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Collaboration in innovation

first_img 1Marissa Suchyta ’14 (left) and graduate student Alana Van Dervort study salamander regeneration in a lab at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. 4Graduate students Kevin Ma and Pakpong Chirarattananon perform a pre-flight lab inspection of the RoboBee (framed by an orchid) at the Harvard Microrobotics Laboratory. 19Broad Institute automation engineer Christian Soule (left) and research associate Hoang Danh perform high-throughput screening and compound management investigating cancer, infectious diseases, pesticide, and bacteria. 14Graduate student Daniel Bediako (left) and Zamyla Chan ’14 cut a silicone sample in the Nocera Lab. 16Staff engineer-mechanical Stacey Fitzgibbons (from left), and electrical staff engineers Amanda Wozniak and Crystal Knodel test a medical device developed at the Wyss Institute for treating infant apnea. On the table is a plastic infant used for calibrating the equipment. 18Senior staff scientist Daniel Levner manipulates a robot used for research while working on the organs-on-chips project at the Wyss Institute. 5Slava Arabagi works on soft sensor fabrication at the Harvard Microrobotics Laboratory. 10Ranjana Sahai, research associate in materials science and mechanical engineering, assembles robotic insect wings inside the Harvard Microrobotics Lab. 8Michael Tolley works with an origami-inspired gripper folded from a single plastic sheet in the Harvard Microrobotics Lab. 9Views of mural artwork dappled with natural light in the modern spaces of the Harvard Microrobotics Lab. 3Florian Block (from left, in reflection), a research associate in computer science, Chia Shen, a senior research fellow in computer science, and Xi Chen, a visiting scholar in computer science, use an interactive software called FloTree, which offers Harvard Museum of Natural History visitors the opportunity to use their hands as barriers to separate virtual populations of organisms. 12Zamyla Chan ’14 (from left), postdoctoral fellow in chemistry and chemical biology Christopher Gagliardi, and chemistry and chemical biology research assistant Robert Halbach work in Harvard’s Nocera Lab. Many experiments run in this lab require the rigors of oxygen and water at the level of “parts per billion,” or at even lower ratios. To perform them, students must have expertise in manipulating compounds and solutions under high-vacuum manifolds. 11Harvard Microrobotics Lab Manager Michael Smith works on a Denton sputtering chamber for disposition of thin metal onto various surfaces and materials. 13Graduate student Andrew Ullman performs research in the Nocera Lab. 2Belinda von Niederhaeusern, a former fellow in stem cell and regenerative biology, works in the Sherman Fairchild Building, which is LEED Platinum certified. Through the Harvard Green Labs Initiative, Harvard is committed to reducing energy and conserving resources in laboratories. 15Visiting graduate student Anne Louise Kodal works in the laboratory of Will Shih, associate professor of biological chemistry and molecular pharmacology at the Wyss Institute. The Shih Lab explores design principles for self-assembling molecular machines. 6Postdoctoral researcher Mike Wehner reflected in a molding of soft robot materials made in the Harvard Microrobotics Lab. 7Michael Tolley (right), postdoctoral fellow in materials science and mechanical engineering in the Wyss Institute, seen here with lab manager Michael Smith, holds a large-scale model of the Harvard Monolithic Bee — a robot insect that is actually the size of a quarter. 17Senior staff scientist Daniel Levner displays research materials and illustrations for the organs-on-chips project at the Wyss Institute. The thrill of discovery just isn’t the same when you’re alone. That’s one of the myriad reasons why collaboration is central to research at Harvard. Here, students, fellows, and researchers are common presences in Harvard’s laboratories, where they work together to make discoveries, further their studies, and co-author papers with professors. The labs are also groundbreaking environments in which robotic insects take flight and the study of energy conversion in the Nocera Lab makes inexpensive, clean energy. “Eureka!” just doesn’t have the same ring without someone else there to share the celebration. 20Cassandra Elie and Kevin Joseph, both process development associates, perform whole genome sample sequencing inside the Broad Institute.last_img read more

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Sodexo provides food for local charities

first_imgThough most Saint Mary’s students turn to dining service Sodexo for their daily physical nourishment, the company also takes time to work with students to nourish the bodies of those less fortunate in the local South Bend community. Sodexo makes a point of helping and encouraging students to reach out and support local and school-run charities, General Manager Barry Bowles said. Yet the community of Saint Mary’s students, not the company, powers much of this goodwill. “Most of the time, it’s not Sodexo that gives to charities ⎯ it’s the students,” Bowles said. “For example, the students will give away a meal swipe to help raise money for starving children in Africa.” Sodexo often has food left over that the staff would rather give to charities than throw away, he said. When students leave on holiday or when the food does not get eaten, Sodexo will transport it to local charities such as the homeless shelter in South Bend. “Students come to me all the time, asking if I can help contribute food to their charity,” Bowles said. “Dance Marathon and Belles for Africa are two charities Sodexo supports.” Sodexo contributes food to Dance Marathon, and oftentimes a large share of that food is leftover at the end of the night, Bowles said. In this case, Sodexo will pick-up the food and transport it to the homeless shelter as a donation in Dance Marathon’s name. “The students do all the work. All we are doing is dropping the food off,” Bowles said. “Does Sodexo do a lot of work? Yes, but overall the students do the majority of work.” Sodexo consistently contributes large donations to Red Cross, Hands Across America and other charities. However, Sodexo likes to support student efforts and student charities above anything else. “How can we help students?” Bowles said. “What can we do to help their charitable givings? That is what Sodexo aims to do.” Two times throughout the year, Sodexo donates a significant amount of food to the South Bend Center for the Homeless. These donations are given during fall break and winter break. “When the students leave for break, the food just sits in the coolers and the perishable items go to waste,” he said. “To prevent this from happening over long breaks, we take the food and give it to people who are actually going to use it.” The dining company may be a separate entity from the College, but Bowles said the group is considered part of the school. “We have been here for 56 years,” Bowles said. “When we do things like this, we want it to be known that Saint Mary’s is the overall contributor to the community. In essence, it’s not really Sodexo. It’s Saint Mary’s and it’s the students.”last_img read more

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Some student groups begin meeting in person

first_imgIverson Sun | The Observer The Notre Dame Cycling Club received an exemption from SAO to have in-person workouts.If the Cycling Club has more than 10 members, it cannot congregate at all once. SAO rules only permit a maximum of 10 people pods to train together at once while wearing masks.The Triathlon Club has also made adjustments to its in-person practices. First year, member Sam Vanstraten said the club has pods that rotate where they meet to train.“For practices, we have two pods that practice at different times for indoor practices,” Vanstraten said. “This has allowed us to space out when we practice on stationary bikes in the Smith Center or swimming at Rockne. When we practice outside, we are able to run in smaller groups that are spaced us as not to put ourselves at risk.”The smaller groups have allowed the team to build community, he said.“The pods have been really great for practice because it has created a smaller, more intimate community that meets often,” Vanstraten said. “I believe that the precautions that are being taken for COVID-19 have really increased the camaraderie within the club.”Many academic clubs are taking different approaches in light of the pandemic. Sophomore Hanjing Zhu, the project leader for the Microsoft Corporation at the Student Business International Council (SIBC) said her group is following a hybrid model.“While some project groups are meeting in person for their weekly meetings, I have conducted most of them on Zoom due to accessibility and safety,” Zhu said. “However, I intend to go in-person after travel-team selections conclude the following week.”While some clubs are aware of the option to meet in person, a few clubs like The Juggler, are either not sure or hesitant to continue with in-person events.“I’m actually not sure where SAO stands, which is why I’ve just been meeting on Zoom for the Juggler,” said senior William LaMarra, the head of the Juggler, the University’s literary magazine.While COVID-19 changes have made this year different, many like sophomore Jerome Gan, are cautiously optimistic.“We just had our first Asian American Association (AAA) meeting two weeks ago at Bond Quad. Everyone stayed socially distant, and these meetings seem to be working more effectively than Zoom,” Gan said. “I hope that we continue this and stay safe until the end of the semester.”Editor’s Note: An earlier version of this article stated SAO recently changed its guidelines to allow some student groups to begin meeting in person. These guidelines were only different during the University’s two-week period of remote instruction; otherwise, the SAO guidelines have not changed. The Observer regrets this error.Tags: clubs, COVID-19, fall 2020, HERE guidelines, SAO Since the start of the fall semester, Notre Dame set many new health and safety guidelines, limiting the capacities and spaces for student meetings. Following these regulations, the Students Activities Office (SAO) reworked meeting guidelines and suspended most activities that would hold significant risk for transmission of COVID-19 during the two-week pause of in-person instructions and activities.However, in light of the decrease in positive cases of the coronavirus, SAO has permitted all clubs, as it has done ever since the first day of classes, to congregate in person, given that attendance is taken at all in-person meeting and events to allow for contact tracing if necessary. Campus groups are approaching these guidelines differently.Sophomore David Campos, a member of the Notre Dame Cycling Club, said allowing members to have organized practices that follow COVID guidelines uplifted the general attitude of the club.“By training in closer proximity, we have increased the training productivity and distance that each rider could go during training rides,” Campos said. “By allowing more experienced riders to pair up with newer members while staying socially distanced, we could hone technique and fitness early before tentative races in the spring.”last_img read more

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Ease temptation

first_imgThanks to the increased focus on protecting children’s health and preventing childhood obesity, commercial jingles like “O-R-E-O” and “Hey, Kool-aid” may be as distant a memory for today’s kids as “You’ve come a long way, baby,” is for their parents.The federal government just released new dietary guidelines suggesting more fruits, vegetables, whole grains and exercise for kids. And one U.S. food company is moving to do their part to lessen poor eating habits in children.Kraft Foods announced plans to curb advertising of Oreos, regular Kool-Aid and other popular snack foods to children under 12 as part of an effort to encourage better eating habits.The company, the biggest U.S. food manufacturer, also said Wednesday it would begin labeling some healthier products with a flag touting their benefits.The new marketing program comes as food companies are facing rising criticism from some consumer groups and others that they’re contributing to obesity in children.”We’re working on ways to encourage both adults and children to eat wisely by selecting more nutritionally balanced diets,” Kraft senior vice-president Lance Friedmann said in a statement.Two years ago, Kraft moved to reduce the fat content in 200 products, cap portions for single-serve packaged snacks and quit marketing snacks at school.As part of the new marketing program, a “Sensible Solution” label will appear on products high in nutrients such as fiber or calcium or those with low fat, sugar or sodium.”I think this move may cause some people to choose these foods over other similar foods,” Crawley said. “I hope it will make them look more closely at the nutrition label, but that may be too optimistic. It mainly will influence those who are already wanting to improve their health.”Kraft said it would quit advertising products that don’t qualify for the label on cartoon shows and other shows viewed primarily by children ages 6 to 11. Among those ads to be pulled are plugs for Oreo cookies, regular Kool-Aid and some Lunchables lunch combinations.”My only concern about this announcement is that it is really hard to decide what is a ‘better food,'” Crawley said. “At least they’re considering the foods that meet the federal guidelines for low fat, low sugar and low sodium.”The rest,” she said, “will depend on their own integrity. At least it’s a step in the right direction. It’s more than most companies are doing.”Complete information on the plan is on the Kraft Web site (http://www.kraft.com/newsroom/01122005.html).last_img read more

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Landscape workshops

first_imgThe fee is $150 for both days or $100 for either day alone. That covers refreshment breaks, lunch, handouts and take-home copies of the software shown on the day or days you attend. Hort Management and Hort Scape alone normally sell for $100 each.Attendance is limited to 40 each day. The deadline to register is Oct. 18. To learn more or register online, visit www.hort.uga.edu/extension/programs/CEJBW. Or contact your county UGA Extension agent at 1-800-ASK-UGA1. For more information, phone (706) 542-2861. Bidding strategies.Estimating fixed and variable costs, including overhead and labor.Structuring bids in contract form to present to clients.Tailoring the software to fit your own business. University of GeorgiaFor landscape professionals, job bidding is tough. Bid too low and you lose money. Bid too high and you don’t get the job. Estimating costs are even more critical for beginners with no benchmark data to base their estimates on.To make the job easier and more accurate, University of Georgia horticulturists and economists have developed two software programs for estimating costs. One is for landscape installation and the other for follow-up maintenance. Get hands-on training on either or both at workshops in Athens Oct. 25-26.The workshops on both days offer everything needed to make landscape cost estimating easier and better. Day one focuses on installation and day two on maintenance. You can attend either day or both.The all-day programs begin at 8:30 a.m. each day in Room 202 of Conner Hall on the UGA Athens campus. You don’t have to know anything about computer spreadsheets. Hands-on training in a computer lab will make you comfortable using the programs.The workshops will show:last_img read more

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VNRC, Fish & Wildlife Report – A Decade of Progress: Wildlife Considerations in Local Planning

first_imgVermonters overwhelmingly want to conserve wildlife habitat such as deeryards, trout streams, and bear habitat. Cities and towns have made noticeable strides in improving attention to wildlife habitat and natural resource conservation, and nearly every municipality recognizes wildlife habitat as an important local resource, according to a recent report issued by the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department and the Vermont Natural Resources Council. The report, Wildlife Considerations in Local Planning ‘ An Evaluation of a Decade of Progress in Vermont, was based on a detailed assessment of all municipal plans and related zoning bylaws and subdivision regulations adopted by Vermont communities. About VNRCThe Vermont Natural Resources Council is an independent, member-based, nonprofit research, education, and advocacy organization founded in 1963 to protect Vermont’s environment, economy, and quality of life. The report is the result of months of detailed, technical, and comprehensive review of 248 town plans, 219 municipal zoning regulations, 204 zoning bylaws, and 137 subdivision regulations. The report compared results from a similar study performed ten years ago, and offers specific findings and recommendations.A summary of the report findings are provided below: ‘Community outreach and technical assistance for land use planning is a priority for us,’ said John Austin a wildlife biologist with the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department. ‘This report affirms the many benefits of the Department’s Community Wildlife Program and technical assistance from organizations like Regional Planning Commissions and non-profits like Vermont Natural Resources Council and others,’ Austin added.  Subdivision regulations are an increasingly important tool for conserving habitat:Of the 133 subdivision regulations reviewed, 89% include planning standards, 46% of which mention wildlife habitat.51% of municipalities in Vermont have subdivision regulations; however only 8% of these municipalities include a specific definition of wildlife habitat in these regulations. In light of these positive findings, the authors found there is a noticeable disconnect between what wildlife values Vermonters say they want to conserve and the actual implementation of those goals in zoning and subdivision regulations. The report recommends that the state and others continue to help communities bridge the gap between their planning vision and the implementation of that vision. In addition, the report suggests that municipalities need to pay more attention to specific concepts that affect  wildlife and habitat conservation, such as habitat fragmentation, habitat connectivity, invasive species, and climate change.  The information highlights the importance of wildlife and land to Vermonters and draws a connection to the myriad of interests including hunters, anglers, trappers, hikers, bird watchers, local schools, and many more. The report demonstrates that towns overwhelmingly recognize the public benefits of wildlife habitat. Over the past decade, municipalities have made many gains in mapping and recommending protection of wildlife habitat in municipal plans. The report credits the work of the Fish and Wildlife Department and technical assistance providers in increasing the availability of resources for towns. According to VNRC and the Fish and Wildlife Department, there needs to be a shift from planning to implementation over the next 10 years. ‘There is a huge need for more technical assistance as we shift towards implementation given that decisions are made at a local level by volunteers on planning commissions and development review boards,’ said Brian Shupe, Deputy Director of VNRC. Vermont relies heavily on local government for land use planning. For instance, according to an in-depth review of subdivision activity in eight towns conducted by VNRC, just five of 380 subdivision proposals were subject to Act 250 jurisdiction.center_img While most towns  recommend the conservation of wildlife habitat in their municipal plans, the report documents a significant lag between plan recommendations and actual implementation of binding standards in local bylaws. Municipalities have improved attention to wildlife conservation through land use plans:Ninety-nine percent of municipal plans identify wildlife habitat as an important resource.Ninety-nine percent of municipal plans identify some form of habitat or wildlife feature (an increase of 8% from 2000).Ninety-one percent of town plans include mapped data (up from 52% in 2000.)Eighty-seven percent of all municipal plans recommend the protection of wildlife habitat.Eighty-six percent of plans include some form of natural resource inventory data (up 11% from 2000.)Eighty-three percent of municipal plans note public benefits associated with wildlife habitat (up from 62% in 2000).Only half of municipal plans identify the effect of habitat fragmentation on wildlife habitat (42% note the importance of habitat connectivity and travel corridors)Just two percent identify the importance and/or relevance of climate change effects on wildlife habitat To read the report and its recommendations go to either the VNRC’s website (VNRC.org) or the Vermont Fish and Wildlife website (vtfishandwildlife.com). ‘Over the past several years, more and more Vermonters, through their town plans, have clearly and repeatedly said, ‘our wildlife heritage is important’ ‘ now there is a need for on-the-ground work to assure those values are reflected in specific municipal policies,’ said Jamey Fidel, VNRC’s general counsel and forest and biodiversity program director. ‘This is especially true in light of Vermont Supreme Court guidance that instructs that towns must be very specific with natural resource and wildlife habitat conservation and protection policies,’ added Fidel.  Local zoning lags behind municipal plans·   ·         A small percentage of the zoning bylaws reviewed contain conditional use standards or site plan requirements that mention wildlife habitat or specific wildlife related considerations.Of the 211 zoning bylaws reviewed, 88% include conditional use standards, but only 17% of these standards mention wildlife habitat.75% of zoning bylaws include site plan requirements, but only 18% of these standards mention wildlife habitat.51% include some form of conservation district (49% of which mention wildlife habitat).39% include explicit riparian buffers (the average buffer width was 42 feet)22% include a forest reserve district (40% of which specifically mention wildlife habitat).2% of the municipalities include a specific definition of ‘wildlife habitat’ in their zoning bylaws.1% of the municipalities (3 municipalities) include a wildlife habitat overlay district. ‘Decisions about the long-term health of the state’s wildlife habitat lie largely in the hands of local boards, commissions and private landowners, who meet in our town halls and school cafeterias,’ said Jens Hawkins-Hilke, a conservation planning biologist with the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department. ‘These very busy and committed volunteers have day jobs, families, and in many cases need additional technical assistance to implement their town’s vision for its wildlife.’   About the Vt Fish and Wildlife DepartmentThe MISSION of the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department is the conservation of fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats for the people of Vermont.  www.vtfishandwildlife.com(link is external)last_img read more

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PacifiCorp says more than half its coal plants aren’t economic anymore

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Utility Dive:The Berkshire Hathaway subsidiary used unit-by-unit analysis to calculate a net benefit or cost for taking the coal units offline by 2022, showing nearly 60% of the retirements would lead to savings. But the utility says more analysis is needed before any shutdown decisions are made.PacifiCorp’s announcement is not an official step toward early coal plant retirement, but it is part of a larger trend of economic analysis showing the difficulties of coal generation in competing with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Last week, the Carbon Tracker Initiative published a report concluding 42% of global coal plants are uneconomic due to high fuel costs, saying the percentage would rise due to carbon pricing and regulations.The Oregon Public Utilities Commission directed PacifiCorp at the end of 2017 to launch a comprehensive review of the cost of its coal resources. In September, a Washington Superior Court judge allowed the company to keep the analysis confidential, after the Sierra Club pressed for the figures to be made public.PacifiCorp’s analysis showed 13 units at plants in Montana, Colorado and Wyoming were more expensive to operate than replacement options. The company presented several scenarios of preparing a combination of coal units for 2022 retirement and found it could save as much as $317 million closing five units representing 834 MW. Those units, in Wyoming and Colorado, are slated to close between 2029 and 2037.The coal analysis is part of the utility’s 2019 integrated resource plan (IRP), which is due in April. Oregon’s regulators committed to evaluating early coal unit retirements as part of the utility’s IRP.More: PacifiCorp shows 60% of its coal units are uneconomic PacifiCorp says more than half its coal plants aren’t economic anymorelast_img read more

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Trafficking in Persons Report 2013: Belize

first_imgBy Dialogo August 08, 2013 In February 2013 the government enacted the Trafficking in Persons (Prohibition) Act which prohibits all forms of trafficking and prescribes punishments of one to eight years’ imprisonment, up to 12 years’ imprisonment if the victim is a child, and up to 25 years’ imprisonment in cases involving sexual assault or other aggravating circumstances. This law repealed and replaced the government’s previous anti-trafficking law. Notably, the new law elevated the offense of trafficking from a “summary offence” tried in the lower courts to an indictable offense tried before the Supreme Court. The prescribed maximum penalty of eight years’ imprisonment, up to 25 years’ imprisonment in some cases, is sufficiently stringent and commensurate with other serious crimes. During the reporting period, the government also passed the 2013 Commercial Sexual Exploitation Children (Prohibition) Act that criminalizes the facilitation of prostitution of children under 18 years of age. Additionally, sex trafficking and forced labor of Belizean and foreign women and girls, primarily from Central America, occurs in bars, nightclubs, and brothels throughout the country. Children and adults working in the agricultural and fishing sectors in Belize are vulnerable to forced labor. Forced labor has been identified in the service sector among the South Asian and Chinese communities in Belize, primarily in restaurants and shops with owners from the same country. In terms of prevention, the government continued to coordinate Belize’s anti-trafficking programs through an anti-trafficking committee of 13 agencies and NGOs chaired by a senior Ministry of Human Development official. During the year, the committee released a 2012-2014 anti-trafficking national strategic plan, which outlined steps to guide, monitor, and evaluate the government’s anti-trafficking efforts. The recently passed anti-trafficking law institutionalized interagency cooperation on trafficking in Belize by formalizing the role and responsibilities of the anti-trafficking coordination committee. The government continued its awareness campaign in English, Spanish, Mandarin, and Hindi. The report recommends that Belize proactively implement the recently passed anti-trafficking law by aggressively investigating and prosecuting forced labor and sex trafficking offenders, including officials complicit in trafficking; take steps to ensure the effective prohibition of the commercial sexual exploitation of children; seek criminal punishment for any guilty trafficking offender; monitor human trafficking trial procedures, and ensure trafficking offenders receive sentences that are proportionate to the gravity of the crime; complete the anti-trafficking committee’s development and implementation of formal procedures to guide officials in proactively identifying victims of sex trafficking and forced labor, including among migrant laborers and people in prostitution, and refer them for care; continue to increase partnerships with NGOs to address reintegration of trafficking victims in Belize; ensure identified foreign victims are not penalized for crimes, such as immigration violations, committed as a direct result of being subjected to human trafficking; and implement a targeted campaign educating domestic and foreign communities about forced domestic service and other types of forced labor, commercial sexual exploitation of children, and other forms of human trafficking. center_img The number of traffic convictions or sentences is not included, and it’s the most important indicator. According to the Trafficking in Persons Report published in June 2013 by the U.S. Department of State, the Government of Belize does not fully comply with the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking; however, it is making significant efforts to do so. The government enacted an anti-trafficking law late in the reporting period that raised penalties for human trafficking offenses. It also enacted a law prohibiting and punishing the commercial sexual exploitation of children under the age of 18. Belize is a source, destination, and transit country for men, women, and children subjected to sex trafficking and forced labor. A common form of human trafficking in Belize is the coerced prostitution of children, often occurring through parents pushing their children to provide sexual favors to older men in exchange for school fees, money, and gifts. Child sex tourism, involving primarily U.S. citizens, has been identified as an emerging trend in Belize. last_img read more

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Focus on the Western Hemisphere: A Network Approach

first_imgThe success of this coordination and U.S. resources committed to dismantling illicit drug networks hinges on strong international partnerships forged by common goals. As a committee, we met with Panamanian President Juan Carlos Varela to address this international effort. We also engaged with Panama’s National Aero-Naval Service, or SENAN, to build on recent successes in disrupting narco-trafficking on both sides of Panama’s isthmus. Federal agencies and international partners are working tirelessly in the United States and abroad to combat Transnational Organized Crime networks. These efforts have been instrumental in eradicating production facilities and controlling the purchase of precursor chemicals used to make drugs; interrupting mobility corridors when illegal narcotics are being moved to stockpile locations; and integrating efforts to disrupt drug shipments and the distribution chain to impact the network itself. President Obama recently announced the U.S. Government’s strategy for Central America and its focus on promoting prosperity and regional economic integration, enhancing security and promoting improved governance. TIC efforts, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson’s Southern Border and Approaches Campaign plan, and our own Western Hemisphere Strategy directly support the president’s national strategy. Vice President Biden emphasized this coordination when he referenced our committee’s engagements in Puerto Rico, Panama, Colombia and Honduras during his remarks at the Inter-American Development Bank Conference. In addition to my role as Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, I am also The Interdiction Committee (TIC) chair. TIC is comprised of key representatives from a coalition of U.S. agencies dedicated to disrupting illicit networks in the drug trade, specifically through interdiction efforts in the Western Hemisphere maritime transit zone. We then traveled to Honduras, a country with the highest murder rate in the world. Most of this violence is directly associated with Transnational Organized Crime networks in the region. We met with Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez to discuss ways we can partner in combating illicit drug networks and create time and space for the seeds of governance and economic prosperity to grow. Honduras is a willing partner, and its future is important to our national security. In addition to my role as Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, I am also The Interdiction Committee (TIC) chair. TIC is comprised of key representatives from a coalition of U.S. agencies dedicated to disrupting illicit networks in the drug trade, specifically through interdiction efforts in the Western Hemisphere maritime transit zone. Federal agencies and international partners are working tirelessly in the United States and abroad to combat Transnational Organized Crime networks. These efforts have been instrumental in eradicating production facilities and controlling the purchase of precursor chemicals used to make drugs; interrupting mobility corridors when illegal narcotics are being moved to stockpile locations; and integrating efforts to disrupt drug shipments and the distribution chain to impact the network itself. We then traveled to Honduras, a country with the highest murder rate in the world. Most of this violence is directly associated with Transnational Organized Crime networks in the region. We met with Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez to discuss ways we can partner in combating illicit drug networks and create time and space for the seeds of governance and economic prosperity to grow. Honduras is a willing partner, and its future is important to our national security. Together, with a network approach, the U.S. Coast Guard is committed to hemispheric safety and security. We are committed to combating Transnational Organized Crime networks, securing our borders and safeguarding commerce. President Obama recently announced the U.S. Government’s strategy for Central America and its focus on promoting prosperity and regional economic integration, enhancing security and promoting improved governance. TIC efforts, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson’s Southern Border and Approaches Campaign plan, and our own Western Hemisphere Strategy directly support the president’s national strategy. Vice President Biden emphasized this coordination when he referenced our committee’s engagements in Puerto Rico, Panama, Colombia and Honduras during his remarks at the Inter-American Development Bank Conference. The committee worked with senior officials in Colombia, which was once included among the most dangerous countries in our hemisphere. But, through great courage and resolve, Colombia has successfully waged a hard-fought battle against illicit networks and become a prosperous nation. Colombia is also exerting regional leadership to turn illicit trafficking into an unprofitable industry. In talks with senior members of Colombia’s Navy and National Police, we heard about their experiences and success as they continue to dismantle insidious networks. The success of this coordination and U.S. resources committed to dismantling illicit drug networks hinges on strong international partnerships forged by common goals. As a committee, we met with Panamanian President Juan Carlos Varela to address this international effort. We also engaged with Panama’s National Aero-Naval Service, or SENAN, to build on recent successes in disrupting narco-trafficking on both sides of Panama’s isthmus. By Dialogo December 19, 2014 The committee worked with senior officials in Colombia, which was once included among the most dangerous countries in our hemisphere. But, through great courage and resolve, Colombia has successfully waged a hard-fought battle against illicit networks and become a prosperous nation. Colombia is also exerting regional leadership to turn illicit trafficking into an unprofitable industry. In talks with senior members of Colombia’s Navy and National Police, we heard about their experiences and success as they continue to dismantle insidious networks. Illicit networks run a staggering multi-billion dollar industry, destabilizing countries in the Western Hemisphere through violence and turmoil, undermining the rule of law and terrorizing citizens in the communities they infiltrate. Despite successes in reducing domestic cocaine use, the United States remains the number one consumer nation of illegal narcotics in the world and the consequences in our country are immediate and devastating. According to estimates by the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the total cost to the U.S. society from annual illegal drug use is nearly $200 billion. Moreover, hundreds of thousands of U.S. lives have been lost to drug overdoses and associated violence since 2001. Together, with a network approach, the U.S. Coast Guard is committed to hemispheric safety and security. We are committed to combating Transnational Organized Crime networks, securing our borders and safeguarding commerce. Illicit networks run a staggering multi-billion dollar industry, destabilizing countries in the Western Hemisphere through violence and turmoil, undermining the rule of law and terrorizing citizens in the communities they infiltrate. Despite successes in reducing domestic cocaine use, the United States remains the number one consumer nation of illegal narcotics in the world and the consequences in our country are immediate and devastating. According to estimates by the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the total cost to the U.S. society from annual illegal drug use is nearly $200 billion. Moreover, hundreds of thousands of U.S. lives have been lost to drug overdoses and associated violence since 2001. last_img read more

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Nerd Wallet advises millennials to invest in credit unions

first_img continue reading » by: Christina PontissoMillennials aren’t seeking financial advice. Nearly 25% of those born between the years 1980-1989 said it’s because they don’t trust anyone for reputable money advice, as stated in a recent study from Fidelity investments (Huffington Post Dec. 9). Other young adults surveyed reported that they worry about their financial state on a regular basis.So where are young adults suppose to turn to? Credit Unions! Even Nerd Wallet agrees, “Because credit unions are nonprofit organizations, any money they make off of their financial products is reinvested into their institutions,” said NerdWallet’s Graham Ober in the Huffington Post blog. “This helps them provide more affordable fees on loans and mortgages. “It’s in every credit union’s best interest, therefore, to have members who are knowledgeable about their finances and who don’t, for example, default on loans.” 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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