Category: iejlalyu

FCMB Group Plc (FCMB.ng) Q12013 Interim Report

first_imgFCMB Group Plc (FCMB.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Financial sector has released it’s 2013 interim results for the first quarter.For more information about FCMB Group Plc (FCMB.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the FCMB Group Plc (FCMB.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: FCMB Group Plc (FCMB.ng)  2013 interim results for the first quarter.Company ProfileFCMB Group Plc is a financial services institution offering products and services for the commercial, corporate and institutional sectors in Nigeria and Europe. The company’s core portfolio is focused on investment banking, asset management, commercial banking, corporate banking, personal banking, institutional banking and treasury and financial markets. The company also offers services for stockbroking, trusteeships, micro-lending and asset and cash management. FCMB Group Plc was founded in 1977 and its head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. FCMB Group Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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New website for Anglican Communion News Service

first_imgNew website for Anglican Communion News Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Anglican Communion Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs By ACNS staffPosted Jun 13, 2013 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Archbishop Welby visits AnglicanNews.org. Photo: Lambeth Palace[Anglican Communion News Service] The news service of the Anglican Communion has today launched its first ever purpose-built news website AnglicanNews.org.The site comes almost 20 years after the electronic news service was first launched. Since then subscribers around the world have received thousands of news articles via e-mail.“This site brings the Anglican Communion’s ability to share its stories of life and mission to a whole new level,” said Jan Butter, director for communication at the Anglican Communion Office.“Until now we’ve been restricted to sending news stories to people’s e-mail inboxes. Anglicans and Episcopalians around the world can visit the new site for, not just news, but also comment, feature stories, podcasts, videos and photos. We hope that the diverse content helps to reflect the richness and variety found across our Anglican Communion.”Butter added, “Existing subscribers will still receive email alerts, but just one a day summarizing the newest content on the site.”In a comment piece written exclusively for the new website, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby highlighted the importance of effective, grace-filled communication between Anglicans, saying it was part of the gift of the Anglican Communion.“If the Communion is a gift, then communication between us is part of that gift. This means sharing insights into what God is calling us to do, wherever we are. It means sharing our witness and our inspiration.”He added, “There have been times [members of the Anglican Communion] have used communication as a tool to hurt each another. But we must remember that above all we are called to share the love of Christ with the world. That means nothing less than communicating in a way that reflects Christ – a way that is loving and generous, patient and forgiving.”The Rev. Canon Kenneth Kearon, secretary general of the Anglican Communion, said he was excited about what this site would mean for the Churches of the Anglican Communion.“It has been suggested that the theology of Web 2.0 is Body of Christ theology,” he said. “If so, then good communications is the lifeblood that allows that body to work together to fulfill God’s mission.“I am delighted that we are able to offer this resource to the people of the Anglican Communion and I invite them to contribute content that they think will be of interest to their brothers and sisters around the world.”The site was made possible thanks to funding from The Compass Rose Society and the Church Mission Publishing Company, and to support and guidance from members of Anglican Communion worldwide. It was built by Zebedee Creations Ltd.It is part of a broader communications strategy that includes the relaunched Anglican World magazine (available at http://shop.anglicancommunion.org) and a new website for the Anglican Communion due in 2014.Visit the new website at http://www.anglicannews.orgRead Archbishop Welby’s article in the comment section. Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

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Manifesto House / James & Mau, for Infiniski

first_imgCopyHouses•Curacaví, Chile Area:  160 m² Area:  160 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project 2009 Save this picture!© Unknown photographer+ 28 Share Houses Manifesto House / James & Mau, for InfiniskiSave this projectSaveManifesto House / James & Mau, for Infiniski Manifesto House / James & Mau, for Infiniski CopyAbout this officeJames & Mau, for InfiniskiOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesCuracavíHousesSustainabilityChilePublished on November 16, 2009Cite: “Manifesto House / James & Mau, for Infiniski” 16 Nov 2009. ArchDaily. Accessed 12 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – Talis SVinyl Walls3MExterior Vinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ Solid ColorPartitionsSkyfoldRetractable Walls – Stepped & Sloped SpacesDining tablesZeitraumWood Table – TautBathroom AccessoriesBradley Corporation USARoll Towel Dispenser – Electronic TouchlessWoodLunawoodThermowood FacadesAluminium CompositesSculptformClick-on Battens in Victoria GardensMetal PanelsLongboard®Metal Ceilings – DauntlessWoodStructureCraftEngineering – Mass TimberPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesULMA Architectural SolutionsPerforated Facade PanelFiber Cements / CementsDuctal®Rainscreen Cladding Panels for Lightweight Facades in Apartment BlockBricksAcme BrickModular Size BrickMore products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?展示住宅 / James & Mau, for Infiniski是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/41001/manifesto-house-james-mau-for-infiniski Clipboard ArchDaily Year:  “COPY” Architects: James & Mau, for Infiniski Area Area of this architecture project Projects ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/41001/manifesto-house-james-mau-for-infiniski Clipboard photographs:  Unknown photographerPhotographs:  Text description provided by the architects. Infiniski designs and builds eco-friendly houses and buildings based on the use of recycled, reused and non polluting materials and the integration of alternative and renewable energy. The Infiniski projects are designed by James&Mau – Architects and designers,  Jaime Gaztelu and Mauricio Galeano, founders and partners of Infiniski. James & Mau offer Innovative and contemporary designs based on bioclimatic and modular architecture.  Infiniski is not only green, it is cheaper and faster … it tries to think the values of architecture and construction differently; a contribution to the needs of our changing environment.Project gallerySee allShow lessParsons presents “Detour”ArticlesROK Navy Museum / G.Lab*Articles Share 2009 Year:  Chile “COPY” Photographslast_img read more

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Acreage Intentions Report Coming Later This Month

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Acreage Intentions Report Coming Later This Month SHARE Acreage intentions will be revealed in USDA’s March 30 Prospective Plantings report, but much of the current discussion centers on prospects for the U.S. average corn yield. University of Illinois agricultural economist Darrel Good says the size of the 2012 crop has substantial price implications. Crop size will be determined by: the timing of planting; the magnitude and potential change in the trend yield; the expected summer weather conditions; and the location and magnitude of acreage changes.With all other things being equal, it is expected that early warmth will permit farmers to plant their corn crops early. Agronomic research in the Corn Belt reveals a slight yield penalty for extremely early planting, a wide planting window for maximum or near maximum yield potential would be early to mid-April through early May, and a yield penalty for late planting that increases with the lateness of planting. Good says – the majority of the crop is planted in the optimum window in most years.Opinions about likely summer weather in the Corn Belt center on the El Nino/La Nina Southern Oscillation. The Climate Prediction Center forecasts that the winter La Nina is transitioning to neutral conditions. According to Good, – historically, such a transition has usually been associated with corn yields near trend value, although deviations in both directions have occurred. Yet, others are suggesting a transition to an El Nino and increased chances of an above-trend yield in 2012.Source: NAFB News Service Previous articleCoalition Wants MF Global Placed Under Chapter 7Next articleE-15 One Step Closer To Being Street Legal. Andy Eubank By Andy Eubank – Mar 19, 2012 Facebook Twitter Acreage Intentions Report Coming Later This Month Facebook Twitter SHARElast_img read more

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Third level students not to sit exams in exam halls

first_imgAudioHomepage BannerNews By News Highland – April 8, 2020 Pinterest Twitter Twitter Third level students will not sit their exams in exam halls next month.The closure of universities and colleges and social distancing concerns due to Covid-19 have prompted the announcement.Government says impacted students have been notified by institutions and other means of assessment have been finalised.Dr Padraig Walsh from Quality and Qualifications Ireland says there are a number of alternatives available:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/exadfgfdgdfms7am.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Previous articleFears of possible influx of people to Donegal over holiday periodNext articleGardai get emergency powers to enforce restrictions News Highland Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Pinterest Google+center_img News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Facebook WhatsApp WhatsApp Facebook Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Google+ Third level students not to sit exams in exam halls Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

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Crowe’s owner looking to hand over restaurant

first_img Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Sponsored Content Published 8:41 pm Thursday, March 15, 2018 By The Penny Hoarder Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson “The sauce was Mr. Crowe’s own little recipe and I knew I couldn’t improve on it,” Jones said. Crowe’s opened in Troy in 1976 but the first Crowe’s was in Sylacauga, and that one has opened once again. “I started working for Mr. Crowe in 1980 and took over the lease in 1996,” Jones said. “I’ve been in the restaurant business now for 53 years, so I decided to put Crowe’s on the market and see if anybody was interested. I had planned to work until I was 70 anyway so, if it takes five years to find that somebody, I’ll be here.” Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Email the author You Might Like Officials say everyone safe after Pike Liberal Arts lockdown Pike Liberal Arts School went on lockdown Thursday afternoon “just to be safe” according to Troy Police Chief Randall Barr…. read more Robert Jones started working in the restaurant business when he was 12 years old, washing dishes by hand at Grimes Café.Grimes Café was a busy restaurant with stacks of dirty dishes that never seemed to get any smaller. Jones soon realized that he had not been called to the dishwashing business.“It was a bit much,” he said, laughing. “But Mrs. Grimes asked me if I was willing to try my hand as a waiter and I learned under Mary Bassett, Charles Stringer and William Stringer. I worked at Grimes for a long time – about 15 years.”When the Ingrams, David and Charles, bought Grimes Restaurant, Jones went to work for them for about 10 years. All the time he worked for someone else, his thoughts were of owning a restaurant. And Crowe’s has been a perfect fit.The Crowe’s location on Highway 231 has closed but Jones said his customers are finding their way to the location on North Three Notch Street.“Local people know where we are and others that have been eating with us are using their GPS to find us,” Jones said. “So, as long as people keep coming, we’ll be open and, if I ever do sell, it will be too somebody that I’m sure will keep up the standards of Crowe’s.” Hold on to your chicken cravings. Crowe’s Chicken is not going anywhere.Although Robert Jones has put out a few feelers and his iconic business is listed, there will continue to be a Crowe’s Chicken in Troy. By Jaine Treadwell Skip Book Nook to reopen Print Article Crowe’s owner looking to hand over restaurant The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… “There’s too much history with Crowe’s and the City of Troy and Troy University to let it close,” said Jones, who has owned and operated the popular chicken restaurant since 1996. “I’ll soon be 65 years old and I’ve got a little heath concern. But, if the business doesn’t sell to somebody that will keep the Crowe’s tradition going, then I’ll be here.”Like so many connoisseurs of Crowe’s fried chicken, Jones said he would miss the chicken with the special sauce that so many restaurants have tried to duplicate but just can’t quite get it.The special sauce was the creation of Sherrill Crowe, the original owner. Latest Stories Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthMost 10 Rarest Skins for FortniteTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Builders get the massage about stress

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Construction workers, who have typically relaxed with a copy ofThe Sun and a cup of tea, have been benefiting from Indian head massages,reflexology and aromatherapy to overcome stress at work. Morris & Spottiswood is providing the free holistic treatment to helpits workforces in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Newcastle and Manchester cope with thelong hours and ever-changing shift patterns the industry often demands. The firm’s HR manager Judy Stratton, said the treatments were part of itsstress management initiative. “Today’s construction industry ischaracterised by long hours and changing shift patterns. Such conditions makethe sector ripe for the manifestation of stress-related symptoms,” shesaid. “We felt across the workforce we had to act in the interests of ourworkforce and the introduction of these treatments has certainly met with anenthusiastic response.” Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Builders get the massage about stressOn 19 Nov 2002 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Case round-up

first_imgCase round-upOn 1 Jun 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Ourresident experts at Pinsents bring you a comprehensive update on all the latestdecisions that could affect your organisation, and advice on what to do aboutthem Nelson v Carillion Services, Court of Appeal, and Barton v InvestecHenderson Crosthwaite Securities Limited, EAT Two cases on equal pay, emphasising the importance of the new equal payquestionnaire procedure * * * * These two cases are at opposite ends of the financial spectrum.Nelson was a steward employed by a contractor in a hospital to serve meals toprivate patients. She claimed equal pay, comparing her rate to the higher ratepaid to another steward who had transferred from a previous contractor with histerms and conditions protected under TUPE. Nelson was recruited later onCarillion’s standard terms. Barton, however, was a City analyst and her claim related to salary, bonuspayments and stock options which were less favourable than those of a malecomparator. The legal issue common to both cases was where the burden of proof lay insex discrimination and equal pay cases, in particular the impact of the newburden of proof rules introduced into the Sex Discrimination Act in 2001. In Nelson, the Court of Appeal held that the changes made to the SDA by the2001 Burden of Proof Regulations were to codify existing law rather than createany new legal principles. The complainant had to prove facts from which thetribunal could conclude – in the absence of an adequate explanation from theemployer – that they had been unlawfully discriminated against. In the case ofindirect discrimination, a complainant could only do this by establishing therewas a disproportionate adverse effect on one sex. Nelson had failed to do this,as the statistical evidence she relied on was unsafe. This places the onus onthe complainant to produce relevant statistics or other evidence. The Court of Appeal highlighted the usefulness of the new equal payquestionnaire introduced in April as a means of obtaining that evidence. Guidance by the EAT in Barton emphasised tribunals must establish theprimary facts and draw appropriate inferences. An employer’s failure to respondadequately to a questionnaire could also be taken into account. Once thecomplainant shows primary facts from which a conclusion of discrimination couldbe drawn or inferred, the employer must show the treatment was in no way on thegrounds of sex. The EAT said tribunals should expect employers to be able toprovide cogent evidence on such points. It is critical for employers to be able to explain their pay structures andshow they are in no way discriminatory. In Barton’s case, there had beensufficient evidence of sex discrimination to shift the burden of proof to theemployer, but the tribunal had failed to properly analyse the employer’sargument that City bonus systems need to be secretive, or consider whetherthere were objective reasons and a real business need for the pay differences. What you should do – Do not ignore equal pay – it is a hot HR issue. The introduction of thequestionnaire process could lead to more claims in this area – Regularly audit your pay and benefits structures. Identify differences inpay and examine the reasons for these thoroughly. If you think they can bejustified, ensure evidence of the reasons can be presented in any tribunal case.– Implement the EOC Code of Practice on equal pay, in particular ensuringpay structures are transparent. – Alert managers to the new questionnaire procedure. A failure to respond oran evasive reply can count heavily against the employer in any tribunal case. Kvaerner Oil & Gas v Parker & Others, EAT An illustration of the need to consider redundancy selection poolscarefully * * * A tribunal held that the applicants’ redundancy dismissals had beenunfair because the employer had used an unreasonably narrow pool from which toselect candidates. All four employees were employed in the same business unit (FD). At the samesite, their employer had another business unit (MMO). The maintenance workcarried out by the FD unit had reduced, but that carried out by MMO hadcontinued. The employer argued the two business units were identifiably separate and socould be regarded as separate pools for redundancy selection purposes. Itsprevious practice had been that groups of workers dedicated to particular kindsof work would form the relevant redundancy pool if there was a reduction inthat work and therefore its actions were in line with previous custom andpractice. The EAT upheld the tribunal’s decision that the selection pool was toonarrow. The FD unit had begun to take on maintenance work identical to that ofMMO, and there was evidence the work could interchange between the two unitseven though it had been procured under separate contracts. The tribunal hadsubstituted its own view as to the appropriate pool, but had still askedwhether the selection pool was within the range of reasonable responses. Itsconclusion that it wasn’t was not a perverse decision. What you should do – Remember reasonable selection pools are critical to dismissing fairly forredundancy. If the pool is too narrow, the dismissals will be unfair no matterhow fair the selection process or how well consultation is carried out – Consult any recognised trade unions on selection pools – Once you have identified your pool, check there are no employees outsideit who do the same type of work or have interchangeable skills. If they are notto be included, establish a sound reason why not – Be alert to what happens in practice. This case does not mean separatebusiness units cannot be treated as separate pools – the problem was that inpractice, there was little real separation between the business units,particularly in the allocation of work – Don’t fall into the “we’ve always done it this way” trap. Glendale Managed Services v Graham & Others, Court of Appeal An example of contractual flexibility being controlled by the courts * * * Glendale’s employment contracts stated that rates of pay would‘normally’ be in accordance with a national collective agreement and thatemployees would be notified of any changes to terms. The employer failed tohonour national pay awards made in 2000 and 2001. The employees brought claimsof unlawful deductions from wages. The Court of Appeal agreed with the tribunal and EAT that there had been anunlawful deduction from wages. The reference in the contract to rates of paynormally being in accordance with the national collective agreement did allowthe employer some flexibility, but the normal position was that the nationallyagreed rate should apply. There was an implied term that the employer had toinform the employee if it intended to depart from this principle. What you should do – Remember implied terms can limit the amount of flexibility and discretionyou have under a contract – If, under the contract, changes to terms and conditions are made, ensurethese are communicated to the affected employees. UK Coal Mining v Raby, EAT Useful guidance from the EAT on the reasonableness of disciplinarysanctions * * * * Raby was dismissed for gross misconduct, after being involved in afight at work. His opponent was not dismissed. Raby told the investigatingmanager he had used physical force first, although only to the extent oflightly tapping his colleague’s helmet with his own helmet. The applicant alsoalleged his colleague had provoked this by using abusive language to him. The applicant had received a written warning some three or four yearsearlier for another act of misconduct. That warning stated it would be retainedon his record for 12 months. The other participant in the fight had anunblemished disciplinary record. The employer’s disciplinary procedure said awritten warning would be disregarded after one year. The employer argued it was reasonable to dismiss the applicant but not hiscolleague for two reasons: the applicant had admitted he had struck the firstblow, and second, the other participant had a clean disciplinary record. The tribunal, in a split decision, found the applicant had been unfairlydismissed. The EAT upheld that finding. The EAT set out a number of principles to be applied in cases wheredifferent disciplinary sanctions are applied to different employees. Theemployer must consider the case of each employee on its own merits includingany mitigation. It was not unfair to dismiss one employee and retain another,provided there were reasonable grounds for treating the employees differently. Where two employees who have committed the same offence are treateddifferently, the tribunal should ask whether the distinction is within therange of reasonable responses or was so irrational that no reasonable employercould have made it. The EAT agreed with the tribunal’s majority decision that it was notrational to consider which employee had struck the first blow. The blow itself– the tap on the helmet – had not been particularly forceful, and the majorityhad found on the evidence that both men were equally culpable given the verbalprovocation made to the applicant. The EAT also found both men should have beentreated as having a clean disciplinary record since the applicant’s formalwritten warning should have been disregarded entirely. What you should do – Balance the need for consistency in disciplinary sanctions against theneed to consider each case on its own merits – Make sure different treatment can be properly justified – Don’t adopt a “tariff approach”, ie that certain categories ofmisconduct automatically lead to dismissal – Ensure disciplinary records are updated regularly. Case of the month by Christopher Mordue – More troublelooming on holiday pay calculations?Bamsey v Albion Engineering, EATEAT gives leave to appeal on whether overtime counts when totting upholiday pay* * * * * Bamsey’s contract containeda basic working week of 39 hours. He could be required to work nine hours’overtime a week if asked but there was no obligation on the company to providethis overtime. In practice, Bamsey worked an average of around 60 hours a week,but he was only paid holiday pay at 39 hours a week. He argued he should be paid for the hours he actually tended towork when he was not on holiday. This argument would not succeed if the Working Time Regulations1999 (WTR) were interpreted as including the definition of ‘normal hours ofwork’ in section 234 of the Employment Rights Act 1996 (used for calculating aweek’s pay for statutory redundancy purposes), under which non-guaranteedovertime cannot be taken into account. Bamsey’s lawyers argued this workinghours definition was contrary to the purpose of the Working Time Directive(WTD) and was not in any event incorporated into Regulation 16 of the WTR.The EAT agreed it defeated thepurpose of the WTD for Bamsey’s holiday pay to be assessed without taking intoaccount the pay he normally received when working. It was contrary to thehealth and safety objective of the directive – a disparity between actual payand holiday pay could discourage workers from taking holidays. However, the EAT said the regulations could not be interpretedin this ‘purposive’ way – the normal hours of work concept was indirectlyincorporated into Regulation 16. In any event, there would be great practicaldifficulties if the applicant’s argument was accepted: employers would be veryuncertain how they should calculate holiday pay where the amount of overtimevaried; it would be impossible to predict what the employee’s holiday pay wouldbe, and difficult for the employer to provide workers with clear information instatements of main terms and conditions.The EAT did, however, give leave to appeal. This case couldpresent employers with another huge practical headache in relation to holidaypay, and expose them to significant retrospective claims.What you should do– Bear in mind employers in the public sector could face claimsdirectly under the WTD– Private sector employers should follow the appeal closely –the ramifications could be enormous– Audit overtime working – are some employees working excessiveovertime? Can some be worked by other employees?– Remember, the opt-out from the 48-hour working week limit isunder review and could be removed. Prepare to overhaul working patterns thatwould breach the regulations if this happens. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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A comprehensive isotopic investigation of habitat preferences in nonbreeding albatrosses from the Southern Ocean

first_imgAlbatrosses are among the world’s most endangered seabirds. Th reats during the nonbreeding period have major impacts on their population dynamics, but for most species, detailed information on distribution and ecology remains essentially unknown. We used stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N) in feathers to infer and compare the moulting (nonbreeding) habitats of 35 populations that include all the 20 species and subspecies (444 individuals) of albatrosses breeding within the Southern Ocean and in fringing subtropical waters. Isotopic values together with a review of available information show that the 20 albatrosses can be categorized into three groups depending on their favoured moulting grounds: 12 (60%)taxa forage primarily in warm neritic waters, six (30%) in northern oceanic waters and two (10%) in oceanic waters of the Southern Ocean. Stable isotopes indicate that habitat preferences during the nonbreeding period vary much less among different breeding populations in some species (wandering, Salvin’s, grey-headed and light-mantled sooty albatrosses), than others (black-browed, Indian yellow-nosed and sooty albatrosses). The major fi nding of our isotopic investigation is that the great majority of albatrosses spend the nonbreeding period outside the Southern Ocean, with only three species (andin the sooty albatross, just one of the breeding populations) favouring oceanic subantarctic waters at that time. Hence, the study highlights the overwhelming importance of subtropical waters for albatrosses, where the birds are known to interact with human activities and are more likely to be negatively affected by the diverse range of fisheries operating in both neriticand oceanic waters.last_img read more

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RMT demands urgent action as oil and gas workforce falls

first_img RMT demands urgent action as oil and gas workforce falls. (Credit: RMT.) RMT demands urgent action as oil and gas workforce falls by 40% in COVID-19 crisis and global price warOFFSHORE union RMT is demanding urgent and immediate action as operators rush to slash jobs and contracts in response to the Coronavirus emergency and the oil price war which has driven oil to below $25 per barrel.‎ There are reports today that the worforce had fallen by nearly 40%.RMT general secretary Mick Cash said:“Oil and gas companies are unilaterally sending staff home with no regard to their future income, work or health.“Employers have failed to engage with offshore trade unions over standardising the industry’s response to Coronavirus, even when there have been cases diagnosed on North Sea platforms, yet the UK Government stands by and watches thousands of skilled energy workers being dumped without any comment whatsoever.“The Offshore Co-ordinating Group of trade unions and the STUC are meeting the Scottish Energy Minister, Paul Wheelhouse later today. We hope those talks deliver something meaningful.“Those talks also serve to demonstrate the gaping hole in the UK Government’s response to the COVID-19 crisis offshore.” Source: Company Press Release RMT is demanding urgent and immediate action as operators rush to slash jobs and contracts in response to the Coronavirus emergencylast_img read more

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