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Press freedom situation is “serious” in Colombia, Cuba and Haiti

first_img Follow the news on Europe – Central Asia News Help by sharing this information RSF_en News June 7, 2021 Find out more “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says to go further On the eve of the second European Union – Latin American nations Summit in Madrid, Reporters Without Borders (Reporters sans frontières, RSF) notes that state of press freedom in three Latin American countries – Colombia, Cuba and Haiti – is serious and that delicate problems have arisen recently in six others – Bolivia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Panama, Paraguay and Venezuela.Since these 33 countries committed themselves at the last such summit, on 28-29 June 1999 in Rio, to “promote and protect all human rights and fundamental freedoms”, RSF calls on European Union member-states to demand that their Latin American partners keep this promise.RSF notes that Cuba is the last country in the region that systematically imprisons journalists and asks the EU states to persuade the Cuban authorities to hold a referendum on democratising the regime and respecting freedom of expression, as called for by the opposition inside the country. This referendum, known as the Varela Project, has recently received the backing of former US President Jimmy Carter during a visit to Cuba.RSF also urges the EU heads of government to end the impunity currently enjoyed by the killers of journalists in Haiti with the complicity of the authorities there by imposing individual sanctions (denial of visas and freezing funds held abroad) on Haitian officials who are blocking the judicial process, including President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan Europe – Central Asia June 4, 2021 Find out more Delicate problems in Bolivia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Panama, Paraguay and VenezuelaIn each of these countries, except for Panama, a journalist has been killed over the past 18 months. The murder of Parmenio Medina, of Radio Monumental in Costa Rica, a country considered a model of respect for human rights, shows the media is not safe from violence anywhere in Latin America. Costa Rica’s civil society is concerned at the authorities’ silence about the progress of the enquiry into the murder. In Paraguay, the killer of Salvador Medina, who was gunned down in January 2001, was tried and convicted, but those who ordered the killing were not touched.Three of the five murders in these countries were connected with the victim’s revelations of corruption or supposed links between politicians and the underworld. In Guatemala, a dozen journalists were threatened or physically attacked for such reasons in 2001. In April this year, another journalist was forced to flee the country after investigating abuses committed by the army during the 1960-96 civil war.The situation has recently deteriorated in Venezuela. Photographer Jorge Tortoza was killed on 11 April this year while covering opposition demonstrations that led to the short-lived soup d’état against President Hugo Chávez. On 10 May, the president of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights deplored the climate of insecurity for the media, fed by inflammatory remarks about journalists made by the president and members of his government.In Panama, using laws that still provide prison terms for “defamation” and “damaging a person’s reputation,” state officials who do not like being criticised keep up a constant legal harassment of the media. Ninety suits against journalists for alleged defamation are currently on the books. On the eve of the second European Union – Latin American nations Summit in Madrid (17-18 May), Reporters Without Borders notes that state of press freedom in Colombia, Cuba and Haiti is serious and that delicate problems have arisen recently in Bolivia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Panama, Paraguay and Venezuela. It calls on the European Union to back the Varela Project in Cuba and take sanction against the haitian President. center_img News Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says 20.5.2002 – European Union hails Cuban dissidents’ referendum planThe European Union has said it approves the “Varela Project” petition recently presented to the Cuban national assembly calling for a referendum to show support for democratic reforms.It said it hoped the action of the dissidents “would be used to open a debate that will lead to a process of peaceful transition to a pluralist democracy and a reconciled Cuban society,” according to a statement issued in Madrid on 20 May. Spain currently holds the EU presidency.The EU called the Varela Project “an important step by Cuban civil society towards introducing the changes Cuba needs and that Cuban society itself wants.” News June 8, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts Serious situation in Colombia, Cuba and HaitiWith five journalists and two media assistants killed over the past 18 months, the plight of the media in Colombia remains dramatic. The main cause is the war between paramilitary groups and communist guerrillas. Things have got worse since the beginning of this year. The main offices of three media outlets have been damaged by bomb attacks, apparently by the FARC (Colombian Revolutionary Armed Forces). During the presidential election campaign, at least three journalists have been threatened and a fourth obliged to flee into exile after having investigated the past of candidate Alvaro Uribe. Five journalists in all have gone into exile abroad so far this year.In Cuba, the Constitution stipulates that the state has a monopoly of the media. Repression of members of independent press agencies the state refuses to legalise is aimed at protecting this monopoly. Cuba, the last dictatorship in the Americas, is also the only country where journalists are systematically imprisoned. Four are currently in jail there. Since the beginning of this year, about 30 arrests or acts of harassment against their colleagues have been recorded and the sale of computers to private individuals has been banned. Access to the Internet is strictly controlled. This sanitised media environment is occupied by the official press, which only puts out material approved by the Department of Revolutionary Guidance.In Haiti, all state institutions are participating in the climate of impunity. The obstacles encountered by the investigation into the April 2000 murder of journalist Jean Dominique, head of Radio Haiti Inter, are proof of this. The police are suspected of involvement in the death of two key suspects. The senate has refused to lift the parliamentary immunity of the chief suspect in the killing, Sen. Dany Toussaint. President Jean-Bertrand Aristide has stepped up reassuring statements but he has covered up for these irregularities. His followers, confident of not being punished either, have increased attacks on journalists who criticise the regime. This culminated last 3 December in the murder of another journalist, Brignol Lindor, and the departure for exile abroad of more than a dozen journalists. RecommendationsRSF calls on European Union countries to persuade their Latin American and Caribbean partner states to respect their commitment made at the previous EU-Latin American summit in Rio to “promote and protect all human rights and fundamental freedoms”.RSF especially asks the EU countries to:- Help fund the programme to protect journalists set up by the Colombian government and press Colombian officials to push ahead in the fight against impunity in the murder of journalists.- Persuade the Cuban authorities to hold a referendum on democratising the regime as requested by opposition groups inside the country. Making use of a clause in the Cuban Constitution, moderate government opponents have delivered to Parliament a petition with the 10,000 signatures required for a referendum to be held. It would be a vote on five points: freedom of expression and association, amnesty for political prisoners, recognising the right to own a business, drafting a new electoral law and, if these points are approved in the referendum, holding free elections within nine months. This opposition initiative, known as the Varela Project, received the backing of former US President Jimmy Carter during his recent visit to the island.- Take individual sanctions against Haitian officials, including President Aristide who, deliberately or by omission, is blocking investigations into the murders of Jean Dominique and Brignol Lindor. These sanctions should include refusing entry and transit visas to EU countries for these officials and their families and the freezing of funds they hold abroad. The list of 24 officials can be seen on RSF’s website (www.rsf.org).- Ask the authorities in Bolivia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Paraguay and Venezuela to investigate the murders of Juan Carlos Encinas (Bolivia), Parmenio Medina (Costa Rica), Jorge Mynor Alegría Almendáriz (Guatemala), Salvador Medina (Paraguay) and Jorge Tortoza (Venezuela), so that those who carried out the murders and those who ordered them are punished. RSF also urges that the Panamanian authorities be pressed to abolish laws providing for jail terms for media offences. Organisation Europe – Central Asia ————————————————————————————————————–16.05.2002 – Press freedom situation is “serious” in Colombia, Cuba and Haiti May 16, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Press freedom situation is “serious” in Colombia, Cuba and Haitilast_img read more

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Direct marketing still works in an electronic world

first_imgThere’s no denying that the world has dramatically shifted toward electronic communication, so many people wonder if direct marketing still works.The answer is a resounding yes, mainly because direct mail has an 80 percent-plus open rate!Google, the world’s most popular search engine, regularly uses snail mail marketing to promote coupons for its AdWords programs and other services. Credit unions are also finding that direct snail mail marketing is helping them grow their loan portfolios, including mortgages and home equity loans, as the real estate market continues to gain positive traction.While the huge demand for email marketing services continues, credit unions have seen success from direct marketing mailers, postcards and letters. Credit unions have felt a resurgence of sorts in their return on investment (ROI) when it comes to direct mail marketing.Direct mail response rates took a tremendous leap in 2016 with a 5.3 percent response rate to house lists and 2.9 percent to prospect lists. These are the highest levels the DMA has tracked since 2003. For comparison, in 2015 the rates were 3.7 percent and 1.0 percent respectively. In 2010 it was 3.4 percent and 1.4 percent.“Some people say that direct mail is dead or it doesn’t work, but we’ve seen just the opposite,” said Jackson Hunt, Vice President of Marketing at Ser Technology. “When you customize the direct marketing pieces, members feel they are part of the credit union. We have seen personalization outpace standard direct marketing pieces without any personalization. There’s plenty of research out there on the effectiveness of this.”One advantage of direct mail campaigns is that they can be far more cost-effective than mass marketing initiatives for small and midsize credit unions, allowing them to cross-sell, deepen relationships with members, loan growth and member retention. Almost any type of marketing campaign has two interrelated objectives — produce accounts and balances, and have a positive impact of underlying customer relationship. The credit unions that do manage to track campaigns focus almost exclusively on counting accounts and balances in promoted products. However, without the broader relationship component, they may be missing a material portion of the profit generated by a campaignAccording to the Direct Marketing Association, Industries with the highest use of direct mail are Financial Services — Banks or credit unions at 71 percent, Consumer Packaged Goods at 63 percent, Retail at 55 percent, Travel or Hospitality at 55 percent, and Publishing or Media at 54 percent. Furthermore, 48 percent of people prefer direct mail for receiving marketing from credit unions, and it’s not just the mid-life members who want the information sent to their actual mailbox. A study fielded by Experian shows that nearly every Millennial (ages18-35) owns a smartphone, and 43 percent say that they now access the internet more through their phone than a computer, compared with just 20 percent of adults ages 35 and older. However, despite their hyper-wired digital connectedness, Millennials as a group report that the last time they responded to direct mail campaign was within 2.4 months. That’s less than the average response time for all respondents. Similarly, Millennials open the direct mail they receive at the same high rate of 66 percent as recipients overall. To be successful, your direct marketing campaign should enable a high degree of variability to service end consumer recipients with information that is highly relevant and personalized to their needs, ultimately leading to an improved customer experience. “Direct marketing is an incredible tool that can add tremendously to the advertising plans of most Credit Unions,” Hunt explained. “Today’s world may be more digital than ever, but consumers still very much appreciate having tangible products in their hands.” 415SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Shana Richardson Shana Richardson began her career in financial technology with the Texas Credit Union League. Here, she managed the turnkey, pre-screen Auto Loan Recapture™ program, and later assumed broader responsibilities as … Web: www.sertech.com Details Co-authored by; Candice Reed a award-winning journalist, author, and PR consultant. She has written for the Credit Union Times, Credit Union Journal and many more publications.last_img read more

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Industrial Agency Team of the Year

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Breaking: Prime Minister announces date for La Liga resumption

first_imgRelatedPosts Club’s server collapses over ticket demand for first Bundesliga game in 11 years Awoniyi joins Union Berlin on loan Bale completes Tottenham return from Real Madrid Spain’s Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez has given the go-ahead for La Liga to return as soon as June 8.There has been no football played in the country’s top division since Eibar’s game against Real Sociedad on March 10, but there is now optimism it can follow the lead of the Bundesliga, with matches set to resume behind closed doors. Spain has been one of the worst-hit countries in Europe from coronavirus, but with cases now dropping, businesses are gradually re-opening, and football looks set for a comeback in the near future.While Sanchez suggested June 8 as the possible restart date, it appears more likely that June 12 or June 19 will be chosen as the dates for a return.La Liga president Javier Tebas is set to officially confirm the news in the coming days.In response to the news, a statement from La Liga read: “We are very pleased with the decision, it is the result of the great work of clubs, players, coaches, CSD, agents, etc. “But we cannot lower our guard, it is important to follow health regulations and ensure the pandemic doesn’t come back.”La Liga clubs have been back in training since earlier this month, and the Seville derby between Sevilla and Real Betis looks set to be the first game back on the calendar. Barcelona currently top the table with 58 points after 27 games, with Real Madrid just two points behind them.Each team has 11 more matches to play, meaning the season could be concluded in theory by the end of July.Earlier this week Madrid manager Zinedine Zidane said he was confident his side could overtake Barcelona if La Liga is able to return.Speaking to Real Madrid TV, he said: “We have to think positively.“The players see that there are 11 games left (in LaLiga) and they want to finish strongly in order to win a trophy. It’s in the DNA of the club. “I’m happy to be back training with my players after 60 days. We’re all happy to be back. We planned the physical preparation and they worked really well at home. They were in shape.“This week has been very good for working, albeit in small groups. But we can work on a little more tactically. The team looks better this week.”Tags: BundesligaJavier TebasLa LigaPrime Minister Pedro Sanchezlast_img read more

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