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Recent HKS graduate Mallika Kaur awarded travel fellowship

first_imgThe Harvard Committee on General Scholarships has awarded Mallika Kaur, M.P.P. ’10 the 2010-11 Sheldon Traveling Fellowship. The competitive fellowship is awarded to one graduate from across Harvard. First nominated by Harvard Kennedy School for this award, Kaur was then selected by the Harvard-wide committee from a pool of applicants from the various graduate schools.Kaur focuses on South Asian human rights and security issues. Her perspectives have been informed by growing up in Punjab and having worked on advocacy efforts in the United States since 2001. She holds a master in public policy from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and a juris doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley. Kaur has worked with underrepresented communities in South Asia as well as in the diaspora.The Sheldon Fellowship will support her travel, study, and writing on gender issues in Indian-administered Kashmir. With heightened international involvement in Afghanistan and Pakistan, South Asian security issues are at the forefront today. Understanding how women are affected by and effect the situation in Kashmir will help deepen an understanding of this crucial region.Kaur concentrated in international and global affairs at Harvard Kennedy School and in international law at Berkley Law School. Under Rory Stewart’s leadership, she helped co-found and serves as the coordinator of the Kashmir Initiative at Harvard Carr Center. The purpose of the initiative is to create an interdisciplinary dialogue around this vital region by involving students, academics, policy makers, Kashmiris and non-Kashmiris. Multilingual and with a commitment to building bridges between disparate ethnic groups, NGOs, and state actors, Kaur continues to work toward promoting inclusive security and democracy.last_img read more

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The threat from superbugs

first_imgAs government and health officials voice growing alarm over the spread of drug-resistant bacteria around the world, a panel of experts on Wednesday recommended steps to address the problem in hospitals, in communities, and across businesses.Experts appearing at the Forum at Harvard School of Public Health recommended a mix of hospital-stewardship programs and community education to fight antibiotic misuse, as well as legal changes that allow pharmaceutical companies to profit longer from new antibiotics to provide economic incentives to develop new drugs.“We’re not coming to the end of the antibiotic era, but we’re in danger of not being able to save lives we should save. We should be able to cure bacterial infections and viruses,” said Stuart Levy, a physician at Tufts University School of Medicine and president of the Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics.Levy took part in a forum discussion called “Battling Drug-Resistant Superbugs: Can We Win?” in the Harvard School of Public Health’s (HSPH) leadership studio in Kresge Hall; it was webcast live. It also featured HSPH epidemiology Professor Marc Lipsitch, director of the HSPH Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics; Aaron Kesselheim, director of the Program on Regulation, Therapeutics, and Law at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital; and Beth Bell, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.The event, produced by the forum in collaboration with WGBH broadcasting and the Public Radio International program “The World,” was moderated by David Baron, health and science editor of “The World.”Since the first alarms were sounded over rising drug resistance in the 1970s, the problem has grown more deadly. Two million people are infected with drug-resistant bacteria each year, and 23,000 die, according to CDC statistics.The problem has a significant economic impact as well, with an estimated $20 billion in excess medical costs and perhaps $30 billion in lost productivity from ailments caused by drug-resistant bugs.It wasn’t always this way. Penicillin, the first antibiotic, revolutionized medical care when it was introduced in the early 1940s, giving physicians a powerful tool to fight infections and ailments caused by bacteria. Other antibiotics arrived, ushering in an era when infection control was seen as routine.But with reproduction times as short as 30 minutes, bacteria are resilient, Lipsitch said. Survivors from an antibiotic treatment rapidly reproduce, passing their resistant genetic makeup to future generations and spreading it in the population. Bacteria also can take up DNA from dead relatives and swap DNA with other living bacteria, giving them an ability to acquire resistance that they didn’t have before.“This is evolution in action,” Lipsitch said.As this process has taken place, economic considerations have caused several major drug companies to stop research into new antibiotics, panelists said. Compared with cancer drugs or health-maintenance drugs like statins, which either have high costs or are taken for long periods of time, antibiotics are inexpensive and typically used for just days or weeks. That means they don’t provide similar financial returns.“It was a rational business decision, but it left a lot of investment and innovation in antibiotic development to smaller companies and academics working in the field,” Kesselheim said.The result is today’s stagnant arsenal of antibiotic drugs, even as more organisms develop resistance to them. Organisms have emerged that are resistant to not just one drug but several, forcing physicians to resort to treatments that are toxic to the bug but also can hurt the patient.Last spring, the CDC sounded the alarm over drug resistance, highlighting three organisms whose threat was urgent: Clostridium difficile, which causes intestinal infections and kills 14,000 people annually; Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which causes gonorrhea, strains of which are resistant to any antibiotic; and carbapenem–resistant Enterobacteriaceae, which causes bloodstream infections and kills 600 annually. The CDC report also highlighted a dozen other resistant bugs that it termed serious, and others of concern.Resistant bacteria are often found in settings where both bacteria and the drugs to fight them are abundant, such as hospitals. But they are increasingly common in the community, with instances of heartbreaking cases of seemingly routine infections growing to life-threatening proportions.The panelists agreed that over-prescribing antibiotics has to stop. Antibiotics are often improperly prescribed, sometimes for infections caused by viruses, which don’t respond to antibiotics. This over-prescription exposes populations of bacteria to antibiotics unnecessarily, fostering drug resistance. Over-prescription occurs even in hospital settings, and Bell said that as much as 50 percent of antibiotic prescriptions in hospitals are unnecessary.Another problem is lack of adherence to prescriptions. When a patient doesn’t complete the entire course of antibiotics, it leaves a small population of hardier bacteria alive to reproduce, which also fosters drug resistance.Antibiotic overuse also extends to agriculture. The drugs are routinely given to livestock, even when healthy, so they grow more quickly. Some 65 percent of chickens and 44 percent of ground beef tested had bacteria resistant to tetracycline, Levy said.To fight problems in usage, panelists suggested establishing stewardship programs at hospitals to raise awareness and foster proper handling and prescribing of antibiotics. In the community, the panelists suggested enhanced monitoring for drug-resistant infections and more education so consumers are aware of the dangers from drug resistance, and also that the solutions are in their hands.Levy said he considers antibiotics “societal drugs” because one person’s improperly taken antibiotic can create another person’s drug-resistant bacterial infection.Consumers can help by not pestering physicians for unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions, panelists said, by completing the drug regimens they do receive, and by taking simple steps, such as washing their hands, to stay healthy in the first place.The other half of the solution, panelists said, is to increase the supply of antibiotic drugs. Because financial incentives to develop antibiotics are poor, the pipeline of new medications to fight bacteria resistant to existing drugs is drying up. Kesselheim suggested extending the time that a pharmaceutical company has exclusive rights to profit from a discovery. This would let them make money on a new drug longer so they can recoup the research and development dollars that go into creating a new antibiotic.“This is a complicated problem, and we need to attack it at different levels,” Bell said. <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMh9Y7gFR2I” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/IMh9Y7gFR2I/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a>last_img read more

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‘Saturday Night Live’ Controversies Through the Years: Photos

first_imgThe moment, while awkward, did not ruin the Ashlee Simpson Show alum’s chances of being invited back. She returned as a musical guest the following year.The same cannot be said for other stars who sparked backlash on the show. Martin Lawrence is among those who have been banned from appearing after delivering a highly controversial monologue when he hosted in February 1994.“I don’t give a damn,” the comedian said during a 2020 appearance on The Breakfast Club. “I’m not banned from SNL. They banned me from NBC at the time for a minute. But then they realized the way it went down wasn’t what they thought and then they sent me an apology letter.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Ashlee Simpson, for one, made her mark in October 2004 when she flubbed her appearance as musical guest. While on stage for her second song of the night, “Autobiography,” a vocal track for “Pieces of Me,” which she had already performed, began playing. She walked off the stage after dancing briefly. Viewers were outraged that she planned to lip-sync.“It’s definitely not difficult to talk about. … That was a very long time ago,” Simpson told E! News in August 2018 when asked about the infamous incident. “It’s something that happened to me, and things in life happen to you and they make you stronger and they make you a better performer, a better person. I think things like that build your character and your strength and it’s how you handle them.”- Advertisement – With live TV, unexpected twists are bound to happen! Saturday Night Live has weathered more than one scandal in its decades-long run, thanks to its format and its entire premise as a sketch comedy show.The NBC series premiered in October 1975 and has become a central source for those who hope to get a laugh out of current events. However, Saturday Night Live has also found itself as the butt of the joke throughout the years due to musical guest snafus, headline-making host choices and more.- Advertisement – Scroll through the gallery below to revisit the biggest Saturday Night Live controversies of all time.last_img read more

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Viola M. Huber, 88, Brookville

first_imgViola M. Huber, age 88, of Brookville, Indiana died Monday afternoon December 16, 2019 at Reid Health in Richmond.Born May 14, 1931 in Franklin County, she was one of three children born to the late Alfred & Mabel A. (Hoff) Huber.Viola worked for many years at FCN Bank in Brookville where she began her career as a book keeper on November 17, 1952, having held various positions, before retiring as V.P. on April 25, 2003. She was a member of the Franklin County Historical Society, chairperson of the Franklin County Heart Association and was previously President of the Bernard Hurst Post #77 American Legion Ladies Auxiliary where she also served as secretary for several years; and served as general chairperson of the annual poppy sales. Viola was also a charter member of the Career Girls Home Ec Club and a former member of the Red Hats Organization.Viola enjoyed bluegrass music and attended the Southern Ohio Indoor Music Festival in Wilmington, Ohio as well as Bill Monroe’s Outdoor Bluegrass Festival in Brown County. She bowled in various tournaments alongside good friend Mary Lorenz when she was a member of the FCNB bowling team. Viola loved to travel to various states and enjoyed cooking and baking for family functions. She is well known for her homemade pies, cakes, noodles and german potato salad. Her homemade cookies were enjoyed at Franklin County blood drives.Survivors include a sister, Sylvia Precht of Blooming Grove, Indiana, a brother, Marvin Huber of Brookville, Indiana. Also surviving are close friends Jerry and Vickie Banks of Florida; their children Brittany Banks and Destin Banks; and grandchildren Cole, Cayman and Campbell Stranahan.Family & friends may visit from 4:00-8:00 P.M. on Friday, December 20, 2019 at Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home, 1025 Franklin Avenue, Brookville.Funeral services will be conducted on Saturday, December 21, 2019 at 11:00 A.M. at Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home and will be officiated by Rev. David Johnston. Burial will follow in St. Jacobs United Church of Christ Cemetery, 29959 Blue Creek Road, Sunman, Indiana.Memorial contributions may be directed to St. Jacobs United Church of Christ Cemetery Fund or the charity of the donor’s choice.  The staff of Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home is honored to serve the Huber family, to sign the online guest book or send personal condolences please visit www.phillipsandmeyers.com.last_img read more

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