Kashmir kidnap drama ends in quid pro quo

first_imgA day after militants abducted 11 relatives of policemen in eight hours in south Kashmir, the authorities began releasing detained relatives of militants, including the father of Hizbul Mujahideen ‘operational commander’ Riyaz Naikoo.In response, the militants freed three till Friday afternoon.Among the freed relatives of policemen were the brother of an officer of the rank of Deputy Superintendent of Police from Kulgam, a police official said. Eight persons remained in the custody of the abductors.Earlier in the day, the police quietly released over a dozen relatives of militants in Pulwama. In his late 60s, Asadullah Naikoo, father of Hizb ‘commander’ Riyaz, was among them.“Asadullah was not arrested but was detained for questioning,” said Superintendent of Police, Awantipora, Zahid Malik. At least 11 relatives of militants were detained by the security forces in the past three days in south Kashmir.An unusual pattern of detentions of family members of militants started on August 7, when the security agencies detained over a dozen relatives of three on-the-run Hizbul Mujahideen militants — Adil Ahmad Mir, Adfar Fayaz Parray and Hammad Khan — in the Tral area of Pulwama in nocturnal raids. The police described the arrested persons, mainly fathers and brothers, including a Class 11 student, as “overground workers”. In response, militants abducted the son of Rafiq Ahmad Rather, posted at the CID headquarters in Srinagar, from Tral on August 29. Asif Rather, pursuing a Master’s in Sericulture, remains captive of the militants.last_img read more

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J&K records 74% voting in nine-phase rural polls

first_imgThe ninth and final phase of panchayat elections in Jammu & Kashmir recorded a 38.8% voter turnout in the Kashmir division on Tuesday. The nine-phase polls has seen an overall 74% voting across the State.According to the Chief Electoral Officer, the frontier district of Kupwara witnessed the highest polling of 53.6%, followed by 46% in Bandipora, 38.9% in Baramulla and 38.8% in Budgam.The shadow of violence in south Kashmir this year, in which 200 militants and 100 civilians were killed, was visible in Pulwama and Anantnag districts.While south Kashmir’s Anantnag witnessed 28.4% polling, Pulwama registered just 1.4% turnout, said the officer.According to the officer, the conclusion of the final phase of the panchayat polls in J&K witnessed an overall polling of 74%, including 83.5% in Jammu division and 44.4% in Kashmir division.Kashmir has witnessed a major dip compared to the previous 2011 panchayat polls, which saw over 70% polling.The elections for 4,483 panchayat halqas, comprising 35,029 panch constituencies, were held from November 17. A total of 58,54,208 voters were registered for the polls.The first phase saw 64.5% polling in Kashmir division and 79.4% in Jammu division, and in the second phase, 80.4% in Jammu division and 52.2% in Kashmir division.Later, 55.7% in Kashmir division and 83.0% in Jammu division was recorded in the third phase; 82.4% in Jammu division and 32.3% in Kashmir division in the fourth phase; 85.2% polling in Jammu division and 33.7% in Kashmir division in the fifth phase; 17.3% in Kashmir division and 84.6% in Jammu division in the sixth phase; 84.8% in Jammu division and 30.3% in Kashmir division in the seventh phase; 85.1% in Jammu division and 49.6% in Kashmir division in the eight phase.last_img read more

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Odisha BJP leader fails to appear before police in murder case

first_imgCiting health reasons, Odisha BJP spokesperson Golak Mohapatra did not appear on Thursday at Chhatrapur police station in Ganjam district for interrogation in connection with the murder of youth BJD leader Laxmidutta Pradhan in 2017.Sub-Divisional Police Officer, Chhatrapur, Ramesh Sethi said Mr. Mohapatra sought one-month time for his appearance. “His lawyer informed us that his doctor had advised him one-month bed rest,” Mr. Sethi said.On January 29, two prominent BJP leaders of Odisha — Mr. Mohapatra and Bhrugu Buxipatra — were issued notices by the police to appear at the Chhatrapur police station in connection with the murder of the youth BJD leader. Mr. Buxipatra has been asked to appear at the police station on February 9.Laxmidutta, who also happened to be a councillor of Chhatrapur Notified Area Council, was murdered in broad daylight on September 16, 2017 by a group of armed assailants. So far, 19 persons have been arrested in connection with the murder.Two prime accused in the murder case — Krushna Chandra Nayak and Duryodhan Reddy — had been arrested from Uttarakhand. Mr. Mohapatra is suspected to have helped the two accused in fleeing to Uttarakhand and also arranged for their stay there, said police sources.Mr. Mohapatra had been earlier interrogated by the police at Chhtarpur police station on November 1, 2017. Mr. Buxipatra has been summoned by the police in connection with the case for the first time.last_img read more

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Why not simultaneous polls in J&K, asks Farooq

first_imgFormer Chief Minister and National Conference president Farooq Abdullah on Monday described the Election Commission of India’s decision to delay Assembly polls as “a major setback for democracy in J&K”.Expressing dismay over the ECI decision of not holding Assembly polls simultaneously with Lok Sabha elections, Dr. Abdullah said, “Postponement of Assembly polls can have serious ramifications across the State. The ones who took this democratically incoherent decision must be up to some mischief, otherwise there is no sound reason. If the situation is conducive for parliamentary elections, what stops them from conducting Assembly elections at the same time?”Dr. Abdullah said the whole theatrics of warmongering following the Pulwama attack was aimed to give the Prime Minister an escape route. “The forthcoming elections are, without any doubt, between the people of India and Narendra Modi. People will no more fall prey to the catchwords of Modi anymore,” he said.He hinted at finalising alliances in a few days.last_img read more

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Seven booked in Gujarat toor dal scam

first_imgSeven persons were booked, including four government officials, after State authorities ordered a probe into irregularities in the purchase of toor dal in Gujarat. More than 1,000 sacks of toor dal were found to have been filled with sand, twigs and substandard dal during the procurement process by the State Civil Supplies Department. The Opposition Congress has alleged “that officials and local BJP leaders were involved in the scam. Toor dal had been procured from farmers at the minimum support price of the State government.”last_img

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U.S. Weighs Informed Consent Rules in Wake of Infant Study Controversy

first_imgThe U.S. government is considering changing how biomedical researchers inform patients about the risks of some clinical experiments in the wake of an acrimonious debate over a study involving premature infants. The rules and the controversy—which put some neonatal research on hold for several months this year—were the subject of a daylong public hearing held earlier this week by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in Washington, D.C.The dispute has divided the bioethics community and pitted the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which funded the infant study, against the Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP), the federal watchdog for research ethics. And it has focused attention on how best to ethically conduct research that compares the effectiveness of existing medical treatments, an endeavor that has grown since Congress approved $1.1 billion for such studies under the 2010 Affordable Care Act.The controversy began in March, when the OHRP issued a letter criticizing the directors of a $20 million, 23-hospital study known as SUPPORT (the Surfactant, Positive Pressure, and Oxygenation Randomized Trial). Among other goals, SUPPORT sought to determine whether the high or low end of blood oxygen levels commonly set for premature infants was better for preventing severe disease.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The nonprofit watchdog group Public Citizen circulated OHRP’s letter to reporters, drawing widespread media attention. OHRP charged researchers with failing to provide sufficient warning to parents of the 1300 babies in the study. It said researchers should have told parents about concerns that the high-oxygen saturation group had a potentially greater risk of eye disease, while babies in the lower group might be more likely to die or suffer developmental delays. Both concerns proved true at statistically significant levels.Many researchers and NIH officials, however, challenged OHRP’s stance. In an editorial in The New England Journal of Medicine in June, NIH Director Francis Collins called OHRP’s letter “inappropriate” given SUPPORT’s excellent design and importance. Collins’s surprisingly sharp editorial suggested that the 13-year-old OHRP be reined in by having experts consider its opinions before they are issued. Other researchers noted that because the trial involved treatments that were all considered “standard of care,” it wasn’t clear whether researchers needed to inform parents about risks related to care that might have been provided even without the study.OHRP ultimately backed away from plans to sanction the researchers. Instead, it announced that it would help organize the 28 August hearing and issued a letter emphasizing that it “does not and has never questioned whether the design of the SUPPORT study was ethical.”Those at the hearing offered an array of views on both the SUPPORT study and how future studies should be conducted. Kathy Hudson, an NIH deputy director, told ScienceInsider that there was no reason for SUPPORT researchers to have mentioned the risk of death at lower oxygen levels, because there was no recent data indicating that risk. OHRP Director Jerry Menikoff, however, said the agency’s examination had found that, during preliminary discussions of SUPPORT’s design, some neonatologists had raised concerns about risks at the lower oxygen levels. OHRP concluded that these concerns met a legal standard of “reasonably foreseeable risks” that researchers are supposed to warn subjects about.The parents of one infant enrolled in SUPPORT said they should have been told. “We would never have entered our child in this study if we’d know about the risks,” Shawn Pratt, whose daughter Dagen entered the SUPPORT trial at Duke University in 2007, told the hearing panel. The child, who was born 14 weeks prematurely and weighed less than 2 pounds, now suffers from cerebral palsy, a common result of extreme premature birth. The Pratts and four other families have sued the directors of the SUPPORT trial. None know which treatment their children received during the trial.Researchers say that the controversy prompted some trials involving infants to halt work while organizers reviewed and revised materials used to acquire informed consent. Several sites in the Neonatal Research Network, based at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), stopped recruiting new patients to six other ongoing trials while they reviewed documents. Most sites have since resumed recruitment, said NICHD Director Alan Guttmacher, often with revised consent forms.The neonatology study centers, for example, hewed to OHRP suggestions regarding the SUPPORT trial in adding warnings to documents for the network’s Transfusion of Prematurity study, which compares two types of blood transfusion strategies in extreme preemies. The study’s design is similar to that of the SUPPORT trial.“The OHRP letter created a lot of scrutiny and soul searching,” said Edward F. Bell, a neonatologist at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. His group added a paragraph to its protocol explaining the study’s goals to participants, and another stating, “Because your baby was born extremely premature, he/she is at extreme risk for a number of problems including death. Any of those risks could be favorably or unfavorably affected by their placement in the trial.”At the University of Cincinnati in Ohio, neonatologists are developing two informed consent documents—one that meets the legal requirements, the other a much shorter booklet that explains the goals and potential risks of the study in plainer language, with a multiple choice test at the end to make sure trial parents have understood it.But several bioethicists and doctors are pushing HHS to undertake a more sweeping overhaul of the informed consent system. They criticize what they say is an imbalance between the relatively strict consent requirements for research studies and the weaker requirements for everyday medical activities, which may be riskier and more experimental than the procedures studied in clinical trials. It is misleading to tell patients that experiments expose them to greater risks, while allowing doctors to choose treatments without discussing the relative risks of alternatives, bioethicist Nancy Kass of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, told the panel. David Magnus, a bioethicist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, said he believed informed consent requirements could be waived when the risks of an experiment did not differ from those of standard of care treatments.But others in the bioethics community hotly attacked such proposals. SUPPORT’s system for randomly assigning infants to different treatments meant that they were not getting the “standard of care” in the institutions that treated them. While it is true that the SUPPORT infants got treatments within the range of normal care, they were put into high- or low-oxygenation groups, while doctors in neonatal care units often change oxygenation levels in response to a variety of signs and symptoms, said Michael Carome, Public Citizen’s director of health research and a former OHRP official.Others worried that the controversy will cause HHS to hesitate to protect patients. “The pressure on OHRP to pull back on enforcement sets a frightening, dangerous precedent,” said Alice Dreger, a bioethicist at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. “That is what is new here, not the essential nature of the research.”Whether the debate will ultimately lead to new rules is now up to HHS officials, who have said that they are weighing the issues.last_img read more

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ScienceShot: ‘Love Hormone’ Helps Keep Spark Alive

first_imgA whiff of oxytocin may help love not fade away. Researchers asked 20 unmarried men in multiyear relationships to rank the attractiveness of pictures of their partner, acquaintances, and strangers. When the men received a nasal spray of oxytocin—which is released by the body during sexual arousal—they rated their partners more highly but not the other women. MRI scans show that after an oxytocin dose, areas of the brain associated with rewards, which also drive drug addiction, were more active when the men saw pictures of their partner, the researchers report online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The finding could help explain the biological roots of monogamy in humans: Being in a long-term relationship raises a person’s oxytocin levels, which in turn increase the psychological reward of spending more time with that person. The cycle, the team concluded, could literally lead to an addiction to one’s lover.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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U.S. Energy Department to make researchers’ papers free

first_imgThe U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today unveiled its answer to a White House mandate to make the research papers it funds free for anyone to read: a Web portal that will link to full-text papers a year after they’re published. Once researchers are up to speed and submitting their manuscripts, that will mean 20,000 to 30,000 new free papers a year on energy research, physics, and other scientific topics.Although the plan will expand public access to papers, some onlookers aren’t happy. That’s because the papers will not reside in a central DOE database, but mostly on journal publishers’ websites. Open-access advocates say that will limit what people can do with the papers.”The DOE’s plan contains some steps in the right direction, but has some serious holes. Most critically, it doesn’t adequately address the reuse rights needed for the public to do more than simply read individual articles,” says Heather Joseph, executive director of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC). (The same gripes will likely apply to the National Science Foundation’s public access plan, which has not yet been issued but is expected to be similar to DOE’s.)Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)DOE is responding to a February 2013 memo from the White House directing federal research agencies to come up with a plan for allowing free access to taxpayer-funded, peer-reviewed manuscripts within 12 months after the paper appears in a journal. That would put agencies in line with the National Institutes of Health, which since 2008 has required its grantees to submit their accepted manuscripts to its PubMed Central archive for posting within 12 months of publication.Many publishers dislike PubMed Central—they say it infringes on journal copyright and diverts readers from their websites, cutting into advertising revenues. With those concerns in mind, in its 2013 memo the White House didn’t mandate that agencies establish a central repository but instead allowed them to devise their own plans for providing access to papers.Under the DOE plan, people will find papers through a searchable Web portal called PAGES (Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science). The portal will contain each paper’s metadata—such as the title, authors, and journal issue—and will link to the full-text PDF. That PDF will either be on the publisher’s website, or if the publisher won’t share it after 12 months, at a repository run by the researcher’s DOE lab or university. Once the publisher is ready to make it freely available, the repository link will be replaced with a link to the paper on the journal’s website.In case papers disappear when a journal folds or a link breaks, DOE will also create a “dark archive” of the full-text papers. But this is only “an insurance policy” for individual papers; the dark archive will not be accessible to the public, says Brian Hitson, acting director of the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information. Linking to the final paper on the publisher’s site ensures that people find the “best version” with any revisions or corrections, DOE says. It also responds to the memo’s requirement that the plan be “as cost-effective as possible,” Hitson says.The beta rollout of PAGES contains about 6500 papers and abstracts only for some, Hitson says. As it grows, abstracts will be added. A requirement that DOE-funded researchers submit metadata and links for their papers goes into effect on 1 October. It will take some time to “socialize” scientists to the requirement and for papers to build up, Hitson says.Many journals will provide the link through CHORUS, a coalition of commercial publishers and scientific societies (including AAAS, which publishes ScienceInsider). CHORUS is tagging papers with the funding agency so they can be tracked.Open-access advocates such as University of California, Berkeley, biologist Michael Eisen slammed CHORUS when publishers announced the program last year. They prefer a full-text government archive like PubMed Central so it is possible to “text mine,” or search across the entire body of papers. “Under this [DOE] plan, the public’s ability to download, text/data mine, and digitally analyze these articles is severely limited,” SPARC’s Joseph agrees.But Frederick Dylla, executive director and CEO of the American Institute of Physics (AIP) and a board member of CHOR Inc., which runs CHORUS, says the group is “working towards” allowing full-text and data mining. At the same time, he says there is little demand for text mining. He says AIP has never gotten a request for its more than 1 million articles; Elsevier, the publishing giant, gets only about six requests a year, he says. Text mining journal articles is “a field that’s just beginning,” he says.last_img read more

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Uncertain times await Arab World and Indian interests in 2018

first_imgTensions among key players of West Asia, efforts to consolidate his power by Saudi Crown Prince and the US move to shift its Embassy to Jerusalem could be flash points that could push the world’s most complex region into further instability in 2018 that could have global impact from energy supplies to expatriates to spread of radicalism. India could be among those impacted as most of its hydrocarbon supplies are still sourced from West Asia and it has 7-8 million expatriates in six Gulf states seending back home billions of dollars.While stability of Saudi Arabia was still being debated came US President Donald Trump’s decision to shift US embassy to Jerusalem impacting status quo of the region in a major way and pushing the region into deeper instability. This will not only see rise in anti-American protests and resentment among US allies in the Arab World but may also strengthen radical forces that could impact every continent. While stability in Riyadh is desired, it will be prudent if US reconsiders its decision on Jerusalem that will also prevent attacks on its closest ally Israel. Even Arab allies of Israel, Jordan and Egypt, may find it difficult to safeguard Israel. And Turkey, which has diplomatic ties with Israel, is already engaged in a verbal duel with Tel Aviv.  Read it at Economic Times Related Itemslast_img read more

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2017 saw UK-India ties grow but post-Brexit future concerns remain

first_imgThe UK-India ties grew steadily in 2017, with the British government laying the groundwork for a new post-Brexit economic partnership with New Delhi amid concerns over its tough stance on the movement of professionals and students between the two nations.The cultural strand of the bilateral relationship may have dominated the year, with grand celebrations at some of the UK’s major institutions to also mark 70 years of India’s independence, but the foreign office highlighted that other aspects of the ties remain equally at the forefront, especially within the context of Brexit.“Prime Minister (Narendra) Modi described the connection between our people as a ‘living bridge’ and that link has been strengthened during the 2017 UK-India Year of Culture,” said a UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) spokesperson. Read it at First Post Related Itemslast_img read more

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Hyderabad Woman Seeks Swaraj’s Help to Bring Her Daughter Back from Riyadh

first_imgA Hyderabad based woman has sought help from Indian External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj to bring her daughter back from Saudi Arabia. The woman has claimed that her daughter was allegedly trafficked to Saudi Arabia last year on the pretext of a job there.According to a report by news agency ANI, the woman, Habeeb Unissa, has sought Swaraj’s help to bring her daughter Haleem Unissa back to India from Saudi Arabia. She has been in Saudi Arabia since March 2017.While speaking to the news agency, Habeeb Unissa said that two agents promised her daughter beautician’s job in capital Riyadh. She alleged that her daughter was trafficked to Saudi Arabia on the pretext of this job. She also said that while her daughter went there last year, the family has no clue as to when she will return.Asking the government for help, Habeeb Unissa said that her daughter is being tortured.The news agency quoted the mother as saying, “My daughter, named Haleem Unissa, went there in March 2017, till now we don’t know when she will return. She was sent there to work in a beauty parlor by two agents. She is being tortured there. We have also filed a police complaint. We want to request the government to help us.”Sharing the plight of the family with the news agency, Mohammed Asif Khan, Haleem’s brother told that his sister was promised around Rs.25,000 per month in Saudi Arabia. But instead of giving her a beautician’s job, she was made to work as a housemaid there. He added that he asked the agents to bring Haleem back to India but didn’t get any response from them.He also said that his family has already requested the Indian embassy to help them in this matter. Related Itemslast_img read more

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Nanar oil refinery row simmers again

first_imgThe row over a ₹3 lakh crore oil refinery to be built in coordination with Saudi Arabia’s Aramco on Maharashtra’s coastline seems to be far from over. A pro-refinery group will organise a rally in Ratnagiri town on Saturday demanding that the project be not shifted out of its original location at Nanar in Ratnagiri district, while the anti-refinery faction has decided to hold a counter protest on the same day at the same place.An organisation called Konkan Vikas Samiti (KVS) held a press conference in Mumbai on Monday to demand that the project be not shifted out of Ratnagiri. Claiming that it would bring employment and opportunities to the local people, Avinash Mahajan of the KVS said the refinery is capable of providing employment to over 1.5 lakh people, which will lead to the development of the region as the increase in the number of employees will bring with it more facilities. “People were initially ready for the project but pressure was created to force them to oppose the project,” he said.The July 20 rally to the Collector’s office is aimed at sharing knowledge with the local people about the benefits of the refineries and to correct any misunderstanding, he said.Opponents of the project see it as a concerted attempt to push it among the local people. “There seems to be an effort from the government to bring non-political groups to the fore to push the project in Ratnagiri. There have been systematic campaigns in schools, colleges and markets from this group to promote the project,” said Satyajit Chavan, convener, Konkan Vinashkari Prakalp Virodhi Samiti. Mr. Chavan also referred to the recent meeting between Union Minister of Petroleum & Natural Gas and Minister of Steel Dharmendra Pradhan and Shiv Sena chief Uddhav Thackeray. “If the pro-refinery group is going to organise the rally, we will take to the streets to oppose them on the same day,” he said.On April 11, 2018, three Indian public sector oil companies had signed the Memorandum of Understanding with Aramco to set up the refinery at Nanar. Following protests from local residents and the ruling coalition partner Shiv Sena lending support to them, the notification issued by the State Industries Department to acquire land was cancelled and it was decided to shift the project out of Nanar. In a written reply in the Assembly in the recently-held monsoon session, Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis had said the City and Industrial Development Corporation is developing an Integrated Industrial Cluster in 40 villages in Alibaug, Murud, Roha and Shrivardhan tehsils of Raigad over 13,409.52 hectares.Newly-elected MP from Raigad Sunil Tatkare also said on Sunday he would be studying the project in the event of its coming to his district, before deciding on whether to support it or oppose it. “I will be meeting the Chief Minister and Union minister to discuss the issue. We will decide our position only after going through its pros and cons,” he said.last_img read more

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Coming this Sunday: BJP’s mega recruitment

first_imgCome Sunday and the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) is likely to witness a ‘mega recruitment’ of leaders from the Congress, Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) and other parties at a rally in Solapur, in the presence of party president Amit Shah.Among the top leaders who are likely to join the BJP include former chief minister and current Rajya Sabha MP from the BJP quota Narayan Rane. Mr. Rane will reportedly dissolve his party, the Maharashtra Swabhiman Paksha, which he formed after quitting the Congress. His two sons, Congress MLA Nitesh and former Congress MP Nilesh, are also likely to join the BJP. Former Kolhapur MP and NCP leader Dhananjay Mahadik is also likely to jump ship to the BJP. Mr. Mahadik, whose cousin is a BJP MLA, lost the 2019 Lok Sabha polls to Shiv Sena’s Sanjay Mandlik, with the Congress and sections of the NCP allegedly campaigning against him because of his proximity with the BJP. On Friday, Jaikumar Gore, Congress MLA from Man in western Maharashtra, submitted his resignation to Assembly speaker Haribhau Bagde, which was accepted. Mr. Gore is also likely to join the BJP on Sunday. His brother and bitter rival Shekhar has already joined the Shiv Sena. In 2014, the brothers contested the polls respectively from Congress and NCP. Congress MLA Siddharam Mhetre from Solapur district is also likely to switch to the BJP on Sunday.The biggest defection could be of Padmasinha Patil, a founding member of the NCP and a close aide of party president Sharad Pawar, and his son, NCP MLA Ranajagjitsinha Patil from Osmanabad district. Apart from these names, Satara MP Udayanraje Bhosle, State Council chairman Ramraje Nimbalkar and MLA Baban Shinde from the NCP, and Congress leader Harshvardhan Patil are also said to be on their way to the BJP.last_img read more

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Over 260 arrested for gambling

first_imgOver 260 people were arrested by the police during raids on illegal gambling dens in Odisha’s Ganjam district over the past 24 hours.This hints at the extent of gambling in the region from Dussehra festivities till Kumar Purnima festival on Sunday. According to police sources, since Saturday night, 14 gambling dens were raided in Berhampur police district, 95 people were arrested and over ₹4.24 lakh in cash seized. In Ganjam police district, 32 gambling dens were raided during the same period with the arrest of 166 gamblers and seizure of over ₹4.79 lakh in cash. Ganjam revenue district has two police districts.Over the past one week, the police have been raiding illegal gambling dens in Ganjam district. On October 10 night, the police busted a major illegal gambling den in Berhampur with the seizure of ₹7.68 lakh in cash and arrest of 15 gamblers. Those arrested include two former corporators of the Berhampur Municipal Corporation and a branch manager of a private bank.last_img read more

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Huge rush at Srinagar weekly market even as shutdown continues in Valley

first_imgThe weekly flea market in Srinagar saw a huge rush even as normal life elsewhere in Kashmir remained affected for the 77th consecutive day on Sunday following abrogation of Article 370 provisions, officials said. Main markets remained shut and public transport were off the roads. Private vehicles were plying unhindered in the city and elsewhere in Kashmir, while auto-rickshaws and a few inter-district cabs were seen in some areas of the Valley, they said. The weekly flea market, locally known as ‘Sunday Market’, was open as several dozen vendors had put up stalls on the TRC Chowk-Batamaloo axis through Lal Chowk city centre, the officials said. The market witnessed a huge rush of customers as thousands of people thronged it for shopping clothes and other items. However, elsewhere life remained affected. Shops opened for a few hours early in the morning in some areas, including the commercial hub of Lal Chowk, but the main markets and other business establishments were shut, officials said. Internet services – across all platforms – continued to be unavailable in the valley, the officials said. Most of the top level and second rung separatist politicians have been taken into preventive custody while mainstream leaders, including two former chief ministers — Omar Abdullah and Mehbooba Mufti, have been either detained or placed under house arrest. Another former chief minister and Lok Sabha MP from Srinagar Farooq Abdullah has been arrested under the controversial Public Safety act, a law enacted by his father and National Conference founder Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah in 1978 when he was the chief minister.last_img read more

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How can BJP-Sena form govt. amid mutual distrust: Chavan

first_imgIt was the responsibility of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) and the Shiv Sena to provide a stable government for the people of Maharashtra, senior Congressman and former Chief Minister Prithviraj Chavan said on Tuesday. In the event that the BJP-Sena power-sharing talks fail and the Sena approaches the Congress with a proposal on government formation, it would place the matter before the Congress high command and discuss it with its allies, said Mr. Chavan.“These are ifs and buts… in case we do receive such a proposal from the Shiv Sena… To the best of my knowledge, no such proposal has come to us,” said the senior Congressman, speaking to reporters in Karad in Satara.Mr. Chavan said he wondered how the saffron allies could form a government given the mutual distrust between them at the moment. “It appears that there is a major hitch in their government-formation talks. On the one hand, the Sena leadership is talking of a 50:50 power-sharing deal having been settled with [Union Home Minister] Amit Shah. Now, it seems that there is a wide gap between the Sena’s understanding and Chief Minister Fadnavis’ statements that no such secret deal was cut,” he said. “Both parties [Sena and BJP] should hold a press conference to tell the voters of the State what was decided between them in order to end this confusion.”Mr. Chavan had won a stiff three-way fight in the Karad South Assembly segment and defeated his rival, the BJP’s Atul Bhosale, despite high-decibel campaigns by Union Home Minister Amit Shah in Karad and Prime Minister Narendra Modi in Satara.The Leader of Opposition (LoP) would be elected from the NCP in the event the BJP and the Sena succeeded in forming the government, he said. For the first time in the State’s political history, he said, the Congress will not have an LoP from its own ranks.Mr. Chavan acknowledged that the Congress had fallen short in formulating a clear poll strategy and that it was dogged by leadership crises. Still, he said, people had responded to their campaigns highlighting the BJP’s government’s hollow assurances and severe shortcomings. He also said the Congress-NCP coalition had suffered in at least 25 Assembly segments owing to Prakash Ambedkar’s Vanchit Bahujan Aghadi (VBA), which queered the pitch for both the opposition parties and again benefited the BJP-Sena alliance.“We were willing to enter into an alliance with the VBA ahead of the Lok Sabha polls. Had we fought together, then not only Mr. Ambedkar, but perhaps six to seven VBA leaders would have been returned as MPs,” Mr. Chavan said. refuting the VBA’s allegations that the Congress had not allowed the party to grow.last_img read more

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Lone voter from Gujarat’s Gir forest dies

first_imgOne of the country’s most famous voters, written about routinely for being the lone person to exercise his franchise at a polling booth in Banej in Gujarat’s Gir Somnath district, has died.Mahant Bharatdas Bapu died at a private hospital in Rajkot on Friday, his followers, based out of Veraval, headquarters of Gir Somnath district, said. The Banej polling booth, part of Junagadh Lok Sabha seat, used to be set up during Gujarat and general polls only for Bapu, who used to live alone at a Shiva Temple-cum-ashram in Gir West forest division there. “Bharatdas Bapu was undergoing treatment for a kidney ailment in a private hospital in Rajkot for the past one month. He died on Friday morning. His last rites will be performed on Saturday at an ashram near Jamvala in Gir Forest,” said a follower. As per government records, Bapu had voted in every Lok Sabha and Gujarat Assembly polls since 2007, in the process making Banej possibly the only booth in the country with a cent percent voting record.last_img read more

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