conference, I connected with industry executives for a panel discussion on CECL issues that should be addressed throughout the implementation process. I was joined by Kim Alexander of Blue FCU, Renee Nelson of First Community CU, John Sjaastad of SAS Institute, and panel moderator Eric Mangham of Arkansas FCU. Here are the key issues we discussed.1. Data There is a need for historical data, which encompasses the contractual term of a pool or at least one economic cycle. There’s also a need for data integrity, validation, and reconciliation of all data sets to historical and current loan balances.2. Integration The CECL committee must communicate with other committees such as ALM. Forecasting factors and results from the CECL model will need to be applied to other models, and results will also need to be integrated into the overall analysis and budgeting. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

read more