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Watch Elton John And Lady Gaga Perform ‘Don’t Let The Sun Go Down On Me’

first_imgLady Gaga has been on something of a streak lately. From singing the Star Spangled Banner at the Super Bowl, performing a David Bowie tribute at the Grammys and a scheduled performance at tonight’s Oscars, there’s just no telling what she’ll do next. Already in Los Angeles, she made her way over to an Elton John concert on the rooftop of the old Tower Records building in West Hollywood.When John was performing his big hit “Don’t Let The Sun Go Down On Me,” Gaga appeared mid-song and accompanied throughout. Watch the footage below:last_img

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Members of Kung Fu, Consider the Source, Teddy Midnight Form Phish Tribute MULTIBEAST

first_imgGet ready for the newest Phish tribute band, MULTIBEAST. Featuring the expertise of Jeff Mann on drums (Consider The Source), Chris DeAngelis on bass (Kung Fu/JAZZ is PHSH), Wiley Griffin on guitar (Teddy Midnight), and Shoheen Owhady on keys (Uncle Ebenezer), this is sure to be an exciting project that honors the musical legacy of Phish. To get things started, the group has announced a show at New York City’s American Beauty on Thursday, March 2nd, followed by a performance in Woodstock at the Bearsville Theater on Saturday, March 4th.The Tri-State’s freshest, finest & most eagerly-awaited Phish tribute project will perform the Vermont Quartet’s classic catalog with detailed mastery. Phish’s vast repertoire allows this ensemble to recreate the raw, electric energy of the band’s small venue years, while weaving powerful new spice into the sauce that catapults the classic tunes into new orbital beasts.Grateful Dead tribute act Reckoning will join forces in NYC. Tickets for American Beauty are currently on sale and can be purchased here.Tickets to Bearsville Theater can be found on the venue’s website.last_img read more

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This Is What It Means To Be A VIP At Fool’s Paradise

first_imgLoad remaining images Aside from the stellar lineup, one thing that makes Fool’s Paradise so special is the intimacy. From the small amphitheatre in St. Augustine to the one-on-one time between artists and fans, the two-day Florida vacation is more than just a musical event. From artist-led excursions to late-night shows at the Elk’s Lodge, there’s nothing quite like Fool’s Paradise.The only thing better than attending as a fan is going as a VIP. The Fool’s Paradise VIP program will have you stylin’ from the moment you check in through your first #TBT memories. The golden wristband will: provide you with priority access to the pit area in front of the stage and to the reserved searing area in front of the soundboard. Note: the rest of the venue is all General Admission, so this reserved seating is prime.On Saturday evening, there will be an exclusive happy hour with the bands. This is your chance to ask them anything, give them a cheers or high-five, and take as many photos as you’d like. This lineup is more than willing to spend time with their fans and are excited for this opportunity to become friends.Your VIP wristband will also give you discounted alcoholic beverages in a private tiki bar area. Lines are never an issue here! You will also receive an official AJ Masthay original print Fool’s Paradise poster and t-shirt.Whether you prefer to watch the show from the pit area in front of the stage or the reserved VIP seating area in front of the soundboard, you get first access to both. Add discounted alcoholic beverages, exclusive happy hour with the bands, and an official Fool’s Paradise poster and t-shirt, and you’re golden! Check out the gallery below for a taste of what it’s like to fly VIP with Fool’s Paradise. For more information, head here.One (1) 2-Day VIP Ticket ($212.50):Priority Access to Pit Area & SeatingDiscounted BeveragesExclusive Happy Hour with ArtistsFool’s Paradise Poster & T-ShirtLooking for places to stay?“Fools For Love” Hotel VIP Packages are still available, which include 2-Day VIP ticket(s) to show (for each person in package), free access to the late-night shows, priority access to pit area and seating, discounted beverages, exclusive happy hour with artists, and a very special Fool’s Paradise poster & t-shirt designed by AJ Masthay. You can purchase the Hotel “Fool For Love” VIP package here.There is also a “Fools For Trees” VIP Camping Package, which includes 2-Day VIP ticket(s) to show (for each person in package), campsite for 4 persons with parking for 2 vehicles, free access to the late-night shows, priority access to pit area and seating, discounted beverages, exclusive happy hour with artists, and a very special Fool’s Paradise poster & t-shirt designed by AJ Masthay. You can purchase the Camping “Fool For Trees” VIP package here.last_img read more

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Watch The Revivalists’ Dave Shaw & Zack Feinberg Perform A Stripped-Down Set At Paste Magazine Headquarters

first_imgThe Revivalists recently performed a career-highlighting set on the main Acura Stage at New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival last weekend. Only a few days later, they learned that their single “Wish I Knew You” hit #1 on Alternative Radio this week and set a new record for most single-week spins ever on the platform. It’s safe to say the NOLA-based septet is on the right path.Yesterday, frontman Dave Shaw and guitarist Zack Feinberg stopped by Paste Magazine‘s New York City office to deliver an acoustic, stripped-down performance of “Wish I Knew You,” along with “Hurricane Winslow” from 2010’s Vital Signs, and “It Was A Sin” from 2015’s Men Amongst Mountains, complete with song commentary.Next up for the band is a performance at The Ardmore Music Hall in Ardmore, PA (outside Philadelphia) tomorrow, May 12th, before heading to Atlanta for their set at Shaky Knees Music Festival this Saturday, May 13th. F0r a full list of upcoming dates, or to purchase tickets, head to the band’s website.last_img read more

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Nine Inch Nails’ Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross Share New Instrumental From ‘Bird Box’ [Listen]

first_imgTrent Reznor and Atticus Ross of industrial rock band Nine Inch Nails have shared their lengthy new instrumental track titled “Outside”, which is featured on the soundtrack to the new Netflix film, Bird Box. The eerie 13-minute recording perfectly captures the spirit of the buzzed-about psychological thriller right down to the core, heightening the listener’s emotional sensitivity when watching the eerie new film.Bird Box, for those who may not be up to date on the latest news in pop culture, is a new film starring Sandra Bullock where a mysterious unseen presence drives people to suicide. Pretty intense, right? So who better to call to help score such violent weirdness than Reznor and Ross, who have notably collaborated on various Hollywood film scores in recent years, including The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo in 2011 and Gone Girl in 2014.The nearly 13-minute piece begins with soft piano notes being played very ominously and softly, setting the groundwork for the possibility of more intense themes beyond the horizon. Sounds of spirits or faint voices can also be heard as the instrumental continues to build into the string sections around the 4:00-minute mark. It isn’t until halfway through at 6:25 when the intimidating low-end notes come in to really drive home the horror one would face in such a fictional predicament.The entire recording can be heard in the audio-only video below, shared by Reznor earlier this week.Nine Inch Nails – “Outside” – Bird Box Soundtrack[Video: Null Corp]“Like all soundtrack records we release, we aim for these to play like albums that take you on a journey and can exist as companion pieces to films and as their own separate works,” Reznor and Ross explain about the recording in a statement on their website. “We created a significant amount of music and conceptual sound for ‘Bird Box,’ a lot of which never made it to your ears in the final version of the film. We’ve decided to present you with this version of the soundtrack record that represents what ‘Bird Box’ is to us.”The statement also goes on to reveal that a more expansive and “self-indulgent” physical copy with an additional hour of music will arrive sometime this spring.Nine Inch Nails recently wrapped their Cold And Black And Infinite North American concert tour back in December, which saw them promote their 2018 studio album, Bad Witch.last_img read more

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Metallica To Fight Hunger Around The Country With Second Annual ‘Day Of Service’

first_imgMembers of the thrash-metal band Metallica will continue to help fighting hunger and bring more supplies into food banks around the country later this month when their second annual “Day of Service” takes place on May 22nd. The country-wide volunteering initiative is part of the band’s All Within My Hands charitable foundation, which launched in 2017.Related: Over 250 Musicians Gather In Russia To Perform Metallica’s “Sad But True”Over the last two years, All Within My Hands has raised a reported $7 million through the band and donations brought in from board members, in addition to $2 million in grant funding. Those are just the most recent numbers however, as Metallica has also spent the last two decades donating a portion of their ticket sales from every North American and European tour to benefit food banks. In addition to setting initiatives that combat hunger, All Within My Hands also provides workforce education.For the May 22nd event, the band encourages fans around the country to join them in volunteering to help those in need.“When we were talking about the mission of the foundation, it was really important to the band that fans be involved,” All Within My Hands board member Vickie Strate said about the overall goals of the band’s philanthropic arm. “We wanted people to feel like they could touch it without feeling like they needed to make a donation. That led logically to volunteerism.”Metallica – Second Annual Day of Service[Video: AllWithinMyHandsFoundation]Fans or anyone with some spare time on their hands on May 22nd can sign up to take part in this year’s event through the organization’s website, where they’ll also find a listing of participating food banks around the country. Walk-in volunteers will not be accepted. Participants can also enter the chance to win Metallica memorabilia by sharing content from their volunteering experience on social media.[H/T Billboard]last_img read more

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Nearly $37K raised for Haiti

first_imgThe vibrant, dynamic performances at the Harvard for Haiti concert on Feb. 12 made for a stark contrast with the reality of the Jan. 12 earthquake disaster in Haiti. But Harvard College students raised almost $37,000 at their sold-out benefit show at Sanders Theatre.The production was wholly underwritten by Harvard University, meaning all of the money raised will go to Partners In Health, a Harvard-affiliated nongovernmental organization that has been working in Haiti for more than 20 years.The concert, produced and performed by the students, featured performances that were varied in style but uniformly moving. Violinist Ryu Goto ’10 played with such passion that he frayed his bow.The Pan-African Dance and Music Ensemble got the audience moving and clapping along in their seats during a performance of “Drum Call.” Following a reflection by Harvard College Dean Evelynn Hammonds, the Kuumba Singers ended the evening with modern and traditional gospel songs about community and resilience.Sanders was filled to the rafters, as President Drew Faust noted in her welcoming remarks.  But the audience extended far beyond the theater, as almost 3,500 watched live via Webcast.  The online audience donated to the cause via the Harvard for Haiti Web site.After the concert, the Student Alliance for Global Health hosted a reception at the Queen’s Head Pub in Harvard Yard to help concertgoers learn more about the health implications of the disaster and what else they can do get involved. HHI, iPhone connection Michael VanRooyen, director of the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, addressed the audience … also mentioning a special iPhone app that was used in the rescue effort. Magic in motion The Caribbean Club Dance Team performs “Simplement Danse,” choreographed by Akilah Crichlow ’10. Photos by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer Classic moment The Harvard for Haiti Benefit Concert at Sanders Theatre included student performers from across campus. Ryu Goto ’11 performs Paganiniana Variations for Solo Violin. Harvard for Haiti Benefit Concertcenter_img Moore’s dance Merritt Moore ’10 performs a dance titled “A Day Without Rain” to the capacity crowd at Sanders Theatre. Piano man Charlie Albright ’11 performs two pieces during the benefit concert. Kuumba contribution The Harvard for Haiti Benefit Concert at Sanders Theatre included the Kuumba Singers of Harvard College. The University has established a relief fund for Harvard faculty and staff directly affected by the earthquake in Haiti. Donations can be made online, in person, or by mail through the Harvard Credit Union.last_img read more

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Novel artificial pancreas controls blood sugar more than 24 hours

first_imgAn artificial pancreas system that closely mimics the body’s blood sugar control mechanism was able to maintain near-normal glucose levels without causing hypoglycemia in a small group of patients.The system, combining a blood glucose monitor and insulin pump technology with software that directs administration of insulin and the blood-sugar-raising hormone glucagon, was developed at Boston University (BU).The first clinical trial of the system was conducted by Harvard researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and confirmed the feasibility of an approach utilizing doses of both hormones. In their report, appearing in Science Translational Medicine, the researchers also found unexpectedly large differences in insulin absorption rates between study participants, differences they were able to account for by adjustments to the system.“This is the first study to test an artificial pancreas using both insulin and glucagon in people with type 1 diabetes. It showed that, by delivering both hormones in response to frequent blood sugar tests, it is possible to control blood sugar levels without hypoglycemia, even after high-carbohydrate meals,” says Steven Russell, a Harvard Medical School (HMS) instructor in medicine in the MGH Diabetes Unit, who co-led the research team with Edward Damiano of the BU Department of Biomedical Engineering.In type 1 diabetes, the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas are destroyed by the immune system, requiring insulin treatment to regulate blood sugar levels. Intensive glucose control involving frequent blood sugar testing and insulin administration can delay or prevent long-term complications – such as retinal damage, kidney failure, or cardiovascular disease – but is extremely demanding and difficult to maintain. Continuous glucose monitors and insulin pumps can help, but patients remain at risk for hypoglycemia, a potentially life-threatening drop in blood sugar caused by too much insulin.Because any administration of insulin, even by an artificial pancreas system, has been associated with the risk of hypoglycemia, BU investigators Damiano and lead author Firas El-Khatib developed a system that both accounts for the rate of insulin absorption and also incorporates glucagon, a hormone naturally released by the pancreas to raise blood sugar levels. While the alpha cells of the pancreas that produce glucagon are not destroyed in people with type 1 diabetes, the cells no longer release glucagon in response to low blood sugar.“Large doses of glucagon are used as a rescue drug for people with severely low blood sugar,” explains Damiano. “Our system is designed to counteract moderate drops in blood sugar with minute doses of glucagon spread out throughout the day, just as the body does in people without diabetes.” In 2007 Damiano’s team tested the system in diabetic pigs, which led to FDA approval of the human trial.The current study enrolled 11 adults with type 1 diabetes and was primarily designed to test the software that controls the system. To get the most accurate glucose levels, the system used a monitor that directly reads blood sugar through a sensor placed into a vein instead of a continuous glucose monitor that takes readings under the skin.Participants’ blood sugar was controlled by the system for 27 hours, during which time they ate three standardized, high-carbohydrate meals and slept through the night at the hospital. While the system kept glucose levels close to the target range for six participants, five others experienced hypoglycemia significant enough that they needed a dose of orange juice to raise their blood sugar.Close analysis of participants’ blood-insulin levels revealed a nearly fourfold difference in the rate at which individuals absorbed and cleared the fast-acting insulin used in the study, with some rates of absorption being much slower than anticipated. Since the controlling software determined dosage based on the expected rate of insulin absorption, participants who absorbed at a slower rate received excessive doses, leading to hypoglycemia.A test of participants’ response to a single insulin injection verified that some had consistently slow and some consistently fast rates of insulin absorption. Rates of absorption also varied too much from experiment to experiment, even on an individual basis, to allow participant-specific dosage calculations.After globally adjusting the software parameters to a slower insulin absorption rate, the researchers conducted repeat experiments in the same participants. This time none of the slow-absorption participants experienced hypoglycemia significant enough to require intervention. Blood-sugar levels were only slightly higher in repeat experiments involving participants with fast insulin absorption, showing that the adjusted software parameters were effective for all study participants and may be adequate for everyone with type 1 diabetes.The elimination of episodes of hypoglycemia in repeat experiments involving the same participants affirmed that the initial mismatch between parameter settings and insulin absorption rate had been the cause of the hypoglycemia. All previous reported studies of artificial pancreas systems have included episodes of hypoglycemia, but this is the first study to confirm and address the cause of that hypoglycemia.Later this spring the researchers will begin a follow-up study with a system using the revised settings and driven by an FDA-approved continuous glucose monitor.  Those experiments will last more than 48 hours and include children as well as adults. The investigators also plan to compare the insulin/glucagon system with a version that uses only insulin. “The device we ultimately envision will be wearable and incorporate a glucose sensor inserted under the skin that communicates wirelessly with a pump about the size of a cell phone,” says Harvard’s Russel. “The pump would administer insulin and probably glucagon, and would contain a microchip that runs the control software.”Damiano, whose 11-year-old son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 1, adds, “a system like this would replace the need for people to constantly check their blood sugar and to make treatment decisions every few hours. It would need to be maintained but could take over the decision-making process, closely emulating a functioning pancreas. It wouldn’t be a cure, but it has the potential to be the ultimate evolution of insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes.” Damiano is an associate professor of Biomedical Engineering at Boston University.The study was supported by grants from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation, the Charlton Fund for Innovative Research in Diabetes and the National Center for Research Resources. Co-authors of the paper are David M. Nathan, MD, professor of medicine at HMS and director of the MGH Diabetes Center, and Robert Sutherlin, RN, also of the MGH Diabetes Center.last_img read more

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Recent HKS graduate Mallika Kaur awarded travel fellowship

first_imgThe Harvard Committee on General Scholarships has awarded Mallika Kaur, M.P.P. ’10 the 2010-11 Sheldon Traveling Fellowship. The competitive fellowship is awarded to one graduate from across Harvard. First nominated by Harvard Kennedy School for this award, Kaur was then selected by the Harvard-wide committee from a pool of applicants from the various graduate schools.Kaur focuses on South Asian human rights and security issues. Her perspectives have been informed by growing up in Punjab and having worked on advocacy efforts in the United States since 2001. She holds a master in public policy from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and a juris doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley. Kaur has worked with underrepresented communities in South Asia as well as in the diaspora.The Sheldon Fellowship will support her travel, study, and writing on gender issues in Indian-administered Kashmir. With heightened international involvement in Afghanistan and Pakistan, South Asian security issues are at the forefront today. Understanding how women are affected by and effect the situation in Kashmir will help deepen an understanding of this crucial region.Kaur concentrated in international and global affairs at Harvard Kennedy School and in international law at Berkley Law School. Under Rory Stewart’s leadership, she helped co-found and serves as the coordinator of the Kashmir Initiative at Harvard Carr Center. The purpose of the initiative is to create an interdisciplinary dialogue around this vital region by involving students, academics, policy makers, Kashmiris and non-Kashmiris. Multilingual and with a commitment to building bridges between disparate ethnic groups, NGOs, and state actors, Kaur continues to work toward promoting inclusive security and democracy.last_img read more

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Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies supports student research and travel in Japan

first_imgFounded in 1973, the Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies (RI) promotes research on Japan and brings together Harvard faculty, students, leading scholars from other institutions, and visitors to create one of the world’s leading communities for the study of Japan.In the weeks since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, officially named the Great East Japan Earthquake, in cooperation with the Harvard Club of Japan, the Rotary Club of Okayama, Doshisha University, the Harvard Japanese Language Program, the Office of Career Services, the Harvard Summer School office, the Office of International Education, and other entities in Japan and across campus, the Reischauer Institute has thrown wholehearted support behind the maintenance of Harvard student participation in activities and programs in Japan. For graduate students with a Japan interest, RI has provided dissertation completion grants, language study grants, and other travel and research awards. In the case of undergrads, RI has provided support for research, Japanese language study, internships, Harvard Summer School in Kyoto, volunteer relief efforts in the aftermath of the earthquake, and other activities across Japan. Now, more than ever, RI seeks to enable students to go to Japan to study, to work, to learn, and to grow as scholars and as human beings.View the full list of students supported by RI during the 2010-11 and summer 2011 academic year.last_img read more

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