Category: zzqmgvgp

Taking to the woods

first_imgFor a handful of Harvard undergraduate and graduate students, the January semester break included a rare treat — a hands-on, up-close-and-personal visit to the Harvard Forest in Petersham, Mass.The multi-day program, which included both time spent in the classroom and time spent outdoors in the forest, covered a wide range of topics, from science to art to rural planning, and how each could be related to the forest itself.In addition to learning about the forest, students also got a close-up look at several of the ongoing research projects taking place there.“I read the biographies of the students that came this year, and it was interesting how many of them had not spent much time outdoors,” said Emery Boose, senior investigator at the forest. “One of the things we always hope for with all our programs is, even in the short time that they’re here, to generate some love and interest in the outdoors, and in protecting the outdoors.”last_img read more

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EU gives Poland a month to respond to justice system fears

first_imgBRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union’s executive body is warning Poland that it has a month to address long-standing concerns about laws that Brussels fears undermines the independence of Supreme Court judges or face possible legal action. The European Commission says Poland is violating EU law by allowing the country’s Disciplinary Chamber of the Supreme Court to make decisions which have a direct impact on judges and the way they do their jobs. The commission says the independence and impartiality of the chamber are not guaranteed, and that this can have a “chilling effect” on judges. Brussels is threatening to take the case to Europe’s top court unless Poland fixes the problem in time.last_img

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Physicists study Higgs boson

first_imgResearchers from a global collaboration, including Notre Dame faculty and students, presented findings further characterizing the recently-documented Higgs boson on Thursday in La Thuile, Italy. Physics professor Colin Jessop, one of the researchers, called the findings “the biggest discovery of particle physics for the past 50 years.” “We can say with some surety now that the particle that we observed is the Higgs boson, or what some people call the ‘God particle,’” Jessop said. The Higgs boson is a particle created in the high-impact, high-energy collision of protons at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland. CERN is the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Jessop said all objects gain their property of mass through interaction with the Higgs field. “If you create enough energy to interact with this field, you’ll make what’s called a Higgs boson, a particle that is kind of the smoking gun that there’s a Higgs field there,” Jessop said. Jessop said researchers now can confirm that the experimental particle’s basic characteristics, including spin and parity, match those of the theoretical Higgs boson. “In the last six months, we’ve been taking two-and-a-half times more data since July,” he said. ” and the results that we presented [in Italy] were evidence that the particle we discovered behaves exactly as we thought it was going to.” Jessop said the team confirmed the experimental Higgs boson interacts with fermions, the essential components of matter, the way it theoretically should. Until now, Jessop said researchers had not observed interactions between the Higgs boson and fermions. “It’s supposed to interact with everything – that’s how it gives mass,” he said. “So, if there were a set of particles it didn’t interact with, then it wouldn’t have been the Higgs boson we thought it was. … We showed that the Higgs boson interacts with all the particles we thought it should.” Jessop said the findings support evidence scientists in the(Compact Muon Solenoi) Collaboration,nwhich includeg the Notre Dame team, gathered last year that suggesg the existence of the Higgs boson “We started seeing the hints of this about a year ago at this time,” Jessop said. “we started to see some evidence, but not conclusive.”Then the signals got stronger and stronger, and in July we had a big announcement that we had observed something that looked like a Higgs boson, but we weren’t absolutely sure.” Jessop said building accelerators able to supplh enough energy for the proton collision has been the keynobstacle to finding the Higgs boson. “We’ve been looking to try to make one of these Higgs bosons by putting more and more energy into it … but we haven’t been able, as it turns out, to get to sufficient energy until just recently.” Jessop said.  Notre Dame sends postdoctoral researchers and graduate students to the LHC for a hands-on experience, Jessop said. “All the people who do the hard work really are the young people, the graduate students and the [post-doctorate studentss,” he said. Postdoctoral research associatr Jeff Kolb said he and graduate students Nil Valls and Doug Berry spent time living in Europe, not just writing computer codes to analyze data, but alsokworking on the experiment’s equipment. In order to be listed as an author, Kolb said students must word for a year on something other than data analysis, among other requirements. Valls said looking for evidence of the Higgs boson was the chief difficulty in analyzing the 20 petabytes (the equivalent of 20 million gigabytes) of data per year.scientists produce at the LHC. “It’s like looking for a needle in a haystack,” Valls said. “Writing code is inevitable, for grad students at least, because that is the best way to sort of look for those needles.” Jessop said Higgs research continues despite the temporary halt of collisions at the LHC to allow upgrades meant to double the energy of the accelerator. Data collections will resume in 2016 and continue througo 2020, he said. the Notre Dame team will continue working to improve the Higgs detector for the program’s second phase from 2023 to 2035. “At the new energy there is a good possibility of further new discoveries in addition to continuing to study the Higgs in detail,” Jessop said. …We’ve had a giant success, but for us it’s kind of a beginning.”last_img read more

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Top 40: Snowsports

first_img1. Head AdaptEdge BootCustom fit. That’s the story with the Head’s Adaptive Fit technology, which allows the skier to adjust the width of the AdaptEdge Boot with the turn of an allen wrench. It’s a small adjustment (2mm) but skiers know that small adjustments in their boot can make a big difference in the amount of control they have on the slopes.$549; head.com35. K2 Rival BC HelmetThis lid is built for the backcountry with an innovative beanie liner and a removable shell. What’s the advantage? Ditch the shell when you’re trekking up the slope to keep yourself cool. Re-attach it before you start shredding downhill.$119.95; k2skis.com37. MFD Alltime SystemWant to hit the backcountry stash without investing in a whole new set of skis? The MFD Alltime might be the answer. This is a plate you attach to your downhill skis that allows you to use your downhill bindings as AT bindings, so you can tour the backcountry with your regular skis. The plate has an integrated free-pivot walk mode and climber bar you can engage with your pole. You’ll still need skins for traction, but this add-on could open up a whole new world of terrain.$300; runmfd.com36. K2 LockJaw CarbonThese carbon on carbon backcountry poles adjust from 42 to 58 inches on the fly (extend them for the climb, shorten for the descent). The poles also come with K2’s newest bag of backcountry ski tricks: a bubble inclinometer so you can see how steep the slope is that you’re eyeballing. Point the tip of the pole up the fall line and read the slope angle in the bubble. The Lockjaw also includes a built-in snow depth meter.$109.95; k2skis.com32. Black Diamond Compactor PoleBlack Diamond revolutionized the trekking pole world with their folding Z-Pole, and the company hopes to do it to the snowsports world with the Compactor, an aluminum four-season pole that folds into three sections for easy storage, and has an extended height adjustment of 20cm. This is your one pole for backcountry snow.$119.95; blackdiamondequipment.com30. Zeal Optics ReconRidiculous GPS enabled goggles, you can watch your speed, video, connect to your phone, all through your goggles.$500; zealoptics.com33. Outdoor Research Ambit GloveIn the immortal words of Wooderson in Dazed and Confused, “Hey man, watch the leather.” The leather on the fingers of this glove is TouchTec, which allows you to operate the touchscreen of your smart phone without peeling off your gloves. It’s handy on a cold lift when you want to change your playlist without losing a digit. And as for the actual gloves, they’re built for biting conditions with a fully waterproof insert and toasty insulation.$99; outdoorresearch.com34. Salomon BBR SkiMost ski companies have put their innovation into fatter skis that perform better in powder. Awesome if you live in Utah. But what about us East Coast ski bums? Enter the BBR, a front-country ski that tears up the groomed runs thanks to the narrow waist and skinny tail, but floats in powder as well because of the surfboard-shaped tip with rocker. Even better, it’s considerably lighter than most powder skis on the market.$875; salomon.comlast_img read more

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Ruben’s Revenge! Mets Chase Utley, Dodgers in 13-Run Rout to Keep Despair at Bay

first_imgView image | gettyimages.com I think it’s safe to say we can now stop worrying about whether the Mets would win Game 3 of their National League Division Series against the Dodgers, or more specifically, against Chase Utley. He was enough of a thorn in the Mets’ side when he played second base for the Phillies before his sinister slide took out our spirited shortstop Ruben Tejada Saturday night in LA.At first glimpse, it looked to me like Tejada had kneed Utley in the head since his helmet flew off as they collided, and I assumed he’d be on the receiving end of a concussion. But the damage was much worse for our side. Tejada had broken his right leg, the out at second was overruled, the run counted, and the Dodgers were suddenly on the rebound as our player was carted off the field and headed for the DL.Now in the twilight of his career, the 36-year-old Utley has always played the game hard. As a second baseman he’s been on the receiving end of more than a few take-out slides himself. When he’s been in the batter’s box, he’s been plunked so many times he’s earned a hit-by-pitch ranking in the record books—right up there with Alex Rodriguez, who’s also “taken one for the team” many times in his Yankee Pinstripes.Like our version of the Roman Games, Mets fans wanted blood. Had I been at Citi Field Monday night, I’m sure I would have loudly joined in the Greek chorus chanting “We Want Utley!” until my throat hurt. I’m glad Joe Torre, acting as the Majors’ chief baseball officer, suspended him for two games because he went into the slide rather late.Through the players union, he’s appealing his suspension, and the process could drag on for a while. So be it. Just having Utley around was enough to motivate the hometown crowd. But would it be enough to focus the Mets? By the second inning, doubts were on the upswing in New York as Los Angeles had a 3-0 lead.Before the game, the Mets manager Terry Collins, an infuriating master of understatement to those passionate fans who liken him to “an empty bag of balls” or “a hood ornament,” had assessed the situation this way: “Broke my shortstop’s leg. That’s all I know.”The Mets players were seething, hungering for revenge—as were legions of fans. Collins reportedly discouraged our Game 3 starter, the Dark Knight himself, Matt Harvey, from seeking retaliation because Collins knew that Harvey would have been ejected immediately—and our bullpen is shaky enough in long relief—except for that amazing 42-year-old Bartolo Colon, who can shake it and not break it—and he has a whole lot to shake when he mounts that mound.What was the matter with the Dark Knight? We wanted revenge! Harvey gave up four consecutive singles. Had Collins been a downer?Not to worry! Of course, being a true Mets fan means never not worrying. The team did roar back, thanks to Dodgers starter Brett Anderson, one of the weak links in their strong rotation. In the bottom of the second inning, our hyper right-fielder, Curtis Granderson blasted a three-run double that just missed being a home run. Before we could exhale, our team had not only tied the game, they’d taken the lead. What hit was sweeter in Game 3? Some may claim that Yoenis Cespedes’s three-run homer to the upper deck—431 feet from home plate—took the cake. I loved that, too, but I think Travis d’Arnoud’s two-run shot was the icing. Until then, he’d been in a bad playoff slump, 0-for-7. We need his bat to come alive and it finally did. Somebody always seems to step up on this 2015 team—when they’re hot, that is. One day it’s David Wright—and to me, his two-run single, which turned out to be the game winner, in Game 1 was just such a tribute to his inspiring work ethic, his constant pain, and his valor. Another time up comes Daniel Murphy or Lucas Duda to make a difference. You never know.The Mets scored 13 runs in all—a franchise playoff record. But no lead is ever enough for the Mets, as far as I’m concerned.After Harvey put the Mets in a three-run hole, he told Collins it’d go no deeper. He had a tough game but he proved his worth. Harvey had thrown 97 pitches through five innings, nearing his do-no-harm limit. With typical flourish, Colon came in and struck out the side. The next inning Colon gave up a run, so Collins had our great rookie phenom Michael Conforto pinch-hit for him, and he came through with a deep sacrifice fly.Could we begin to relax? Are you kidding me? We’re coasting into the ninth inning, 13-to-4, and the next thing we knew a forgettable pitcher named Erik Goeddel—and the sooner the Mets forget him the better—had given up a three-run homer and a single. That comfy cushion the Mets had built up didn’t feel so comfortable.Certainly some fans had departed the stands or switched off the game because they actually had to show up for work Tuesday morning, and they are blameless, but those who could afford to stick it out knew the truth: It ain’t over til it’s over, as the great philosopher of baseball, Yogi Berra, used to say. Just beyond the base paths lies the abyss.Here we were, Game 3, a must-win for the Mets given all that had transpired in Game 2. There were no outs. The Dodgers were threatening. The skies were darkening. So when Collins motioned to the bullpen and brought out our closer, Jeurys Familia, to finish what Harvey had started, it all made perfect sense. Of course, it wasn’t a save situation—the Mets had a six-run lead. But give Collins credit. He has embraced the Mets’ existential condition. Watching the lead shrink by another run or two (or three, god help us!) would have let all the good feeling of revenge and triumph slip away. Who let the dogs out? Defeat, which had seemed so improbable, suddenly seemed plausible. Just like that, it began to feel like the worst day in July when the Mets couldn’t do anything right—and our captain, David Wright, was nowhere in sight. Oh, let us rejoice that the mighty Familia was on our mound Monday night. With his command, the inning was soon mercifully behind us and victory was ours.So now we can start worrying about Game 4. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York View image | gettyimages.comlast_img read more

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UK roundup: Staff changes at LGPS Central, USS, Railpen

first_imgThe UK’s biggest pension pension scheme has appointed Dominic Gibb as its new chief financial officer.Gibb joins the Universities Superannuation Scheme (USS) from Lehman Brothers, where he had worked with PricewaterhouseCoopers on the winding up of the UK operations of the failed US investment bank. He was financial controller for Europe, the Middle East and Africa for the bank before its collapse in 2008.Gibb replaces Jennifer Halliday, who resigned from USS on 31 March 2017.His appointment was announced as the £60bn (€68.4bn) scheme faces an uncertain future. The Universities and Colleges Union (UCU) today said its members had voted in favour of strike action in a dispute over changes to USS’ benefit payments. Universities UK (UUK), the representative organisation for higher education employers, wants to switch the scheme from defined benefit to defined contribution in an effort to control rising contribution costs.University staff vote for strike actionNearly all of the UK’s universities face disruption next month after staff voted for strike action. On a turnout of 58% of its members, the UCU said 88% had backed a walkout, which would affect 61 of the country’s 68 higher education institutions.UCU general secretary Sally Hunt said: “Universities will be hit with levels of strike action not seen before on UK campuses if a deal cannot be done over the future of USS pensions. Members have made it quite clear they are prepared to take action to defend their pensions and the universities need to work with us to avoid widespread disruption.“Even at this late stage we urge universities to work with us to reach an agreement that protects the defined benefit element of USS pensions.”In response, a UUK spokesperson described the ballot result as “disappointing”, and said that not reforming the scheme would be ”a dangerous gamble”. The spokesperson added: “A solution to the significant funding challenges facing USS needs to be found. UUK’s priority is to put USS on a secure and sustainable footing while offering attractive, market-leading pensions – the very best that can be afforded by both employers and employees.” USS reported an official deficit of around £5bn following its 2017 actuarial valuation, but other valuations have put the shortfall as high as £12bn-£17bn. It said the cost of funding future pension benefits had increased by 35% and that contribution increases of six to seven percentage points could be required.Public pension pool hires ex-Nestle investment chiefLGPS Central, the asset manager set up to run £42bn of assets for nine local government pension schemes (LGPS), has named Duncan Sanford as interim deputy CIO.Sanford left Nestlé Capital Management last year after a restructuring led to the international food and drink company shutting down much of its internal investment operations.LGPS Central has also hired two staff from the West Midlands Pension Fund (WMPF), one of the founder members of the asset pool. Mike Hardwick has joined as investment director for infrastructure and property, having most recently run alternatives at WMPF, while Michael Marshall is set to join as director for responsible investment and engagement. He is currently the responsible investment officer at WMPF.Finally, Omar Ghafur has joined as investment director for private equity. He was previously in charge of private investments for a charitable foundation, according to a press release from LGPS Central.Jason Fletcher, CIO, said the appointments were “critical to our delivery of the risk-adjusted return after costs that our partner funds require to meet their future commitments”.LGPS Central announced on Friday that it planned to roll out 10 investment vehicles for its pension fund clients.Investment director exits RailpenCiarán Barr, investment director at RPMI Railpen, is to leave the multi-employer scheme for the railways industry later this year.RPMI Railpen announced on Friday that Barr would step down from the investment team during the first half of 2018, having worked at the group for nearly nine years.During his tenure Barr oversaw the transformation of RPMI Railpen’s investment strategy alongside fellow investment directors Paul Bishop and Richard Williams and former CEO Chris Hitchen.The departure is the latest in a series of senior staff changes at the railway industry scheme. Chris Hitchen stepped down as CEO last year and is now overseeing the creation of the Border to Coast Pension Partnership as chairman. Philip Willcock will take over as CEO next month.Paul Sturgess joined last year from Equiniti as managing director for its administration arm, while deputy CEO David Maddison became managing director for the scheme, tasked with leading support for the trustee board. Julian Cripps was appointed managing director responsible for the investment arm in 2016.John Chilman, chair of Railpen’s trustee board, said: “I, and my fellow trustee directors, would like to thank Ciarán for the contributions he has made to the success and sustainability of the Railways Pension Scheme. He has always put the interests of our members and employers first and the scheme has benefited from his thinking.”last_img read more

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Sapura Energy in New Contract Wins

first_imgSapura Energy Berhad (Sapura Energy) has secured three new contracts and two contract extensions worth approximately RM774 million.With these new wins, Sapura Energy will be executing works in Malaysia, Thailand and Brunei.Sapura Fabrication has been awarded a contract from Brunei Shell Petroleum Company (BSP) for the provision of Engineering, Procurement, Construction and Installation (EPCI) works for the Salman Project in Brunei.The project is divided into two parts consisting of the Salman greenfield scope and the Egret East greenfield scope.The Salman greenfield scope entails EPCI works and support for hook-up, pre-commissioning and commissioning of wellhead platform and substructures, pipelines and umbilical, water and chemical injection module, along with a construction yard upgrade.The Egret East greenfield scope consists of Front-End Engineering Design (FEED) services with an optional EPCI scope for wellhead platforms, substructures and pipelines.In Malaysia, Sapura Fabrication was awarded a contract from PETRONAS Carigali for the provision of Procurement, Construction, Hook-up and Commissioning (PCC), and start-up works of BNJTK BN-84 well tie-in for Bardegg-2 and the Baronia Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Development Project.For its Drilling segment, Sapura Drilling Asia has secured a contract with PTT Exploration and Production Public Company for the provision of its tender-assist drilling rig, Sapura T-17, for the Bongkot gas field in the Gulf of Thailand.Meanwhile, Sapura Drilling Asia has been awarded a contract extension by PETRONAS Carigali for the provision of its semi-submersible tender-assist drilling rig, Sapura Berani. The contract entails the drilling of five additional wells in Erb West, offshore Sabah and the Dulang facilities, offshore Peninsular Malaysia.In addition, Sapura Drilling was awarded a one-year contract extension by BSP for the provision of its semi-submersible tender-assist drilling rig, Sapura Pelaut.last_img read more

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Portsmouth man found dead in Goodwill

first_imgLocalNews Portsmouth man found dead in Goodwill by: – June 12, 2012 19 Views   2 comments Share Share A homeless man of Portsmouth who was found unconscious on the sidewalk in Goodwill on Monday evening has been identified.Police spokesman, inspector John Carbon, informed Dominica Vibes News in a report Cameus Timothy was found about 10 pm by pedestrians who contacted the police.“A homeless person who was identified to be Cameus Timothy originally from Portsmouth was found in an unconscious state at the corner of Federation Drive and Goodwill Road on the sidewalk”.According to Carbon, the man was examined and pronounced dead by a doctor who was passing in that area at that time.Timothy’s body was transported to the Princess Margaret Hospital Mortuary and a post mortem examination will be conducted to determine the cause of death. “Foul play is not suspected,” he noted.Dominica Vibes Newscenter_img Sharing is caring! Tweet Sharelast_img read more

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Barcelona are ‘a club of clowns’ with ‘no class’

first_imgFormer Barcelona forward Christophe Dugarry blasted the people in charge of the club following a turbulent week at Camp Nou. Barcelona have been branded “a club of clowns” by Christophe Dugarry after a dismal week for the club culminated in Copa del Rey elimination. Lionel Messi A 1-0 quarter-final loss to Athletic Bilbao at San Mames on Thursday was the latest blow for Barca in a turbulent period. After failing to sign an attacker before the end of the January transfer deadline, Ousmane Dembele suffered a hamstring tear that requires surgery and is expected to miss the rest of campaign. Sporting director Eric Abidal also gave an interview in which he cited a lack of effort being put in by some players as a motivating factor for the dismissal of Ernesto Valverde, which drew the ire of Lionel Messi. There have consequently been reports Messi could leave Camp Nou at the end of the season, and Dugarry – who spent six months at Barca in the 1997-98 season – was scathing in his criticism of the way the club has been run in recent years. “It’s a club of clowns. Everything is done backwards,” Dugarry said on RMC Sport. Promoted ContentThe Funniest Prankster Grandma And Her Grandson”Chronicles Of Narnia” Fans Were Bemused To See How She Looks NowNothing Compares To Stargazing Places Around The WorldWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?These TV Characters Left The Show And It Just Got BetterThe World’s 7 Most Spectacular Railway StationsPlaying Games For Hours Can Do This To Your BodyIncredible Discoveries That Puzzled The Whole WorldThe Untold Truth Of Sasha ObamaWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?Insane 3D Spraying Skills Turn In Incredible Street ArtThe 18 Most Visited Cities In The World “They buy [Philippe] Coutinho, Dembele, they buy guys and then sell them. You get the impression there is no project in this club. Loading… Read Also: Copa del Rey semi-final draw sets up possible Basque derby final “At every transfer window there is a problem. They’ve recruited very badly since the departures of Xavi and [Andres] Iniesta. They’ve spent loads. “And above all they have a very bad image. There are far too many people who do not have the elegance, the class that there should be at a club of this standing. “It’s really a club that has no class.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

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Norwood happy to be in good company

first_img “I’ve been in the same position as these boys. You have to take your chance when it comes, I’m sure that’s what Michael is telling them too,” he said. “If they get a chance in the game they’ll need to impress and I hope they do because we haven’t got the resources of other countries who can call on 30 or 40 players in a campaign – we’re looking at 22-23 realistically. “Everyone is willing the young lads to come in and impress and they’ve been welcomed with open arms.” Press Association Norwood won the battle for Cristiano Ronaldo’s shirt when Northern Ireland played Portugal in World Cup qualification and is delighted to be sharing a pitch with more big names in the coming days. “It is exciting, I’ll admit it. I’m still like a kid coming in to the squad and it’s great to play against the likes of Edinson Cavani and Diego Forlan,” he said. “They are top-class players and I want to take as much as I can from this tour and put it back into my own career. “I’ve never played a South American team and it’s an experience I want on my CV. Any time you can put yourself up against top-class opposition can only stand us in good stead for the qualifiers. “Every game in the campaign will be tough, as we found out last time. there will be no easy games and no right to win any given game. “Against the bigger nations we are known for performing a lot better so hopefully we can give another good account of ourselves against Uruguay.” There are five uncapped players in Northern Ireland’s travelling party – Trevor Carson, Luke McCullough, Liam Donnelly, Ryan McLaughlin and James Gray. None may have made the cut had O’Neill had a full panel to select from, but Norwood sees their promotion to the senior ranks as a chance to expand the player pool ahead of Euro 2016 qualification in September. Despite being just 23 the Huddersfield player is actually one of the more established figures in a depleted squad that will take on Uruguay on Friday and then Chile on June 4. He became a regular in Michael O’Neill’s first XI during the previous campaign and was eager to continue his development in South America, while the likes of Gareth McAuley, Chris Brunt, Craig Cathcart, Martin Paterson and Jamie Ward opted against making the trip. Northern Ireland midfielder Oliver Norwood admits he still feels “like a kid” when he reports for international duty.last_img read more

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