Tag: 上海龙凤1314shlf

Press freedom situation is “serious” in Colombia, Cuba and Haiti

first_img Follow the news on Europe – Central Asia News Help by sharing this information RSF_en News June 7, 2021 Find out more “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says to go further On the eve of the second European Union – Latin American nations Summit in Madrid, Reporters Without Borders (Reporters sans frontières, RSF) notes that state of press freedom in three Latin American countries – Colombia, Cuba and Haiti – is serious and that delicate problems have arisen recently in six others – Bolivia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Panama, Paraguay and Venezuela.Since these 33 countries committed themselves at the last such summit, on 28-29 June 1999 in Rio, to “promote and protect all human rights and fundamental freedoms”, RSF calls on European Union member-states to demand that their Latin American partners keep this promise.RSF notes that Cuba is the last country in the region that systematically imprisons journalists and asks the EU states to persuade the Cuban authorities to hold a referendum on democratising the regime and respecting freedom of expression, as called for by the opposition inside the country. This referendum, known as the Varela Project, has recently received the backing of former US President Jimmy Carter during a visit to Cuba.RSF also urges the EU heads of government to end the impunity currently enjoyed by the killers of journalists in Haiti with the complicity of the authorities there by imposing individual sanctions (denial of visas and freezing funds held abroad) on Haitian officials who are blocking the judicial process, including President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan Europe – Central Asia June 4, 2021 Find out more Delicate problems in Bolivia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Panama, Paraguay and VenezuelaIn each of these countries, except for Panama, a journalist has been killed over the past 18 months. The murder of Parmenio Medina, of Radio Monumental in Costa Rica, a country considered a model of respect for human rights, shows the media is not safe from violence anywhere in Latin America. Costa Rica’s civil society is concerned at the authorities’ silence about the progress of the enquiry into the murder. In Paraguay, the killer of Salvador Medina, who was gunned down in January 2001, was tried and convicted, but those who ordered the killing were not touched.Three of the five murders in these countries were connected with the victim’s revelations of corruption or supposed links between politicians and the underworld. In Guatemala, a dozen journalists were threatened or physically attacked for such reasons in 2001. In April this year, another journalist was forced to flee the country after investigating abuses committed by the army during the 1960-96 civil war.The situation has recently deteriorated in Venezuela. Photographer Jorge Tortoza was killed on 11 April this year while covering opposition demonstrations that led to the short-lived soup d’état against President Hugo Chávez. On 10 May, the president of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights deplored the climate of insecurity for the media, fed by inflammatory remarks about journalists made by the president and members of his government.In Panama, using laws that still provide prison terms for “defamation” and “damaging a person’s reputation,” state officials who do not like being criticised keep up a constant legal harassment of the media. Ninety suits against journalists for alleged defamation are currently on the books. On the eve of the second European Union – Latin American nations Summit in Madrid (17-18 May), Reporters Without Borders notes that state of press freedom in Colombia, Cuba and Haiti is serious and that delicate problems have arisen recently in Bolivia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Panama, Paraguay and Venezuela. It calls on the European Union to back the Varela Project in Cuba and take sanction against the haitian President. center_img News Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says 20.5.2002 – European Union hails Cuban dissidents’ referendum planThe European Union has said it approves the “Varela Project” petition recently presented to the Cuban national assembly calling for a referendum to show support for democratic reforms.It said it hoped the action of the dissidents “would be used to open a debate that will lead to a process of peaceful transition to a pluralist democracy and a reconciled Cuban society,” according to a statement issued in Madrid on 20 May. Spain currently holds the EU presidency.The EU called the Varela Project “an important step by Cuban civil society towards introducing the changes Cuba needs and that Cuban society itself wants.” News June 8, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts Serious situation in Colombia, Cuba and HaitiWith five journalists and two media assistants killed over the past 18 months, the plight of the media in Colombia remains dramatic. The main cause is the war between paramilitary groups and communist guerrillas. Things have got worse since the beginning of this year. The main offices of three media outlets have been damaged by bomb attacks, apparently by the FARC (Colombian Revolutionary Armed Forces). During the presidential election campaign, at least three journalists have been threatened and a fourth obliged to flee into exile after having investigated the past of candidate Alvaro Uribe. Five journalists in all have gone into exile abroad so far this year.In Cuba, the Constitution stipulates that the state has a monopoly of the media. Repression of members of independent press agencies the state refuses to legalise is aimed at protecting this monopoly. Cuba, the last dictatorship in the Americas, is also the only country where journalists are systematically imprisoned. Four are currently in jail there. Since the beginning of this year, about 30 arrests or acts of harassment against their colleagues have been recorded and the sale of computers to private individuals has been banned. Access to the Internet is strictly controlled. This sanitised media environment is occupied by the official press, which only puts out material approved by the Department of Revolutionary Guidance.In Haiti, all state institutions are participating in the climate of impunity. The obstacles encountered by the investigation into the April 2000 murder of journalist Jean Dominique, head of Radio Haiti Inter, are proof of this. The police are suspected of involvement in the death of two key suspects. The senate has refused to lift the parliamentary immunity of the chief suspect in the killing, Sen. Dany Toussaint. President Jean-Bertrand Aristide has stepped up reassuring statements but he has covered up for these irregularities. His followers, confident of not being punished either, have increased attacks on journalists who criticise the regime. This culminated last 3 December in the murder of another journalist, Brignol Lindor, and the departure for exile abroad of more than a dozen journalists. RecommendationsRSF calls on European Union countries to persuade their Latin American and Caribbean partner states to respect their commitment made at the previous EU-Latin American summit in Rio to “promote and protect all human rights and fundamental freedoms”.RSF especially asks the EU countries to:- Help fund the programme to protect journalists set up by the Colombian government and press Colombian officials to push ahead in the fight against impunity in the murder of journalists.- Persuade the Cuban authorities to hold a referendum on democratising the regime as requested by opposition groups inside the country. Making use of a clause in the Cuban Constitution, moderate government opponents have delivered to Parliament a petition with the 10,000 signatures required for a referendum to be held. It would be a vote on five points: freedom of expression and association, amnesty for political prisoners, recognising the right to own a business, drafting a new electoral law and, if these points are approved in the referendum, holding free elections within nine months. This opposition initiative, known as the Varela Project, received the backing of former US President Jimmy Carter during his recent visit to the island.- Take individual sanctions against Haitian officials, including President Aristide who, deliberately or by omission, is blocking investigations into the murders of Jean Dominique and Brignol Lindor. These sanctions should include refusing entry and transit visas to EU countries for these officials and their families and the freezing of funds they hold abroad. The list of 24 officials can be seen on RSF’s website (www.rsf.org).- Ask the authorities in Bolivia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Paraguay and Venezuela to investigate the murders of Juan Carlos Encinas (Bolivia), Parmenio Medina (Costa Rica), Jorge Mynor Alegría Almendáriz (Guatemala), Salvador Medina (Paraguay) and Jorge Tortoza (Venezuela), so that those who carried out the murders and those who ordered them are punished. RSF also urges that the Panamanian authorities be pressed to abolish laws providing for jail terms for media offences. Organisation Europe – Central Asia ————————————————————————————————————–16.05.2002 – Press freedom situation is “serious” in Colombia, Cuba and Haiti May 16, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Press freedom situation is “serious” in Colombia, Cuba and Haitilast_img read more

read more

Mural Brings New Life to Habitat for Humanity ReStore, Chisholm Street

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisAlpena — Artist Chad Joseph Szatkowski watched his 12′ by 12′ foot mural receive high praise from community members on Monday afternoon at the Habitat for Humanity ReStore. The organization put out a contest for artist to design a mural in order to beautify the ReStore. Szatkowski’s designs were selected out of a number of submissions.“They had a contest to pick the artist and he was a perfect pick,” said Mayor Matt Waligora.Szatkowski took seven days to create the piece. He merged two of his submissions from the contest to create what people can now see off of the corner of 5th Avenue and Chisholm St. The piece embodies the core values of Habitat for Humanity’s mission. Volunteers took another seven days to put the mural into place and paint the bricks.“It shows everything that Habitat wants to depict to everyone,” said Szatkowski. “When you look at the picture or the mural, I think even children could understand.”The project which was expected to be completed in fall came just in time for the 4th of July. The Community Foundation for Northeast Michigan and Habitat for Humanity both chipped in funds to make the artwork possible. Now, the city will have more beauty for locals and outsiders to enjoy for years to come.“The city has taken a more arts and culture aspect and direction in the past couple years and this obviously adds to that,” said Waligora.People can check out the design over at the Habitat for Humanity Restore located at the corner of 5th Avenue and Chisholm Street.For more information on Habitat for Humanity of Northeast Michigan, visit http://www.habitatnemi.org/AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious Fuel Tanks Leak in the Basement of Mr. Ed’s IGANext What’s Trending for July 2last_img read more

read more

Hughes ponders changes for replay

first_imgMark Hughes is set to make changes for his team’s FA Cup replay against MK Dons – QPR’s second match in as many days.The new manager, an FA Cup winner with Manchester United and Chelsea, will assess the condition of several players ahead of his first home game in charge.He plans to include at least a couple of players who did not feature against Newcastle, with Hogan Ephraim poised for an outing and DJ Campbell also hoping to be involved.“It’ll give me a chance to look at players that didn’t get a chance to influence the [Newcastle] game,” said Hughes.“There won’t be as many changes as people might think though. I always treat the FA Cup with respect – it’s a competition that’s been good to me.”Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

read more

A’s reliever thrives heading into playoffs in most grueling year of career

first_imgANAHEIM — It’s been a trying season for A’s reliever Yusmeiro Petit, both on and off the field.At 92 innings pitched on the year, Petit has already surpassed his total from 2017 with the Angels as he finishes the season set to lead the majors in innings pitched by a relief pitcher for the second consecutive season. The 73 games he’s appeared in are by far the most in his 11 big league seasons.It’s a tough grind on his arm, which at 33 years old still finds a way to get batters out on a …last_img

read more

Who is Mark Stevens, the guy who shoved Raptors guard Kyle Lowry?

first_imgOAKLAND — Before Game 3 of the NBA Finals between the Golden State Warriors and the Toronto Raptors, if Mark Stevens was known for anything, it was probably for his role funding tech and other companies as a venture capitalist in Menlo Park.After Thursday, though, you’ll probably recognize him as the dude who shoved Raptors’ guard Kyle Lowry and got himself barred from all Warriors events for a year — despite being a minority owner of the team.Stevens was banned Thursday from attending any …last_img

read more

South African theatre

first_imgThe Playmakers, a statue by ErnestUllman, reflected in the windows of theJohannesburg Civic Theatre.(Image: Chris Kirchhoff,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more freephotos, visit the image library)South Africa has a vibrant theatrical scene with more than 100 active spaces all over the country offering everything from indigenous drama, music, dance, cabaret and satire to West End and Broadway hits, classical opera and ballet.Venues range from the staid and monolithic homes of the former state-supported performing arts councils to purpose-built theatres, a converted fresh-produce market and casinos.Add to this a multitude of festivals that take place across the country all year round, offering an almost bewildering range of theatrical experiences. The annual National Arts Festival in Grahamstown, the largest festival of its kind in Africa, has in its 33 years spawned a variety of similar festivals such as the Afrikaans-language Klein Karoo Nasionale Kunstefees (KKNK) in Oudtshoorn and the Manguang African Cultural Festival (Macufe) in Bloemfontein.Sections in this article:OriginsCreative outletsTackling apartheidStruggle theatre in the 1970sThe Market TheatreAnger and anguish The presentRelated articlesUseful links OriginsThe origins of South African theatre can be found in the rich and ancient oral tradition of indigenous South Africans – the folk tales around the fires, with their drama, and an audience ranging from the very young to the very old.Performances on stage came much later. The formal South African theatre tradition dates as far back as the 1830s when Andrew Geddes Bains’s Kaatje Kekkelbek or Life among the Hottentots was performed in 1838 by the Grahamstown Amateur Company.Originally, white South African theatre was heavily influenced by 20th-century missionaries, who made an important contribution to a tradition of theatre when they introduced drama in education. Their themes were not only staged versions of biblical teachings but also didactic plays located in South Africa. At Marianhill in the 1920s Father Bernard Hess also encouraged the production of comedies and the dramatisation of Zulu narratives.Theatre began to flourish in the black townships where performance arts became increasingly popular in the 1920s and 1930s. In 1929 the Methethwe Lucky Stars staged productions based on themes of rural life and customs. In 1932 came the Bantu Dramatic Society, which aimed to encourage “Bantu playwrights” and to develop African dramatic and operatic art.The 1930s and the 1940s saw the blooming of the work of Herbert Dhlomo, a teacher, journalist and musician, who was the first South African playwright to make a significant attempt to challenge colonial domination through drama. His work, The Girl Who Killed To Save, was the first published play by a black writer in English. Indigenous theatre continued to develop in the 1940s and 1950s with the formation of organisations such as the Orlando Boy’s Club Dramatic Society. In the townships, particularly in Johannesburg’s vibrant Sophiatown, an eclectic performance culture developed, drawing on American, English and African cultural traditions and involved comic sketches and acting as well as jazz, singing and dancing. The album cover of the original castrecording of King Kong, South Africa’s firstinternational musical hit.Creative outlets During the mid-20th century, theatre for white English-speaking South Africans consisted almost of local (or sometimes imported) versions of plays being performed in England or America. The National Theatre, formed in 1947, did not allow for black creative participation and, although it performed some indigenous Afrikaans plays, only about five of more than 40 plays performed in English were by South Africans. One of the few was Guy Butler, whose play The Dam and the Dove Returns entered the company’s repertoire in the 1950s.In the 1950s, as the apartheid system put a stranglehold on South Africa, some of the country’s major writers, including Lewis Nkosi, Nat Nakasa and Bloke Modisane, were barred from white theatres and their potential contribution to South African was lost.But there were some attempts to provide outlets for emerging black talent. In the 1950s Ian Bernhardt, a member of an amateur society, formed an all-black drama group called the Bareti Players, which drew on the tradition of theatre based on European models. Bernhardt also promoted the Township Jazz concerts that culminated in the production of the all-hit musical, King Kong.Towards the end of the 1950s, a young Port Elizabeth playwright named Athol Fugard made his first impression on the Johannesburg stage with a play entitled No-Good Friday. The play was created with a number of black intellectuals from Sophiatown and opened in 1958 at the Bantu Men’s Social Centre, adjacent to Dorkay House.King Kong opened at the University of the Witwatersrand’s Great Hall in 1959 to multiracial audiences. During a season in London the musical launched stars such as Miriam Makeba and Todd Matshikiza into the international spotlight. Sponono, another musical using black actors and produced by Alan Paton and Krishnah Shah, opened in 1961 in Durban and Johannesburg to much acclaim. Benjy Francis and Fats Bookholane inAthol Fugard’s The Blood Knot(Image: Baxter Theatre)Tackling apartheid As the National Party entrenched itself through all manner of constraints – apartheid legislation, censorship, bannings, media restrictions – theatre was increasingly used as a means of criticising the apartheid state. Plays by white playwrights like Lewis Sowden (The Kimberley Train), Basil Warner (Try for White), David Herbert (A Kakamas Greek) and Athol Fugard (The Blood Knot) tackled aspects of the apartheid system. But few of them were seen in the areas in which the victims of the system lived.South Africa’s black townships were devoid of all amenities apart from the odd sports stadium. Soweto, with a population of more than 1-million in the 1970s, had one nightclub, one hotel, one cinema and two outdoor arenas. Those productions which did tour the townships or which emanated from them were performed in draughty communal or church halls. Nonetheless, in the 1950s and 1960s, a vibrant township theatre movement began to evolve.In the late 1950s Athol Fugard and his wife Sheila began a small theatre group in Port Elizabeth called the Circle Players. Later in the 1960s, Fugard worked with a Port Elizabeth group called the Serpent Players. From its members, the young John Kani and Winston Ntshona, with whom he created Sizwe Banzi is Dead and The Island, which would go on to win international acclaim. In those years the prolific Fugard also wrote Hello and Goodbye and Boesman and Lena.In Durban, Ronnie Govender and Muthal Naidoo founded the Shah Theatre Academy in 1964. In the the-Transvaal, Gibson Kente (1932 – 2004), a South African theatre legend, created a black theatre that did not explore political themes but concentrated on love, adultery, alcoholism and crime. Two of Kente’s young actor/musicians, Percy Mtwa and Mbongeni Ngema, went on to produce one of South Africa’s most phenomenal international successes – the two-hander Woza Albert! The play toured extensively and won numerous awards worldwide.In black areas all over the country theatre groups came and went, many of them snuffed out by the political harassment and sometimes the indefinite detention of their participants. The Theatre Council of Natal (TECON), which was founded in 1969, died with the arrest of three key Black Consciousness leaders who were active in it. The People’s Experimental Theatre (PET) was formed in 1973, but disintegrated when several of its leaders were arrested and charged with treason.Much work was banned either by ministerial decree or by township superintendents who refused to allow it to be performed. One of those to fall foul of the authorities was playwright Maishe Maponya, whose Bahumutsi Drama Group used the Moravian church hall in Diepkloof, Soweto, to bring his work to the township. His Gangsters, however, was considered by the Directorate of Publications to be so “inflammatory” it could only be performed in “small, intimate, four-wall theatres of the experimental or avante-garde type”. Since there were none of those in any township, he sought a home for the play in one of the smaller spaces at the new Market Theatre.Struggle theatre of the 1970s The 1970s saw an intensification of worker and trade union struggle and the student uprising of 1976 which sowed the seeds of the revolution that would result in the birth of democracy in 1994. As repression grew and the voices of political activists were increasingly silenced, theatre became an important means of voicing the protests that were banned from the streets and political platforms of the country.Theatre emanated from the unions, from the Black Consciousness movement, from the collaborative efforts of Fugard, Kani and Ntshona, from Kente, and from a multitude of university and fringe groups. The Music Drama Arts and Literature Institute (MDALI), formed in 1972, sought to “promote self determination, self realisation and self support in theatre arts”. The Shah Theatre Academy in Durban continued to stage plays up to the 1980s, the Imitha Players were founded in East London in 1970, and the Inkhwezi Players emerged in Grahamstown in 1974. Familiar texts and universal themes were adapted to reflect local conditions in a variety of ways.In 1970 Welcome Msomi, collaborating with Peter Scholz and Elizabeth Sneddon, director of the Theatre Workshop Company in Durban, produced Umabatha, a Zulu version of Macbeth, which was performed both in South Africa and at the World Theatre Season in London in 1972. Dorkay House’s Phoenix Players, directed by Barney Simon, staged Phiri, an African jazz musical which placed Ben Jonson’s Volpone in a township setting, while Workshop 71 used Crossroads to present Everyman in township terms. An important theatre group to emerge in the 1970s was the nonracial Junction Avenue Theatre Company, which produced innovative productions such as The Fantastical History of a Useless Man and Randlords and Rotgut.While indigenous theatre was exploding, venues for its performance were not. The state-subsidised Performing Arts Council was not interested in new South African work in English and certainly not interested in anything that challenged apartheid. In 1976, for instance, the only local work to be seen on the stage of the Performing Arts Council of the Transvaal (PACT) was coloured poet Adam Small’s Kanna Hy kô Huistoe.New and innovative venues began to emerge and productions of controversial local work found their homes in various spaces at the University of the Witwatersrand, at the Space Theatre in Cape Town and the Stable Theatre in Durban. After 1976, the Market Theatre in Johannesburg, and, from 1977, the Baxter Theatre on the University of Cape Town campus became popular venues for local productions.The Space, founded in Cape Town by theatre photographer Brian Astbury and his actress wife Yvonne Bryceland, opened in May 1972 and established itself as a defiantly nonracial venue in a racially divided country. The first pioneering fringe theatre in the country, it mounted almost 300 productions starting with the premier of Athol Fugard’s Statements After an Arrest under the Immorality Act. Taken over by Moyra Fine and Rob Amato after Astbury and Bryceland left, it survived as The People’s Space for some two years before succumbing to overwhelming financial pressures. Shelagh Holliday and Marius Weyers inAthol Fugard’s A Lesson from Aloes.(Image: Baxter Theatre)The Market Theatre The Market Theatre was the brainchild of writer and director Barney Simon and producer and administrator Mannie Manim, both of whom had had wide experience of theatre before forming The Company – an independent company committed to nonracial theatre – in 1974. Housed in a former Indian fresh-produce market in Johannesburg’s Newtown, the Market Theatre complex consists of three theatres, the Main Theatre, the Barney Simon Theatre and the Laager Theatre.Like the People’s Space, it defied the Group Areas Act, which restricted theatres in white areas to white people only – both as audience and as actors. From the start the trustees of the Market Theatre Trust opened the stages and the auditoria to all who wished to come there, regardless of race. The Market Theatre also encouraged local playwrights, local performers, and local work, a move would bring it its international reputation and a string of awards as the most exciting and entrepreneurial management in the country.It was to the Market that Fugard would bring his A Lesson from Aloes, Master Harold … and the Boys, The Road to Mecca, A Place with the Pigs, My Children! My Africa!, and Playland. At the Market Barney Simon and his actors would develop in workshop Cincinatti – Scenes from City Life, Call Me Woman, Black Dog Inj’emnyana, Outers, Born in the RSA, and Woza Albert! It was at the Market that Johannesburg theatregoers were introduced to the work of most of South Africa’s leading playwrights and directors, including Welcome Msomi, Zanemvula (Zakes) Mda, Pieter-Dirk Uys, Gibson Kente, Paul Slabolepszy, Mbongeni Ngema, Adam Small, PG du Plessis, Kessie Govender, Bartho Smit, Maishe Maponya, Percy Mtwa, Deon Opperman, Reza de Wet, Matsemela Manaka, and a myriad aspirants.Under the new CEO Sibongiseni Mkhize, artistic director Malcolm Purkey and financial manager Christine McDonald, the Market Theatre has evolved into a cultural complex for theatre, music, dance and the allied arts. The theatre celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2006 with a year-long programme of local and international theatrical productions.Closely linked to the Market was the Baxter Theatre Centre in Cape Town which opened in 1977 under the enthusiastic direction of Irishman John Slemon. It wasn’t long before Slemon, Manim and Simon were discussing collaboration and many of the Market’s successes, some of them directed by Simon, went on to play at the Baxter. In 2001 Manim took over as director of the Baxter.The Baxter also built a relationship with a local township group, the Cape Flats Players, who mainly performed their own original work which would open at the Cape Town theatre and then play at the Market Theatre. Mbongeni Ngema and Percy Mtwa in WozaAlbert!(Image: Baxter Theatre)Anger and anguish In the late 1970s theatre grew as a means of expressing frustration, anger and anguish among communities. At the People’s Space in 1978, and later at the Market Theatre, Imfundiso was produced by the women of Crossroads, the city’s sprawling informal settlement, to dramatise their predicament. Prison was the subject of many of the plays of the 1970s and 1980s, among them Kani, Ntshona and Fugard’s The Island, for which the actors received a Tony Award, as well as Workshop 71’s workshopped Survival and Mbongeni Ngema’s Asinamali.Other works explored the plight of domestic workers (Poppie Nongena), the trauma of black policemen (Bopha!), the role of black women in a South Africa racked by violence (Wathint’ abafazi, wathint’ imbokodo – You Strike the Woman, You Strike the Rock) detention without trial (Four Paces by Two) and security police infiltration (Born in the RSA).The trade union movement also made use of theatre to publicise its problems. In 1979 the Junction Avenue Theatre Company was asked to produce a short play entitled Security, to raise money in support of a strike by the Food and Canning Workers Union. The following year, during a strike at a foundry on the East Rand, a lawyer called in to help defend some of the arrested strikers, conceived a role-play situation to try to reconstruct events. This experiment evolved, with the help of a member of the Junction Avenue Theatre Company, into a production entitled Ilanga Lizophumela Abasebenzi (The Sun Will Rise for the Workers), performed both to workers in factories and to a wider audience at the University of the Witwatersrand.Other productions followed, and during the period 1983 to 1987, thirteen plays were created, many of which played in several parts of the country, one of them also being performed in England.Mbongeni Ngema, who shot to fame with Woza Albert!, immortalised the 1976 student uprising in 1987 with his hit musical Sarafina! The cast of the international hit Umoja inaction on stage.(Image: Umoja)The present The political change in 1994 began to undermine the position of the traditionally white-dominated Performing Arts Councils and with the country’s new freedom came a crisis of identity. No longer could the world be divided into the good (opponents of apartheid) and the bad (proponents of apartheid). Clear lines began to blur, and with the blurring came uncertainty. South Africa’s vibrant cultural life began to become less vibrant. Uncertain what to write, many of the country’s leading playwrights grew silent and new work was thin on the ground.But with the new century under way, the pendulum is swinging back, and, in nurseries like the Market Theatre Laboratory, the Liberty Theatre on the Square, Saturday Children’s Theatre Workshops, the Cape Town Theatre Lab, the National Children’s Theatre, new shoots of talent are burgeoning and blooming, nurtured by events like the Market’s Community and Young Writers’ Festivals. Many new names are being added to the role call of South African playwrights – Lesego Rampolokeng, Xoli Norman, Mondi Mayepu, Heinrich Reisenhofer and Oscar Petersen, Fiona Coyne, Mark Lottering, Nazli George, Craig Freimond, and Rajesh Gopie – creative, innovative and serious about theatre.In Johannesburg, new theatres recently opened up to the public. The Alexander Theatre in Braamfontein, Umoja ‘s Victory Theatre in Orange Grove and the Teatro at Montecasino, which opened to host The Lion King in May 2007, are new additions to the 20 or so theatres already in existence in the city.A new state-of-the-art theatre currently under construction in Soweto is scheduled to open in 2012.Some of the plays are still frequently raw and angry and ragged, but now they encompass themes that would, in earlier years, have been considered irrelevant. Love, religion, family violence, homosexuality, drugs and more are explored in works that engage and involve their audiences. Importantly, too, works that in the 1970s were new, shiny and innovative have, 30 years on, become classics. A revival of Woza Albert! in 2001 evoked the same hilarity and recognition as the original, even though the young audience had no personal memory of its frame of reference.As importantly, young people are beginning to come to the theatre as audiences. New venues, like Cape Town’s Warehouse and the Fugard Theatre which opened in 2010 in District Six, encourage young audiences, with a range of fresh theatre that includes both original South African and innovative imported work. Also in Cape Town, the High Street Theatre presents a rich programme of mainly Afrikaans South African work, mixed with South African, mainly Afrikaans, cabaret entertainments.  Collaborations, co-produced by Artscape with the Cape Town Theatre Lab, gives new South African work a one-week season in the Arena theatre in the Artscape complex. Artscape also stages community-type festivals. Audiences, though, sadly still tend to reflect the demographics of the company on the stage.The late Barney Simon and John Kani opened the Market Theatre Laboratory in 1989 with seed money from the Rockefeller Foundation. The Laboratory, the training and development wing of the Market Theatre, fosters and develops young acting talent. Even in the once-conservative Free State, the Performing Arts Centre has transformed its activities to involve and develop exciting regional talent in all fields of performance.The most exciting cultural explosion of all is from the communities themselves, observes the vice-chairperson of the Theatre Managements of South Africa, Des Lindberg. In the remote North West province, for instance, a theatrical tradition has “flourished and grown and drawn audiences in a way which is the envy of other provinces”. In the Western Cape, flourishing theatre group From the Hip: Khulumakahle, a mixed deaf-hearing ensemble, uses theatre to break down barriers between the hearing and deaf sectors of the population.Before democracy, there was an explosion of community theatre groups in townships that shaped political agendas. However, some sectors have decried that today, community theatre faces stiff competition from mainstream theatre and is plagued by mismanagement and lack of funds. The Market Theatre Laboratory, in an effort to revive community theatre, runs a community theatre festival every year “to provide a space for indigenous South African works to be staged”.With the gradual introduction of theatre studies into the school syllabus, there is hope that the next generation will be enticed away from television and computer screens and back into theatre seats.Related articles South African artSouth African musicSouth African literatureSouth African EnglishUseful links National Arts Council of South Africa Arts Link South African Community Theatre Association South African Theatre Initiative Major theatres Artscape Theatre (Cape Town) Barnyard Theatres (nationwide) Baxter Theatre Centre (Cape Town) Fugard Theatre (Cape Town)Johannesburg Civic Theatre Market Theatre (Johannesburg) On Broadway (Cape Town) Playhouse Company (Durban) State Theatre (Pretoria) Theatre on the Square (Johannesburg) Major arts festivals Aardklop Arts Festival (Potchefstroom) Arts Alive (Johannesburg) Gariep Kunstefees (Kimberley) Klein Karoo Nasionale Kunstefees (Oudtshoorn) Macufe (Bloemfontein) National Arts Festival (Grahamstown) Wits Arts and Literature Experiencelast_img read more

read more

December Geocacher of the Month Nominees – Add Your Comment

first_imgGeocaching team Ralph en ThomasRalph en ThomasThis geocaching duo is responsible for a lot of smileys, both on maps and on faces. Their creative geocache hides run the gamut from a beautifully crafted trackable hotel in a surprising locations to an electronically marvelous and well-favorited night-cache that’ll send chills down your spine.T-Team! says, “In the local geocaching community (Noord Brabant, The Netherlands), Ralph and Thomas are famous for their fantastic caches. They have made many caches with 100+ favorite points and several in the top of the Netherlands.The caches are usually a fun way to be opened combined with an AHAAA moment…. Their latest multi-night-cache (GC5BP0T) has been online for just over 1 month… and already has 100+.”“Finally, they continuously take care of their caches and do regular (night) checks on them. This ensures that everyone can continue to enjoy their work. There are not many cache-makers who can make you smile as they do. For this reason they deserve to be the Geocacher of the Month!”Starkiller_, taking geocaching to new heights.Starkiller_Starkiller_ has found just over 9000 geocaches, so it’s no wonder he’s got something to teach others. This geocacher organizes and hosts a monthly workshop for geocachers interested in leveling-up their game through third-party software, advanced GPS maps and functions, or just by tackling more difficult puzzle-caches. Some months he even brings in guest speakers to host a workshop on a new topic…birdwatching while geocaching, anyone?Starkiller_ has even worked with Ontario municipalities and conservation authorities to help manage geocaching in their areas. Not to mention the fact that he created a “Geo-Passport” which takes geocachers on a geocache tour through the South Nation watershed in Ontario. At the end of the tour, you’ll have learned something about the natural heritage features in the area, and will have earned a specially designed geocoin.Waterlillimm says, “With a personality as big as his name, Starkiller_ is a physical and mental challenge to many Geocachers here in Ontario. While holding such high standards, he teaches us how to enjoy our Earth and Sky and all the beauty & fun that it can hold. If he is not attending a Geocaching Event, he is planning one. If he is not searching for a Geocache, he is creating one, if he is not showing us “how to cache” he is caching along side us. To be as considerate and as passionate of Geocaching as Starkiller_ is, we feel that he deserves the honour of being Geocacher of the Month.”The Seastars at their favorite zone.seastar255This geocaching team is responsible for 13 successful and well-attended CITO (Cache In, Trash Out) events in the Space Coast of Florida. You might even call some of their events “CITO+” (or über-CITO?), for their outside-the-box initiatives (trail maintenance, invasive species removal, etc.). They’ve even teamed up with local environmental organizations to put geocachers to work where they’re most needed.Mother Earth isn’t the only thing getting kind attention from seastar255–their local geocaching community has felt their impact as well. Says Team Mollymap, “Seastar255 is the heart and soul of the Space Coast geocachers. This husband and wife team along with their daughter, Young Money Girl (YMG), have hosted 55 events in our community and counting. Not only are they the host and hostess with the most-est they also make awesome field puzzles, mysteries, and nothing beats a YMG hand decorated ammo can. If you need something this team is there for you, they support you but also encourage you to grow and learn new things for yourself. They have been a great mentor to us along with scores of other geoachers from the Space Coast. Cache-on Seastar255 and Young Money Girl!”Comment below to tell us who you think should be the November Geocacher of the Month. We will be accepting comments through January 25th.  The earned, never for sale, Geocacher of the Month GeocoinThis month’s nominees for the very special Geocacher of the Month award take the geocaching cake for their contributions to the game we love.Among them are a geocaching icon who hosts regular geocaching workshops for ‘cachers new and old, a husband and wife team who are the heart and soul of geocaching on the Space Coast of Florida, and a geocaching duo whose 27 geocaches have received an incredible 2949 favorite points in total.The decision won’t be easy. Luckily, we have you to help. Post your vote below and let us know who you think should take home the earned, never for sale, Geocacher of the Month Geocoin (at left).Mr Donut WP, November’s Geocacher of the MonthAlthough all the nominees will receive prizes, the featured Geocacher of the Month will receive the exclusive special edition Geocoin, a Geocacher of the Month hat and a profile icon. They’ll also receive a certificate that recognizes their contributions, signed by two of the founders of Geocaching.com.Mr Donut WP was the official Geocacher of the Month for November 2014. StridentUK says: “A real lynchpin of the local caching community, organizing many excellent events each year, Mr Donut’s enthusiasm and passion for caching and definitely make him worthy of the Cacher of the Month award.”Now  it’s your turn to decide which geocacher should be further recognized. Read the profiles of this month’s three nominees, and write a supportive comment below this post describing why you think this person should be recognized.A panel from Geocaching HQ will then use your comments to help guide the decision of which geocacher is awarded the Geocacher of the Month honor.Here are your nominees for December 2014 Geocacher of the Month. Know an outstanding geocacher who should be recognized? Nominate them for next month’s award!Share with your Friends:Morecenter_img SharePrint RelatedHelp Name the April 2015 Geocacher of the MonthApril 29, 2015In “Community”Announcing the November Geocacher of the MonthDecember 31, 2013In “Community”Announcing the October Geocacher of the MonthDecember 6, 2013In “Community”last_img read more

read more

The Passive House Conference in California Is Where It’s At!

first_imgThe 9th annual North American Passive House Conference is less than a month away. You knew it’s going to be in California, right?It’s unfortunate that the other Passivhaus group has chosen to use the same name that the Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS) has been using since 2006, but I’ve already discussed that confusion. (Full disclosure: I am on the board of directors of PHIUS.)All you need to know is that the main passive house conference is in California, not in Maine. And here’s why you ought to get yourself registered for it ASAP. 5. We have a pirate!OK, Adam Cohen isn’t really a pirate. Anyway, he denied it when Joe Lstiburek asked him if he was one last year at the conference. But he is one smart and committed Passivhaus designer in Virginia. You can read a bit about him in this article by Martin Holladay, which is also where the following quote comes from:“There are tons of things in the PHPP that I don’t agree with. I know that a building doesn’t work with the PHPP defaults. Energy modeling is 25% science, 25% experience, 25% art, and 25% voodoo.”What more do you need! The 9th annual North American Passive House Conference is really where it’s at! And of course the Bay Area is a lovely place to visit, too.See you there! RELATED ARTICLES More Information on the Passive House Conference in San FranciscoRegistration Is Open for Maine Passive House ConferenceWUFI Is Driving Me Crazy The breakout sessions are where you get to hear about what’s working and what’s not. Builders, architects, engineers, and certified passive house consultants, all will be sharing their experience with Passivhaus projects they’ve been working on. 3. Climate-specific Passivhaus standardsDo you know what the most frequently given answer is to just about any applied building science question? “It depends.”The original Passivhaus standard, developed in Germany, hasn’t worked so well here in North America, mainly because its rigidity doesn’t hold up to our greater climate variation. Kat Klingenberg did a great job explaining all this in her article at Green Building Advisor earlier this year, so that’s a good place to learn more.PHIUS has been working with Buildilng Science Corporation to develop climate-specific standards and open things up a little bit here. On the first morning of the main conference, those new standards will be unveiled. 2. Pre-conference sessionsI’ll be learning WUFI Passive this year with Prudence Ferreira and Mattias Pazold. Other pre-conference sessions include:PHIUS + Rater: Taught by John Semmelhack and Terry Brennan, this designation gets HERS raters involved in Passivhaus projects.Domestic Hot Water Design: Gary Klein is the guru of hot water.Passive Building Science Fundamentals: Dr. Joseph Lstiburek.With one exception, the cost to attend these sessions is insanely low. 1. Great speakers and presentationsBill Rose, author of one of my favorite building science books, Water in Buildings, will give the opening keynote address. The smart, funny Achilles Karagiozis will give the closing keynote. Here are a few other notable presenters and presentations:Terry Brennan – Multifamily QA/QCSam Rashkin, Kat Klingenberg, & Graham Wright – New climate-specific standardsIain Walker & Brett Singer – Ventilation & IAQChris Benedict – Newest market rate multifamily project in NYCJoe Lstiburek – Multifamily ventilation design Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, energy consultant, RESNET-certified trainer, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. Check out his in-depth course, Mastering Building Science at Heatspring Learning Institute, and follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard. 4. Dynamic energy modelingClimate-specific standards aren’t the only thing that distinguishes PHIUS from the followers of the German PHI. The main tool of PHI is the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP), which is an Excel spreadsheet with all the calculations you need to model a Passivhaus project. But the PHPP gives you only a static look at what’s going on. WUFI Passive incorporates the hygrothermal modeling of WUFI along with the load calculations necessary for Passivhaus design. (Be sure to see Adam Cohen’s quote about PHPP below.)PHIUS certifies Passivhaus projects using either tool, and you can learn more about the dynamic modeling of WUFI Passive at the passive house conference in California.last_img read more

read more

How to Make Strategic Decisions in Sales

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now The question asked of me last week was this: “How do you think about making the right decision in sales?”There is no way you can know with absolute certainty what the right decision is before you make it. But there are ways that you can do a better job of making decisions in sales—or in any other area of life. The challenge is in not getting wrapped around the axle and committing to a course of action before you have had a chance to think things through.The way to make good decisions is to first consider your options. Once you have identified all your choices, you can weigh them against each other to determine which choice you believe will allow you to achieve the result you want. More choices improve your chances of success while believing there is only one course of action limits your chances.Let’s assume you are calling on your dream client, and their gatekeeper decides to lock you out, forbidding you from gaining access to the contact with whom you need to meet.You might decide that you are going to do any one of the following:Contact the client directly. A decision worth considering, even if it comes with the downside risk of alienating the gatekeeper and making an enemy.Identifying and pursuing a new contact. Another reasonably good choices depending on the context. The downside risk here is that word gets back to the contact and their gatekeeper and you end up bringing negative attention to yourself.Identifying someone who can make an introduction. Maybe you have a shared contact that would be generous enough to make an introduction. This might be especially valuable if you have done good work for this person and they’d like to do this for you.Enlisting the client as an ally. Maybe the best thing to do is try to win the gatekeeper’s heart and mind, enlisting their help in your cause, proving you create value, and making them look good in the process.There are still more choices available to you, like having someone else on your team work on access through another channel. From the small number of facts and clues, it’s still difficult to make a good decision, but with a little context, a good choice becomes clear. If your best client used to work for the contact you are pursuing, the decision is easier to make. If you have another contact that has engaged with you, that might make taking a different path a better option.The key to making good decisions is to first start by identifying your options before you make a decision and act.last_img read more

read more

James’ 37 lead Cavaliers past Thunder

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James (23) drives past Oklahoma City Thunder forward Paul George (13) during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)OKLAHOMA CITY — LeBron James scored 37 points, and the new-look Cleveland Cavaliers got a much different result this time against the Oklahoma City Thunder in a 120-112 victory on Tuesday night.It was Cleveland’s second straight win since adding George Hill, Rodney Hood, Jordan Clarkson and Larry Nance Jr. in trades, and their fourth straight victory overall.ADVERTISEMENT Read Next Thunder: Visit the Memphis Grizzlies on Wednesday. LATEST STORIES Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Kane leads Spurs’ recovery in 2-2 draw at Juventus John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding The Thunder trimmed their deficit to five in the final minute and could have come closer, but Alex Abrines missed a 3-pointer, and Nance got free for a dunk to seal the win for Cleveland.The Cavaliers led 62-57 at halftime. James had 16 points, four rebounds and five assists, and Smith had 15 points on five 3-pointers. Adams scored 15 points before the break for Oklahoma City.TIP-INSCavaliers: A double foul was called on Nance and Oklahoma City’s Raymond Felton after they got tangled up in the second quarter. … Cleveland shot 54 percent in the first half and 51 percent overall. … Committed just seven turnovers.Thunder: Westbrook was issued a technical foul in the first quarter. It was his 12th of the season. … Had just two turnovers in the first half. … Outrebounded the Cavaliers 51-41.UP NEXTCavaliers: Host the Washington Wizards on Feb. 22.ADVERTISEMENT NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting AFP official booed out of forum Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games PLAY LIST 00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City View comments Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH J.R. Smith added 18 points for the Cavaliers, who lost to the Thunder 148-124 on Jan. 20 with a very different roster.Paul George scored 25 points and Carmelo Anthony 24 for the Thunder. Steven Adams added 22 points and 17 rebounds, and Russell Westbrook scored 21 points. Westbrook and Anthony had missed the past two games with sprained ankles.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutJames scored 14 points in the first five minutes of the third quarter, including two 3-pointers, to give Cleveland a 78-68 lead. He was 6 for 6 from the field during that stretch. The Thunder responded with an 8-0 run to get back into the game. Cleveland took a 91-87 edge into the fourth quarter.The Cavaliers took control in the fourth, and a layup by James after driving on George pushed the Cavaliers ahead 115-106 with 49 seconds to play. MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMClast_img read more

read more