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HMS Bulwark Returns to Plymouth, UK

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today HMS Bulwark Returns to Plymouth, UK [mappress]Naval Today Staff, December 3, 2012; Image: UK MoD December 3, 2012 Training & Education Share this article View post tag: Plymouth View post tag: Naval View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Returns View post tag: Bulwark View post tag: Navy View post tag: UK View post tag: HMS HMS Bulwark Returns to Plymouth, UK The amphibious warship HMS Bulwark returned to her home base of Plymouth last week after two months with the largest Royal Naval deployment of the year in the Mediterranean.The command and control ship led the UK’s Response Force Task Group (RFTG) on Exercise Cougar 12, consisting of the helicopter carrier HMS Illustrious, Plymouth-based HMS Montrose and HMS Northumberland, Royal Fleet Auxiliary ship Mounts Bay and the heavy-lift ferry Hartland Point.HMS Bulwark’s Commanding Officer, Captain Andrew Burns, said:“It has been an immensely successful deployment. We have proved we have the professionalism and the tools to do the job that we are here to do. We have come a long way in the two months since we sailed from Devonport, and we have honed the skills that make HMS Bulwark a capable and formidable amphibious platform and fleet flagship.“We now look forward to 2013 and the opportunities that we are presented with to develop and build upon our capabilities even further.”Sailing fully loaded with 550 sailors, Royal Marines and Commander United Kingdom Task Group staff officers, 62 Land Rovers and armoured vehicles and eight amphibious landing craft, HMS Bulwark departed as a fully loaded amphibious assault platform ready to grasp every opportunity available on the exercise to train and prove her capabilities.Having trained off the south west coast of England, where the task group took the opportunity to exercise the key elements of amphibious operations, the RFTG sailed for the Mediterranean, taking the opportunity to train with the Danish, French and Spanish navies along the way.The culmination of all the rehearsing took place in Corsica, testing the Combined Joint Expeditionary Force concept developed under the UK and France Defence Cooperation Treaty.The British and French navies were successfully able to examine and test the maritime element by demonstrating the task group’s ability to project air power from the sea using the French Carrier Strike Group and the British Amphibious Task Group, with HMS Bulwark at the centre of amphibious operations.The 13-day exercise in Albania involved Royal Marines from 30 Commando Information Exploitation Group and 45 Commando, a full land and air assault on the Vlore Peninsula, and simulated small boat attacks against the ships in the task group by the Albanian Navy, playing the role of smugglers and insurgents.Exercise Albanian Lion allowed HMS Bulwark to demonstrate her prowess in amphibious operations, command and control, and surface defence against maritime attack.The crew of HMS Bulwark also enjoyed port visits to Gibraltar, Toulon, Corfu and Malta for diplomacy duties, memorial services and sporting events. The crew are now taking some well-earned leave.last_img read more

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Focus on the Western Hemisphere: A Network Approach

first_imgThe success of this coordination and U.S. resources committed to dismantling illicit drug networks hinges on strong international partnerships forged by common goals. As a committee, we met with Panamanian President Juan Carlos Varela to address this international effort. We also engaged with Panama’s National Aero-Naval Service, or SENAN, to build on recent successes in disrupting narco-trafficking on both sides of Panama’s isthmus. Federal agencies and international partners are working tirelessly in the United States and abroad to combat Transnational Organized Crime networks. These efforts have been instrumental in eradicating production facilities and controlling the purchase of precursor chemicals used to make drugs; interrupting mobility corridors when illegal narcotics are being moved to stockpile locations; and integrating efforts to disrupt drug shipments and the distribution chain to impact the network itself. President Obama recently announced the U.S. Government’s strategy for Central America and its focus on promoting prosperity and regional economic integration, enhancing security and promoting improved governance. TIC efforts, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson’s Southern Border and Approaches Campaign plan, and our own Western Hemisphere Strategy directly support the president’s national strategy. Vice President Biden emphasized this coordination when he referenced our committee’s engagements in Puerto Rico, Panama, Colombia and Honduras during his remarks at the Inter-American Development Bank Conference. In addition to my role as Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, I am also The Interdiction Committee (TIC) chair. TIC is comprised of key representatives from a coalition of U.S. agencies dedicated to disrupting illicit networks in the drug trade, specifically through interdiction efforts in the Western Hemisphere maritime transit zone. We then traveled to Honduras, a country with the highest murder rate in the world. Most of this violence is directly associated with Transnational Organized Crime networks in the region. We met with Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez to discuss ways we can partner in combating illicit drug networks and create time and space for the seeds of governance and economic prosperity to grow. Honduras is a willing partner, and its future is important to our national security. In addition to my role as Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, I am also The Interdiction Committee (TIC) chair. TIC is comprised of key representatives from a coalition of U.S. agencies dedicated to disrupting illicit networks in the drug trade, specifically through interdiction efforts in the Western Hemisphere maritime transit zone. Federal agencies and international partners are working tirelessly in the United States and abroad to combat Transnational Organized Crime networks. These efforts have been instrumental in eradicating production facilities and controlling the purchase of precursor chemicals used to make drugs; interrupting mobility corridors when illegal narcotics are being moved to stockpile locations; and integrating efforts to disrupt drug shipments and the distribution chain to impact the network itself. We then traveled to Honduras, a country with the highest murder rate in the world. Most of this violence is directly associated with Transnational Organized Crime networks in the region. We met with Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez to discuss ways we can partner in combating illicit drug networks and create time and space for the seeds of governance and economic prosperity to grow. Honduras is a willing partner, and its future is important to our national security. Together, with a network approach, the U.S. Coast Guard is committed to hemispheric safety and security. We are committed to combating Transnational Organized Crime networks, securing our borders and safeguarding commerce. President Obama recently announced the U.S. Government’s strategy for Central America and its focus on promoting prosperity and regional economic integration, enhancing security and promoting improved governance. TIC efforts, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson’s Southern Border and Approaches Campaign plan, and our own Western Hemisphere Strategy directly support the president’s national strategy. Vice President Biden emphasized this coordination when he referenced our committee’s engagements in Puerto Rico, Panama, Colombia and Honduras during his remarks at the Inter-American Development Bank Conference. The committee worked with senior officials in Colombia, which was once included among the most dangerous countries in our hemisphere. But, through great courage and resolve, Colombia has successfully waged a hard-fought battle against illicit networks and become a prosperous nation. Colombia is also exerting regional leadership to turn illicit trafficking into an unprofitable industry. In talks with senior members of Colombia’s Navy and National Police, we heard about their experiences and success as they continue to dismantle insidious networks. The success of this coordination and U.S. resources committed to dismantling illicit drug networks hinges on strong international partnerships forged by common goals. As a committee, we met with Panamanian President Juan Carlos Varela to address this international effort. We also engaged with Panama’s National Aero-Naval Service, or SENAN, to build on recent successes in disrupting narco-trafficking on both sides of Panama’s isthmus. By Dialogo December 19, 2014 The committee worked with senior officials in Colombia, which was once included among the most dangerous countries in our hemisphere. But, through great courage and resolve, Colombia has successfully waged a hard-fought battle against illicit networks and become a prosperous nation. Colombia is also exerting regional leadership to turn illicit trafficking into an unprofitable industry. In talks with senior members of Colombia’s Navy and National Police, we heard about their experiences and success as they continue to dismantle insidious networks. Illicit networks run a staggering multi-billion dollar industry, destabilizing countries in the Western Hemisphere through violence and turmoil, undermining the rule of law and terrorizing citizens in the communities they infiltrate. Despite successes in reducing domestic cocaine use, the United States remains the number one consumer nation of illegal narcotics in the world and the consequences in our country are immediate and devastating. According to estimates by the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the total cost to the U.S. society from annual illegal drug use is nearly $200 billion. Moreover, hundreds of thousands of U.S. lives have been lost to drug overdoses and associated violence since 2001. Together, with a network approach, the U.S. Coast Guard is committed to hemispheric safety and security. We are committed to combating Transnational Organized Crime networks, securing our borders and safeguarding commerce. Illicit networks run a staggering multi-billion dollar industry, destabilizing countries in the Western Hemisphere through violence and turmoil, undermining the rule of law and terrorizing citizens in the communities they infiltrate. Despite successes in reducing domestic cocaine use, the United States remains the number one consumer nation of illegal narcotics in the world and the consequences in our country are immediate and devastating. According to estimates by the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the total cost to the U.S. society from annual illegal drug use is nearly $200 billion. Moreover, hundreds of thousands of U.S. lives have been lost to drug overdoses and associated violence since 2001. last_img read more

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Chelsea fans racially abuse Paris man

first_imgAmateur video captured footage of travelling supporters forcefully preventing a black man from boarding a train before the Blues’ 1-1 draw with Paris Saint-GermainA group of Chelsea supporters have been filmed preventing a black man from entering a Paris Metro train and subsequently chanting abuse at the individual, with the club promising action if those involved can be identified. The incident occurred on the eve of the club’s Champions League draw with Paris Saint-Germain on Tuesday evening, with Branislav Ivanovic’s goal having helped the Londoners to a 1-1 draw at Parc des Princes. Amateur film footage that has been circulated via social media appears to show a group of Chelsea supporters denying a black man entry to a subway train, physically forcing him back onto the platform. The fans then audibly chant “we’re racist, we’re racist and that’s the way we like it”, leading to a clutch of passengers exiting the train before it departs the station. A Chelsea spokesman told Goal: “Such behaviour is abhorrent and has no place in football or society.  “We will support any criminal action against those involved in such behaviour and, should evidence point to the involvement of Chelsea season ticket holders or members, the club will take the strongest possible action against them, including banning orders.” The images will come as a blow to Uefa, which has been using its ‘no to racism’ campaign as a platform to combat incidents of racism and discriminatory behaviour.last_img read more

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