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Knifepoint robber jailed for 3 months

first_img– tells Magistrate he was in a “tight squeeze”A man was on Wednesday jailed for three months by City Magistrate Fabayo Azore after he pleaded guilty to a robbery under arms charge.Kennard Persaud, 29, of Lot 25 Regent Street, Georgetown, confessed that on  August 16, at Georgetown, and while being armed with a knife, he robbed Ronald Ishmatine of one Apple iPhone valued $85,000.Confessed robber Kennard PersaudThe prosecution contended that on the day in question, the Virtual Complainant (VC) was standing in the vicinity of Footsteps Store when he was held at knifepoint and robbed by the defendant.After the robbery, Persaud attempted to escape but was apprehended by the Police after the VC raised an alarm. He was searched and the item was found on his person after which he was arrested and charged.However, the defendant admitted to the offence but explained that he was not armed when he carried out the act.He further told the Magistrate that the act was not premeditated, but was done out of frustration, since he was in a “tight squeeze” and went on to explain that he has three children to feed but could not find work after he was just released from prison.Persaud was previously sentenced to 18 months in prison on a narcotics possession charge. He pleaded for leniency, promising to stay out of trouble.last_img read more

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Syrian medical student awarded William C Campbell Bursary

first_imgA young Syrian refugee has been announced as the proud recipient of the first Professor William C Campbell Bursary.Suaad Alshleh, who is studying medicine at the Royal College of Surgeons Ireland, was today awarded a €5,000 annual scholarship by Minister for Education and Skills Joe McHugh.The award was launched this year in recognition of Donegal Nobel Prize winner Professor William C Campbell from Ramelton. Eunan FrielManaging Director of Healthcare Management; Prof Cathal Kelly RCSI; Minister for Education and Skills Joe McHugh T.D.; Suaad Alshleh and her mother Wesam Jouma and her father Issam Alshleh and Celine Marmion RCSI Prof of Chemistry and Dept Dean for Student Engagement.JULIEN BEHAL PHOTOGRAPHY.Recipient Suaad as been praised as an inspirational young woman. She and her family fled the war-torn Syria and spent more than a year in Direct Provision in Monaghan. She studied for her Leaving Cert in Mountmellick Community School Co. Laois and obtained 587 point to successfully gain a place on a Medicine degree programme.Speaking at the awards ceremony today, Suaad said her goal is to become a doctor in Ireland to give back to the people who helped her and welcomed her as a refugee.Picture shows l-r, Prof Cathal Kelly RCSI; Suaad Alshleh and Minister for Education and Skills Joe McHugh T.D.JULIEN BEHAL PHOTOGRAPHYMinister McHugh later tweeted his admiration for Suaad and said she was “a hugely impressive young woman and symbol of what is good about welcoming people to our country.”He also thanked her for sharing the message that “direct provision is not perfect but it does offer hope.” Ms Alshleh said: “The Professor William C Campbell Bursary is an incredibly generous commemoration of a brilliant scientist that gives students from disadvantaged/DEIS backgrounds the opportunity to pursue third-level education.“As the first recipient of this award, I can only dream to, one day, have as far-reaching an influence on the world as Professor Campbell has had.“And as a Syrian refugee, I‘m incredibly grateful for the Irish community as a whole for embracing me as one of their own and supporting and encouraging me, through initiatives like this, to realise my dream of studying medicine.”Minister McHugh added: “I am delighted to be able to offer the scholarship to Suaad Alshleh. She is an inspiration and I hope she enjoys her studies at such a prestigious institution as the Royal College of Surgeons Ireland. Professor Campbell’s legacy is something that we should build on and by supporting students like Suaad and others in the coming years we can do that.”   Syrian medical student awarded William C Campbell Bursary was last modified: November 6th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Professor William C Campbell Bursarylast_img read more

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Cahill confident Blues can make home advantage count

first_imgGary Cahill insisted Chelsea can feel upbeat about their chances of reaching the quarter-finals of the Champions League after their 2-1 first-leg loss to Paris St-Germain.John Mikel Obi scored a potentially vital away goal against the French Champions, who will visit Stamford Bridge for the second leg on 9 March.Cahill told BT Sport: “We are more confident at home. We know what we need to do.“We knew how tough it was to come here and get a result. The way the tie is poised, we have done it before at home.”Chelsea had to defend for much of the game in ParisWith Kurt Zouma and skipper John Terry out injured, Cahill was partnered at centre-back by Branislav Ivanovic and the pair performed well in a determined Chelsea performance.Ivanovic said: “It was a very difficult game. They scored which was massive for them, but we kept going. We know we have to do everything to win at home and go through.“We came here with courage to try and score the goals and we had a couple of chances before they scored.“We lost concentration in the end. We were a little bit open. With top strikers like PSG have, they take every single chance.“We have to be more compact and more careful, because these small details can decide a game.”More reaction from Paris to follow later.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Red Bluff High girls swimming places fourth; boys sixth

first_imgRedding >> The Red Bluff High swim teams each finished top six at the Eastern Athletic-Sac River League championships Thursday at Enterprise. The varsity girls finished fourth, the boys sixth overall. The Spartans are back in action Oct. 26 at the Northern Section Division I championships hosted by West Valley in Cottonwood. Red Bluff girls Sophomore Jayne Brandt led the way with two league titles. Brandt won the 100 freestyle in a time of 56.13, which is the 2nd fastest time ever …last_img

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Jacques Imbrailo: operatic roots

first_img17 November 2008South African opera singer Jacques Imbrailo, winner of the Standard Bank Young Artist Award for Music 2009, has established an international career at the age of 30 that most artists struggle to establish in a lifetime.Imbrailo, who lives in London with his wife Cara, grew up on a farm in South Africa’s Free State province. He attended the Drakensberg Boys’ Choir School, studied law and music under Werner Nel at Potchefstroom University, and opera under Ryland Davies at the Royal College of Music in London.In September 2006 he joined the Jette Parker Young Artists Programme of the Royal Opera House Covent Garden, making his debut as Morales in Bizet’s Carmen in December 2006.In the 2007/08 season, he played Scythian in Iphigenie en Tauride, Demetrius in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Morales in Carmen, the Flemish deputy in Don Carlos and the Wig Maker in Ariadne auf naxos. He also won the prestigious Audience Prize at the BBC’s Cardiff Singer of the World 2007 event.In the 2008/09 season he has extended his already impressive repertoire, playing Count Almaviva in Le Nozze di Figaro with conductor Emmanuelle Haim, Guglielmo in Cosi fan tutte with Opera Colorado and the Glyndebourne Touring Opera, and Schaunard in La Boheme with the Royal Opera House.Imbrailo says he will be singing in France, Wales, England and the US over the next two years.Winning the Standard Bank Young Artist Award means South Africans will get a chance to hear the internationally sought-after soloist in 2009. Winners receive a cash prize and financial support for their participation on the main programme of the National Arts Festival, Grahamstown.“My parents will be able to come and hear me sing, and it is such a lovely festival to be a part of,” Imbrailo said.“I think it is good for South African opera to have local singers with international careers,” says Imbrailo. “It inspires young singers and also attracts international directors to take an interest in South Africa.”Imbrailo says that James Bailieu, Vuyani Mlinde and Pumeza Matshikiza are some of the young South African artists he enjoys working with. “They all have a vibrant energy about what they do and phenomenal natural talent.“What sets them apart from many other young artists [in Europe] is their willingness to give blood and sweat and leave it on the piano or the stage when they finish. They give of themselves and not just what they need to, which makes seeing them work very thrilling.”Imbrailo sees his career as an opera singer as an opportunity to live out his faith. “I believe God uses me to do that where I work, and the fact that I am an opera singer is just a way to reach people.”The annual Standard bank Young Artist Awards were started in 1981 by the National Arts Festival, Grahamstown, with Standard Bank coming on board as a sponsor in 1984.The awards, seen as one of the most prestigious of their kind in the country, honour young South African artists who have not yet gained widespread national exposure or acclaim, but who are making a significant mark in their field.The awards recognize and actively promote the talent of these young artists, providing them with financial support and a platform for experimentation.Source: National Arts Festival, Grahamstownlast_img read more

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Was Microsoft’s Surface A Mistake? Of Course Not

first_imgIn a column for PCMag.com, well-known analyst Tim Bajarin argued Monday that Microsoft has “betrayed” its hardware partners with the launch of its Surface tablet, and that it should abandon its infant hardware business. It’s a strange, protectionist argument mired in the past. And it’s dead wrong.Bajarin’s argument can be summed up like this: After watching Apple and Google control the ecosystem, Microsoft decided to do the same. But by doing so, Microsoft has alienated its partners, who will be less receptive to Microsoft in the future.To that, I say, so what?Apple & Google Have Their Own HardwareBajarin’s first point is obvious, but spot on. Apple first tied together its Macintosh computer and OS with the iPod, then the iPhone and iPad, combining hardware, software (including apps), media, services and a pair of operating systems into a coherent whole. Google approached the problem from another direction, launching a comprehensive suite of services, then adding devices and later media services from Google Play. And Amazon has built out from its media business, tapping into a fork of the Android OS, and designing its own tablet.Microsoft’s been late to this game because of a few factors:It failed to immediately recognize the importance of the Internet.It relied on its hardware partners.The hardware efforts it did pursue, like the Xbox, Zune, and computer mice, were tangential to the PC.As Bajarin notes, however, the modern ecosystem or computing platform consists of hardware, software, services and media. Microsoft maintained control of the last three, but not the first.Did Microsoft need to create the Surface? No, it did not. Microsoft’s hardware partners are already bashing their brains out to create PCs with sufficient margins to keep them in business. And yes, any Surface tablets that Microsoft sells is likely a sale the partners won’t make.We already know that those partners are unhappy, and it’s very possible that Surface could become the most popular Windows tablet simply because of Microsoft’s own massive marketing effort, which simply drowns out any promotions by its hardware partners. You do have to feel somewhat sorry for those partners, whose most compelling selling point so far seems to be “We’re cheaper than the Surface!”Here’s where I think Bajarin’s argument breaks down.Co-opetition Is CommonplaceIn a recent interview with Bloomberg BusinessWeek, Apple chief executive Tim Cook was asked about the disparity between partnering with Samsung, one of Apple’s largest component suppliers, and suing Samsung’s device business for patent infringement. Cook’s response: “It’s awkward.”Sure it is. But that’s the way business is conducted today. Microsoft needs its manufacturing partners, and they need Microsoft. But that shouldn’t stop Microsoft from trying to bash their brains in. Simultaneously cooperating and competing – “co-optition” – is par for the course. Look at Twitter and its apps partners. Ditto for Apple and the developers who occasionally get in Apple’s way. An even better example is collaboratively sharing patents among various companies to develop specifications that benefit all of them, like Wi-Fi.And let’s face it – some of those partner’s products are crap. They’re full of bloatware, they’re slow, they use subpar components. Part of the blame lies within the retailer community, which encourages proprietary, low-cost builds that they can use as “doorbuster” promotions. Microsoft’s Surface is the “hero” tablet, the premium device that all other Windows tablets should aspire to. And, as we’ve argued before, that’s why Surface carries the “hero” price tag. Even if some Best Buy retailers are inexplicably burying it in the discount section.But that doesn’t mean that Asus, Acer and others are merely carrying water for Microsoft, either. Every manufacturer in the world – including component manufacturers like Super Micro – tries to differentiate themselves to capture more sales and bigger profit margins. In 1989, for example, Asus was founded as a motherboard and card manufacturer. Today, it is the world’s fifth-largest PC manufacturer. All of the world’s top five PC makers – HP, Lenovo, Dell, Acer and Asus – have expanded into the tablet market; some, like HP and Dell, failed to make their tablets into viable products.Co-opetition Runs Two WaysStill, the options are there. HP tried and failed with WebOS; Dell had less success with the free Android OS than some of its competitors. But when each manufacturer expanded into the tablet market, was there any grumbling from Microsoft about raising their Windows license prices, or cutting them off?Nope. Nothing that leaked out, anyway. Partnering with a company in one area simply does not mean that you have to share common goals in every area, or that you have to do everything in lock step. It’s a business deal, and business deals can be “awkward” and still work out to both parties’ benefit.Some companies acquire “personalities” – among them Apple, Google, and Microsoft. Personalities humanize what would otherwise be a collection of employees, products, policies and service contracts. So if a company like Apple were to go out of business, would it be missed? Unquestionably. But would Acer? I doubt it.This may sound callous, but another faceless offshore supplier would step up. And if the products had the right mix of quality and cost, we’d buy them.Similarly, if Microsoft went out of business, would Acer fall? Probably not. The company would simply pivot toward Android or some other operating system.Competition drives innovation. This is one of the fundamental principles of a free market, and one of the central tenets of organizations like the Federal Trade Commission.Say what you want about Microsoft’s Surface tablet itself; there are plenty of criticisms available to choose from, ranging from the price, to the tiny apps store, to the limitations of the Surface RT OS. But to call Microsoft’s decision to manufacture the Surface a mistake itself misses the point.  markhachman Tags:#Microsoft#Surface#tablet Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Nowcenter_img Related Posts IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more

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Lone voter from Gujarat’s Gir forest dies

first_imgOne of the country’s most famous voters, written about routinely for being the lone person to exercise his franchise at a polling booth in Banej in Gujarat’s Gir Somnath district, has died.Mahant Bharatdas Bapu died at a private hospital in Rajkot on Friday, his followers, based out of Veraval, headquarters of Gir Somnath district, said. The Banej polling booth, part of Junagadh Lok Sabha seat, used to be set up during Gujarat and general polls only for Bapu, who used to live alone at a Shiva Temple-cum-ashram in Gir West forest division there. “Bharatdas Bapu was undergoing treatment for a kidney ailment in a private hospital in Rajkot for the past one month. He died on Friday morning. His last rites will be performed on Saturday at an ashram near Jamvala in Gir Forest,” said a follower. As per government records, Bapu had voted in every Lok Sabha and Gujarat Assembly polls since 2007, in the process making Banej possibly the only booth in the country with a cent percent voting record.last_img read more

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