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Warrens Bakery unveils new site in Bicester

first_imgWarrens Bakery is continuing its rapid expansion across the UK with a new store opening today (28 March) in Bicester, Oxfordshire.Located in Pioneer Square, Crown Walk, the store will stock the bakery’s range of breads and hand-crimped pasties, as well as sweet and savoury treats. It is opening in partnership with local businessman Robert Crompton and has created eight new jobs for local residents.“We have a sit-in experience with a large and comfortable seating area, wi-fi, music and somewhere to rest your feet; other bakeries in the area do not offer this,” said Crompton.The Bicester store is part of Warrens Bakery’s plans to increase its presence, with 300 new sites opening over the next five years. Recent additions to its portfolio include Taunton, Winchester and London’s Devonshire Row and New Street Square.“We are delighted to be opening our 15th franchise store, this time in the thriving market town of Bicester,” said Rachel Little, marketing manager at Warrens Bakery. “Our Bicester store will begin with the addition of products inspired from Around the World, offering customers the chance to try exclusive pasty flavours – each for two weeks only – throughout the season, as well as a new mouth-watering range of delectable cakes and other sweet treats.”The Around the World range, which rolled out earlier this month, includes pasties inspired by the flavours of Mexico, Morocco and Italy.NPD has been a focus of Warrens recently with products including a vegan pasty range, Sunday roast in a pasty and the lower-calorie Good Taste Range, which comes in at under 400 calories.last_img read more

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Teslim Balogun Stadium ready in December – Sports commission

first_imgRelatedPosts Photo: Petroleum Minister, Shell MD, others at Nigeria Oil and Gas Industry Games Runners collect kits for Lagos Marathon 2020 Lagos tasks residents on religious tolerance, hard work The Director-General of the Lagos State Sports Commission Oluwatoyin Gafar, says the Teslim Balogun Stadium in Surulere, which is under renovation, would be ready in December. Gafar disclosed this in an interview with the News Agency of Nigeria on Wednesday in Ilorin. The commission’s director general, who said the level of work done was at between 75 and 80 per cent completion stage, expressed confidence that the contractor would meet the December delivery date. He said: “I was at the stadium recently with the Honourable Minister and with what I saw, the stadium should be delivered at the due date. “All other materials are there, the turf, everything is almost readily available.” He said Lagos was ready to host the world if given the right to host the female World Cup by FIFA. He said: “If Lagos is ready, it means Nigeria is ready.”Tags: Oluwatoyin GafarTeslim Balogun Stadiumlast_img read more

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Hidden wounds: After a slew of unpublicized injuries derailed Syracuse last year, the program makes adjustments to stay healthy in 2012

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Each time the scene is the same. Doug Marrone alongside an injured Syracuse football player, a doctor nearby and the young man’s parents on speakerphone.The doctor is the bearer of bad news, his findings the cause of the room’s dejection. Time after time, Marrone sat through that phone call during the 2011 season. So often that he and the players began to question their luck.Eleven players — or more than 10 percent of the active roster — suffered concussions last season with a frequency that surprised the coaching staff, Marrone said in an extended interview. Other injuries, many of which have not been made public until now, also piled up, and 10 of the 11 starters on defense dealt with serious ailments in the latter stages of the year.“We were very banged up,” said Mikhail Marinovich, a defensive end on the 2011 team who has since graduated. “A lot of guys, including myself, weren’t even in a lot of practices and just kind of played the day before and then game day.”The injury problem was the principal hindrance during the five-game losing streak that closed out the 2011 season. A stout run defense became porous, and the offense slipped in productivity as the team went into a tailspin. It forced Marrone and his staff to alter certain elements of the team’s strength training and on-field practice habits going into 2012, with the ultimate goal being a more controlled environment that should produce a healthier season.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“What I did when the season was over is I went out and researched the amount and type of plays that we needed to be successful and all this quality control,” Marrone said. “And I just felt that we as a coaching staff should change up what we’re doing.“We hope that will help us not get as many of the types of injuries that we’ve been getting.”UNDER THE RADARLaunch interactive graphic ‘You won’t hear about it’Since age 4, Dan Vaughan was a wrestler. He spent 15 years of his life on the mat developing the keen neck strength that is both necessary within the sport and a by-product of its movements.Now a graduate student entering his fifth season at linebacker for Syracuse, his muscular development from wrestling is an advantage in the battle against concussions. Years of putting his head down on the mat and manipulating his neck to build strength and counter opponents puts him at a lower risk for a concussion.It’s a correlation that has been embraced by Marrone and his staff, and special strength drills in the weight room began last spring to improve players’ neck strength.“We do some stuff in the weight room where you go up against someone’s knee, and you’re constantly going back and forth,” offensive lineman Justin Pugh said. “We’ll be on all fours, and someone will put their knee out, and you push your head up against it in and out.”Vaughan said another exercise has one player move his head in different directions while it is held by a partner in various positions to strengthen the entire circumference of the neck.Both Vaughan and Pugh struggled to name any of the 11 players who suffered concussions a season ago. They mentioned Adam Harris, a starting fullback in 2011 who saw his career end due to multiple concussions, but backup center Ian Allport was the only other player they named.Pugh said players are not made aware of their teammates’ injuries, and trainers don’t share information when asked. Vaughan added that only severe concussions are made public to the team, and it’s very easy for a player to sit out of practice a few days and return without any explanation.“Unless a guy comes out and says it, you won’t hear about it,” Pugh said.Marrone said the early results are positive, but the full test will come once the regular season gets underway. He said Syracuse made it through spring practice without a concussion or any concussion symptoms, and the players showed improvement when their neck strength was tested prior to the start of preseason camp.“The coaches and the medical staff, we all take injuries seriously, but especially concussions,” Marrone said. “ … We all have a high awareness for it.”Pugh said the other major change for the 2012 season is the extra time spent by the coaching staff instructing players on the proper tempo of each drill. Players weren’t on the same page last year, he said, when it came to how hard each drill was supposed to be run.It’s something Marrone said he addressed with his coaching staff during the summer to make some alterations for this year’s preseason camp. The goal was to avoid the dangerous game of one-upmanship that Pugh described as essentially part intensity and part self-defense.“If we’re going (at a speed) where you’re not actually hitting somebody, we’re not going to have guys lowering their heads thinking, ‘He might come full speed, so I have to go full speed,’” Pugh said.“It’s kind of like this thing where it’s one-up, one-up, one-up until it gets to a level that’s too high.”‘It’s kind of like a battery’Week after week, Marinovich struggled to sleep the night before a game. Two to three hours at most was all he could manage, struggling to get comfortable and relax. Nerves weren’t the issue — his back was.Marinovich said he “was hurt all year” and played the entire 2011 season with three herniated discs and a bulging disc in his back.“In the hotel rooms I slept on the floor, slept on the ground,” Marinovich said. “It was a nightmare.”Marinovich was one of five former seniors on the 2011 team who discussed at length the additional injury problems — outside of concussions — that plagued the Orange defense and derailed a once-promising season. Every starter except safety Phillip Thomas, who was dismissed from the team for a violation of team rules after 10 games, played through a moderate to serious injury while the media and fans were, for the most part, unaware.Marinovich listed off the walking wounded with ease and named almost all 11 players on the defense. The injuries to Chandler Jones (knee), Keon Lyn (shoulder, hand), Jay Bromley (hand) and Ri’Shard Anderson (hand) were obvious, as their braces and casts were visible during games.But it was players like Deon Goggins (major shoulder problems), Dyshawn Davis (dislocated shoulder), Shamarko Thomas (partially torn hamstring) and Dan Vaughan (severely strained oblique muscle) who gutted out the season while shrouding their true statuses.Cory Boatman, a backup defensive tackle who rotated in with Goggins and Bromley, was forced to wear a molded brace on his right wrist during games to prevent it from bending backward and to limit the severe swelling.“I just knew that a lot of guys were banged up,” Boatman said. “We would talk in the locker room and be like, ‘Dang, I’m not feeling it this practice.’ But we would go out there and compete.”A group that allowed just 99.4 rushing yards per game through a 5-2 start sprung leaks over the final five games. Syracuse was continuously carved apart by opponents’ rushing attacks to the tune of 168.4 yards per game during that stretch, including a 37-17 loss to South Florida when it gave up 236 yards on the ground.Marinovich said his practice time was limited to the point where he sometimes only participated in the walkthrough before taking the field on game day. Other weeks he would practice sporadically, but there was rarely more than a day or two in between games.Harris said it was difficult at times for the offense to get the necessary looks it needed against a first-team defense where only a handful of starters actually practiced and others were playing at only 75 to 80 percent at best.“It’s funny because you go into those games and you think, ‘All right, well, I’ll recover by next week,’” Marinovich said. “But it’s kind of like a battery, and you just keep going lower and lower and lower until finally something gives.”Marinovich’s back finally did give when he was speared by a Cincinnati tight end 30 yards away from the ball in the second-to-last game of the season. It was the end of his Syracuse career and another casualty for the defense.‘Never crossed my mind’Naturally, the questions poured in as the losses added up. A defense that allowed only one 75-yard rusher in the first seven games of the season allowed six in the final five games.But the same players were going out there each week. It didn’t make sense. And Marrone was peppered with criticism and inquiries from the media.What is going on with the defense? Why can’t you stop the run? What are you going to do differently?“There’s plenty of times where he would like to just come out and say, ‘This player or this player or this player,’” Marinovich said. “But he’s got integrity. He’s an honest guy, and I think he’s a hell of a coach.”Marrone protected his players, opting not to stand at the podium and disclose injuries to the media when all five former players said it would have been easy to. They lauded him for it, calling him a true players’ coach.And after the season, when Marrone was again presented with an opportunity to explain exactly the type of medical hardships the 2011 Orange team faced, he declined once more.“It really never crossed my mind to get up there and start listing off injuries and ‘woe me’ and ‘woe this team,’” Marrone said.He said excuses — no matter when they are made — don’t help win football games.Instead, he created a plan to overcome the outburst of injuries that essentially crippled an entire season. Whether it works is still to be seen, but the adjustments have been made in an attempt to avoid another health meltdown.Now he just hopes that good fortune is on his team’s side.Said Marrone: “I give a lot of credit to those players. They went out there and played as hard as they could.” Comments Published on August 29, 2012 at 7:00 pm Contact Michael: [email protected] | @Michael_Cohen13center_img Related Stories Multiple fronts: Ashton Broyld gives Syracuse a new offensive weapon who can attack defenses from a variety of positionsIn the clear: Marcus Sales enters the 2012 season refocused and rededicated to football following his season-long suspensionOn the bright side: In his first season at Syracuse, veteran coach Donnie Henderson aims to turn the struggling secondary aroundNo rush: Without a clear-cut starter after preseason camp, Syracuse head coach Doug Marrone will weigh his options at running back during the seasonBack on the warpath: Florida State poised to return to championship discussion behind swarming defenselast_img read more

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Historian speaks about Native American genocide

first_imgThe USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research hosted Benjamin Madley Tuesday to speak about the controversial murder of as many as 16,000 Native Americans by vigilantes, state volunteer militiamen and U.S. Army soldiers during the period between 1846 and 1873. Madley, an Associate Professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles, recently published An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846-1873 after conducting research on the topic of Native American history. He used the 1948 United Nations Genocide Convention to define genocide and then prove, with historical evidence, how the removal of tens of thousands of California Native Americans during and after the Gold Rush by the United States government was an act of genocide. In order to accurately depict the historical events, Madley spent over a decade looking for relevant details to complete the stories in various archives in libraries and by visiting a variety of Native American tribes who have passed down stories through generations. The purpose of Madley’s work is to raise awareness of this genocide so reparations can be made for the generations affected.  “It’s time for state and federal officials to acknowledge the genocide that happened here in California under United States rule,” Madley said. When asked about the inspiration for his research topic, Madley relayed a story about his childhood and how his experiences growing up shaped his interest in Native American history.“I spent a lot of time in Karuk Country growing up where my father worked with Karuk people in Northern California,” Madley said. “So, at an early age, I was exposed to conflicts between natives and newcomers. Then, I came down to Los Angeles in high school and attended University High where the Indian mascot discussion was beginning and where students were discussing the fact that we were taking classes on ancient Tongva village site. That’s when I began to wonder ‘Where are all the Indians?’ But I only really began deeply investigating California Indian history in graduate school.”Madley’s work and passion for genocide reflects the overall purpose of the USC Shoah Foundation to provide curious students with the resources and opportunities to pursue higher learning in the field of genocide. The USC Shoah Foundation was first founded by Steven Spielberg in 1994 to collect and preserve testimonies of Holocaust survivors. Since then, the organization has expanded to collect testimonies from other major international tragedies, including the Rwandan, Armenian and Mayan genocides. Wolf Gruner, the founding director of the foundation, established the Center for Advanced Genocide Research to raise awareness of the work that is being done in the field of genocide. Gruner, in an attempt to encourage interdisciplinary research on genocide, also provides fellowships and internships to bring scholars to USC and encourage USC scholars to research various genocides using the foundation’s extensive database of testimonies and information.last_img read more

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DONEGAL WOMAN BECOMES FOCAL POINT OF AER LINGUS PROTESTORS

first_imgA Donegal woman has become an unlikely hero after taking her baby on a protest march.Aer Lingus cabin crew member Anne Gillespie was pictured in several national newspapers taking her young child in a buggy during the action at Dublin Airport.Ms Gillespie was part of more than 300 crew who walked to the airline’s head office where a letter was handed in to the airline’s chief executive, Christopher Mueller, on behalf of staff. Staff are furious after new working rosters were introduced across the board at the company.The airline has sent more than 140 letters to cabin crew warning them that those who refuse to co-operate will be sacked.In the letter to management Aer Lingus staff said they were loyal to the company but were also loyal to their families.They say the new working rosters will simply make it impossible to have a normal family life. EndsDONEGAL WOMAN BECOMES FOCAL POINT OF AER LINGUS PROTESTORS was last modified: January 22nd, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Shoal Lake First Nation residents weep as Ottawa balks at funding road

first_imgThe Canadian PressSHOAL LAKE, Man. – A reserve under one of Canada’s longest boil-water advisories is promising to stop the planned expansion of the Trans-Canada Highway after Ottawa refused to commit to help build a road connecting it with the outside world. A Manitoba cabinet minister and the deputy mayor of Winnipeg both announced a commitment Thursday to fund part of the cost of a permanent, all-weather road for Shoal Lake 40 First Nation. But Natural Resources Minister Greg Rickford refused to say whether the federal government would put up its share of the cost and left community members openly sobbing with disappointment. Stewart Redsky says the First Nation has waited 100 years for justice as he wept in frustration. Chief Erwin Redsky says his people will not support the twinning of the Trans-Canada over the Ontario-Manitoba boundary as long as his community remains without hope. Shoal Lake 40 was cut off from the mainland a century ago to build an aqueduct to supply Winnipeg with fresh water. It has been under a boil-water advisory for 17 years and has no all-weather road connecting it to the mainland. All three levels of government have put up $1 million each for a design study of the road, called Freedom Road by residents, but Ottawa won’t promise to help fund construction.last_img read more

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Jamaican parents told to treasure children as they do cell phones

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 09 Nov 2015 – The Jamaica Teachers Association with some bold advice for parents in that country which can be taken for parents in any country; ‘Treat your children as you do your cell phones.’ In an hilarious comparison featured in the Jamaica Observer which also rings too true, Greig Smith of the Office of the Children’s Registry or OCR in Jamaica told over 100 parents at a forum that since they do not go anywhere without their cellphones, they should be just as mindful of their children and keep them close. Smith encouraged the parents to stop leaving their children at home, unsupervised and to be far more vigilant in checking the mobile devices on which their children are communicating. The forum was the first in a series arranged in Jamaica by the JTA for ‘Parents Month’ under the theme: “Parents, Take the Time… Be Involved.’ Related Items:cellphones, greg smith, Jamaica Teachers Associationlast_img read more

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Pentagon CMO Favors Thornberrys Proposal to Reform Support Agencies

first_imgJohn Gibson II, the Pentagon’s first-ever chief management officer (CMO), said that “at the high level” the Defense Department supports House Armed Services Chairman Mac Thornberry’s plan to streamline its support agencies by cutting duplicative activities and reorganizing others, according to a recent interview. “In the spirit of where the chairman’s going, I’d say we’re totally aligned,” Gibson told Defense News.Thornberry’s proposal, which is part of the defense authorization bill passed by the House Thursday, calls for the CMO to reduce or eliminate duplicative cross-enterprise functions across all defense agencies and field activities related to civilian resource, services contracting, logistics and real estate management. The legislation also directs the CMO to certify that the department has achieved at least 25 percent savings from those functions by Jan. 1, 2021. A separate section of H.R. 5515 calls for the CMO to report to Congress on any recommendations to eliminate an agency or activity, or transfer some or all of its functions to another entity, following a review of the efficiency and effectiveness of defense agencies and field activities.The initiative’s target is “aggressive” and it is not clear how much savings can be generated, Gibson said, but noted there’s a “significant opportunity” for reform. “You’re going to get the most value and the most synergies from true enterprise-wide reform. Let’s look horizontally and make sure we’re not duplicating efforts where we could consolidate those and make a center of excellence and leverage it across the enterprise,” he said.Don’t miss Gibson’s keynote address next month at the 2018 Defense Communities National Summit! He will deliver his remarks on June 19 during the Defense Communities Awards Lunch. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

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