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‘Anti-football’ – Gianfranco Zola and David Luiz slam Burnley tactics after Chelsea draw

first_img‘Anti-football’ – Gianfranco Zola and David Luiz slam Burnley tactics after Chelsea draw David Luiz slamed Burnley’s tactics after the draw with Chelsea (Picture: Getty)Chelsea assistant manager Gianfranco Zola and defender David Luiz slammed Burnley’s tactics after the Premier League draw at Stamford Bridge on Monday.The Blues failed to overtake Tottenham in the Premier League table after being held to a 2-2 draw by Burnley, who are now virtually safe from relegation.N’Golo Kante cancelled out Jeff Hendrick’s early opener in west London, before Gonzalo Higuain put Chelsea in front with a superb strike.Ashley Barnes levelled for Burnley, however, as Chelsea were unable to take advantage of Spurs, Arsenal and Manchester United all losing this weekend.ADVERTISEMENTMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CitySpeaking after the match, Luiz claimed Burnley’s tactics were ‘anti-football’, telling Sky Sports: ‘We tried everything to win the game.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘It’s difficult when you play against a team who have two chances and score two goals and didn’t want to play the game.‘It’s anti-football. Losing time [time wasting] all the time, especially when you have the ball. Their players went to the floor and stopped the game.‘They were playing 11 inside the box. It’s difficult to score against a team like that.’ Comment Advertisement Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterMonday 22 Apr 2019 10:45 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link509Shares Burnley virtually guaranteed their Premier League survival (Picture: Getty)Chelsea assistant Zola, speaking to the press rather than Maurizio Sarri who was sent off towards the end of the match, was also critical of Burnley’s tactics.He said: ‘We wanted to win. They didn’t want to lose.‘We are unhappy. There was too much time wasting. Five minutes injury time wasn’t enough to compensate. We couldn’t build important rhythm.‘We were hoping for something more. We are determined to fight until the end. This team are playing good football. We need to improve but we’re in a good way. We care as we showed today.‘We expected it to be a tough game. We didn’t expect so much time wasting. We expected Kevin [Friend, referee] to give more extra time. That’s why we’re very unhappy.’More: FootballBruno Fernandes responds to Man Utd bust-up rumours with Ole Gunnar SolskjaerNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira moveslast_img read more

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Three Danish pension funds enter DKK430m public-private partnership

first_imgThe five businesses said in 2012 they were setting up a “one-stop shop” to help public authorities plan, build and finance construction projects and envisaged investing up to DKK5bn together in infrastructure and real estate PPPs.PensionDanmark said the consortium was chosen by the Region of Southern Denmark municipality in what would be the first public-private hospital construction project in Denmark, and one of the biggest standalone PPP projects of any kind in the country.The three pension funds will provide the financing while MT Højgaard will be responsible for construction and operation for a 25-year period in conjunction with DEAS. Work on the new hospital, which will be connected to Vejle hospital via a 200m tunnel, is planned to start this summer. MT Højgaard said the new facility would have a total value of about DKK930m.It will have 91 beds, plus eight beds in an emergency unit, as well as a psychiatric outpatient clinic for children and young people.The project consists of eight cluster houses gathered around common areas and recreational patios. The buildings will be two storeys high with a total area of 17,000sqm and be ready for use by the end of 2016. PensionDanmark, PKA and Sampension are investing DKK430m (€57.6m) jointly in a public-private partnership (PPP) deal to build and operate a new psychiatric hospital in the city of Vejle.The project is the first to be undertaken by the consortium of the three labour market pension funds, Nordic contractor MT Højgaard and property administrator DEAS since the firms announced a partnership in December 2012.Torben Möger Pedersen, managing director at PensionDanmark, said: “We are really glad to have the opportunity to invest in this ground-breaking PPP project.“The investment will give members a good and stable return for many years and at the same time ensure patients and staff get high-quality physical conditions.”last_img read more

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Medical experts rip ‘reckless’ and ‘dangerous’ transgender mandate (US)

first_imgLifeSiteNews 29 April 2016Family First Comment: More experts willing to stand up and tell the truth and warn parents. “Identifying one’s gender as different from one’s biological sex is a disorder very much like anorexia, the doctors explain. And as with anorexics, the job of parents, doctors, and teachers is “not to uncritically approve” their disordered thinking “but to help them recognize the source of such confusion and to reaffirm and help re-align their ‘assigned’ sexual gender with their perceived identity.””The Alberta government’s new guidelines promoting transgenderism in the province’s schools have not only sparked a parental revolt, they have triggered a stinging rebuke from two medical professors at the University of Alberta, who call the them “incredibly misguided,” “reckless,” and  “dangerous” to the youth involved. The two U of A professors are Dr. Blaine Achen, MD, FRCPS, FASE, associate clinical professor in Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine, and Dr. Theodore K. Fenske, MD, FRCPC, FCCP, FACC, clinical professor of medicine, as well as staff cardiologist at the C.K. Hui Heart Centre. In a paper published on the Alberta Parents for Choice in Education website, they dissect and eviscerate the New Democratic government’s recently released “Guidelines for Best Practices: Creating Learning Environments that respect Diverse Sexual Orientations, Gender Identities and Gender Expressions” with surgical precision.…. The first premise the experts demolish is the assumption that a child’s so-called “self-identification” cannot be questioned but is the “sole measure of an individual’s sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression.” On the contrary, explain the professors, gender is a social construct based on “subjective perceptions, relationships, and adverse experiences from infancy onward,” and as such is the rightful subject of psychotherapy and family therapy when it differs from biological reality. Identifying one’s gender as different from one’s biological sex is a disorder very much like anorexia, the doctors explain. And as with anorexics, the job of parents, doctors, and teachers is “not to uncritically approve” their disordered thinking “but to help them recognize the source of such confusion and to reaffirm and help re-align their ‘assigned’ sexual gender with their perceived identity.”Following the guidelines for pre-pubescent transgender youth could also lead to death. The first step would be the injection of pre-pubescent youth with hormone blockers that “have been associated with dangerous health risks including vascular disease and cancer.” If the child, with the encouragement of the school system, follows this up in teenage years with “potentially carcinogenic” cross-gendered hormones to develop the outward appearance of the opposite sex, they ultimately could undergo “unnecessary surgical mutilation”—i.e., castration for boys and mastectomies for girls. But such irreversible treatments frequently do not achieve the desired result but lead to much higher suicide rates, and for the survivors,  the lifetime use of  “these toxic and potentially carcinogenic cross-sex hormones” to maintain their transgender appearance. Given how dangerous this “trajectory” is, the doctors argue, it is exceedingly unwise, if not illegal, for the guidelines to require the parents be kept in the dark about their children’s gender dysphoria. They cite the American Psychiatric Association’s treatment protocols in devastating detail to underline how “illogical” and counter indicated the Alberta government’s approach is. “Nowhere else in medicine, other than gender identity and sexuality, is such a reckless stance taken or practiced presently,” state the doctors.… the doctors deal with the most controversial aspect of the guidelines, the requirement that trans youth be allowed to use the school washrooms and change rooms of their choice. This, state the doctors, “places other children in vulnerable, and potentially dangerous, spaces.” “Our particular concern is for young girls who, if such a document were implemented, would be forced to share a washroom or changing facility with their male counterparts. … The feelings of a boy who thinks he’s a girl should not trump the privacy rights and the feelings of girls who don’t want to share their change room with a boy.”READ MORE: https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/medical-experts-rip-albertas-reckless-and-dangerous-transgender-mandatelast_img read more

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William “Bill” Dean Ison – of Connersville

first_imgThose surviving who will cherish Bill’s memory include his children; sons, William Brett Ison of Lawrenceburg, Billy Dean Ison of Morristown; daughters, Monica (Quiller) Baker of Fairfield, OH, and Jessica Ison of Richmond; parents, Dean and Carol Ison of Metamora; sister, Susan (Ken) Cox of Laurel; brothers, Kenny Ison of Brookville, Doug Ison of Metamora, and Jeff (Stephanie) Ison of Brookville; two grandchildren, Naomi Baker and Shea Baker, and several nieces and nephews.  He was preceded in death by his paternal grandparents, Aris and Hazel Ison; maternal grandparents, Cecil and Rosella Wilson, and two sisters-in-law, Kim Ison and Sandy Ison.  Friends may visit with the family on Tuesday, April 10, 2018 from 4 until 8 p.m. at Metamora Church of God.  Tony Stidham of Alpine Holiness Church will officiate the funeral service on Wednesday at 11 a.m. at the church and burial will follow in Cupps Chapel Cemetery. William “Bill” Dean Ison, of Connersville, was born on March 15, 1963 in Batesville, the son of Wilburn Dean and Carol Sue Wilson Ison.  He was a father to 4 children and attended Alpine Holiness Church.  William enjoyed fixing up old cars and bowling.  On Wednesday, April 4, 2018 at the age of 55, he passed away unexpectedly at his residence.  center_img Memorial donations can be directed to the family to help defray funeral costs.  To sign the online guestbook or to leave a personal condolence, please visit www.cookrosenberger.com.  The staff of Cook Rosenberger Funeral Home is honored to care for the family of William Ison.last_img read more

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Serie A: Juventus star to sit out Udinese clash

first_img Promoted ContentThe Best Cars Of All Time7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market Value6 Stunning Bridges You’ll Want To See With Your Own Eyes7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better7 Facts About Black Holes That Will Blow Your Mind5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic BombsTop 7 Best Car Manufacturers Of All Time8 Best 1980s Gadgets That Defined A Decade8 Things That Will Happen If An Asteroid Hits Earth7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better Leonardo Bonucci will miss Juve’s game against Udinese later on Thursday night having picked up a one-game suspension for his 10th yellow card this season against Lazio. The defender was booked after giving away a late penalty in the Bianconeri’s victory over Lazio yesterday and the Giudice Sportivo confirmed that he will now face a one game suspension.Advertisement Bonucci could potentially miss out on title celebrations on the pitch, as Juve could be crowned champions for a ninth consecutive time, after Inter failed to beat Fiorentina on Wednesday night. Read Also: NBA pulls out of Xinjiang projectWith Giorgio Chiellini still injured, Danielle Rugani is the favourite to partner Matthijs De Ligt at the back although Merih Demiral may feature.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… last_img read more

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UPDATE: Single-vehicle fatality crash on US 50

first_imgOriginal Story:Sunday afternoon, the Dearborn County Sheriff’s Office was dispatched to US 50 on the westbound side of the road just east of Texas Gas Road for a single-vehicle, rollover crash.Upon arrival, a 1996 Ford Ranger truck was located off of the roadway and the passenger was found deceased outside of the vehicle after being ejected.  The driver was able to free himself from the vehicle and was later transported to UC Health by Air Care.The crash is still under investigation by the Dearborn County Sheriff’s Office and the Indiana State Police.  The name of the driver and the victim are being withheld pending family notification. Dillsboro, IN—UPDATE: The driver of the vehicle was Justin Burris, 28, of Cleves, Ohio and the passenger was identified as Angileah Staat, 22, of Cleves, Ohio.last_img read more

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Mrinmoy Rajkhowa to play in World Cadet Chess

first_imgOur Sports ReporterGUWAHATI: Mrinmoy Rajkhowa of Assam will represent India in the forthcoming FIDE World Cadet Chess Championship – 2018 (Under – 08 Boys Category ) to be held at Santiago de Compostela, Spain from November 3.Mrinmoy has been selected in the Indian team as he had secured 3rd position in the National Under 7 Chess Championship 2017 and had also represented India in the FIDE Asian Cadet Chess Championship – 2018 (Under – 08 Boys Category ) held at Thailand this year.Mrinmoy is undergoing training under FIDE Instructors Nandan Buragohain and Biswajit Bharadwaj at Assam Chess Club for the last three years and is a class III student of Sudershan Public School Guwahati. Also Read: Sports Newslast_img

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Badgers ready for tourney

first_imgWisconsin men’s hockey head coach Mike Eaves has talked all season about getting to the “top of the mountain.” He and his Badger squad will attempt to do just that starting this weekend, as the Badgers play Bemidji State in the first round of the NCAA tournament in Green Bay.After a win against Minnesota last weekend for third place in the WCHA tournament, the Badgers earned the No. 1 seed for the NCAA tournament, giving them a considerable advantage over the rest of the field.The Badgers will also have the advantage of not having to play outside Wisconsin for the duration of NCAA play, as the Frozen Four will be held at the Bradley Center in Milwaukee.”That’s a big help,” junior forward Andrew Joudrey said of the atmosphere in Green Bay. “As we saw at Lambeau, the support’s awesome up there. We still have to come ready to play, but that’s definitely something we like to have on our side, having our fans behind us.”The Badgers last played in Green Bay in a game at Lambeau Field against Ohio State Feb. 11. More than 41,000 Badger faithful showed up to cheer on Wisconsin to a 4-2 victory.This time around, the game will be at the Resch Center, home to the Green Bay Gamblers and venue for several Badger players’ USHL careers. Seniors Adam Burish and A.J. Degenhardt as well as sophomores Josh Engel and Kyle Klubertanz played for the Green Bay Gamblers before coming to Wisconsin. Assistant coach Mark Osiecki also coached the Gamblers prior to his UW coaching career.Along with playing on their own turf, the Badgers also play in one of the easiest regional brackets in the tournament. Third-seeded Colorado College struggled in the second half of the season and failed to make the WCHA Final Five after losing to St. Cloud State in the first round. The two seed, Cornell, is the lowest-ranking two seed in the tournament at No. 8, and they finished their season with a loss as well in the ECACHL championship game to Harvard.Bemidji State is not even ranked. The team made it into the tournament after winning the CHA championship over top-seeded Niagara. The Badgers, however won’t take their first-round opponent lightly.”We’re not going to underestimate Bemidji,” freshman Jack Skille said. “They’re a really good team, they beat some pretty good schools in the past and I think they’re going to give us a hard time if we take them easy.”Bemidji went 4-2-0 against WCHA teams this season, although their four wins came against Minnesota-Duluth and Minnesota State, two teams sitting in the bottom half of their conference standings.The Badgers themselves boasted a 6-1-0 record against non-conference opponents this season, though they did not play any CHA teams. Whatever the opponent, the Badgers know there is only one satisfactory result.”We know that we have to do our jobs,” Joudrey said. “Whether you’re a four seed or a one seed, you have to win two games to advance.”Should the Badgers win a pair of games in Green Bay, they will advance to the Frozen Four in Milwaukee, where they will take on the winner from the East Regional in Albany, N.Y.Wisconsin has appeared in three-straight NCAA tournaments, but has failed to make it to the Frozen Four in the two previous years. Maine knocked the Badgers out of the tournament in the East Regional Final in 2004, and Michigan took care of Wisconsin in the first round last year.This year, between the high expectations and a top seed, anything less than a championship will be disappointing for the Badgers.”Anything less than that is a failure,” Joudrey said of a national title. “The most important thing is the national championship. That’s our ultimate goal, and that’s what we’ve been working for all year.”Eaves will change the practice regimen throughout the tournament, with shorter practices that involve less physical play and almost no skating drills. His goal is to have his team peaking mentally and physically in the coming week and a half.”You’re going to be fresher mentally if you’re not skating, if you get on and off the ice quicker,” Eaves said. “All those little things help.”Wisconsin seems to be hitting its stride at the right time. After a slump in the second half of the season when goaltender Brian Elliott went down with an injury, the Badgers now seem to be clicking on all facets of the game, with their penalty kill strong as ever and their normally flaccid power play working as well.”Our numbers have been very good recently,” Eaves said of his team’s play with the man advantage. “I think in the second half of the year, we’ve been up above 20 percent and, in the playoffs, we’re pushing 25 percent. We hope that continues.”Also helping them peak will be the momentum from the 4-0 victory over interstate rival Minnesota last weekend, despite not winning the WCHA championship.”I think it helped us a lot to rebound against Minnesota the way we did,” Joudrey said. “It shows how we can play as a team and how we need to play to be successful.”The Badgers will also sport their playoff beards next week for good luck. Whether they work has yet to be determined.last_img read more

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Hidden wounds: After a slew of unpublicized injuries derailed Syracuse last year, the program makes adjustments to stay healthy in 2012

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Each time the scene is the same. Doug Marrone alongside an injured Syracuse football player, a doctor nearby and the young man’s parents on speakerphone.The doctor is the bearer of bad news, his findings the cause of the room’s dejection. Time after time, Marrone sat through that phone call during the 2011 season. So often that he and the players began to question their luck.Eleven players — or more than 10 percent of the active roster — suffered concussions last season with a frequency that surprised the coaching staff, Marrone said in an extended interview. Other injuries, many of which have not been made public until now, also piled up, and 10 of the 11 starters on defense dealt with serious ailments in the latter stages of the year.“We were very banged up,” said Mikhail Marinovich, a defensive end on the 2011 team who has since graduated. “A lot of guys, including myself, weren’t even in a lot of practices and just kind of played the day before and then game day.”The injury problem was the principal hindrance during the five-game losing streak that closed out the 2011 season. A stout run defense became porous, and the offense slipped in productivity as the team went into a tailspin. It forced Marrone and his staff to alter certain elements of the team’s strength training and on-field practice habits going into 2012, with the ultimate goal being a more controlled environment that should produce a healthier season.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“What I did when the season was over is I went out and researched the amount and type of plays that we needed to be successful and all this quality control,” Marrone said. “And I just felt that we as a coaching staff should change up what we’re doing.“We hope that will help us not get as many of the types of injuries that we’ve been getting.”UNDER THE RADARLaunch interactive graphic ‘You won’t hear about it’Since age 4, Dan Vaughan was a wrestler. He spent 15 years of his life on the mat developing the keen neck strength that is both necessary within the sport and a by-product of its movements.Now a graduate student entering his fifth season at linebacker for Syracuse, his muscular development from wrestling is an advantage in the battle against concussions. Years of putting his head down on the mat and manipulating his neck to build strength and counter opponents puts him at a lower risk for a concussion.It’s a correlation that has been embraced by Marrone and his staff, and special strength drills in the weight room began last spring to improve players’ neck strength.“We do some stuff in the weight room where you go up against someone’s knee, and you’re constantly going back and forth,” offensive lineman Justin Pugh said. “We’ll be on all fours, and someone will put their knee out, and you push your head up against it in and out.”Vaughan said another exercise has one player move his head in different directions while it is held by a partner in various positions to strengthen the entire circumference of the neck.Both Vaughan and Pugh struggled to name any of the 11 players who suffered concussions a season ago. They mentioned Adam Harris, a starting fullback in 2011 who saw his career end due to multiple concussions, but backup center Ian Allport was the only other player they named.Pugh said players are not made aware of their teammates’ injuries, and trainers don’t share information when asked. Vaughan added that only severe concussions are made public to the team, and it’s very easy for a player to sit out of practice a few days and return without any explanation.“Unless a guy comes out and says it, you won’t hear about it,” Pugh said.Marrone said the early results are positive, but the full test will come once the regular season gets underway. He said Syracuse made it through spring practice without a concussion or any concussion symptoms, and the players showed improvement when their neck strength was tested prior to the start of preseason camp.“The coaches and the medical staff, we all take injuries seriously, but especially concussions,” Marrone said. “ … We all have a high awareness for it.”Pugh said the other major change for the 2012 season is the extra time spent by the coaching staff instructing players on the proper tempo of each drill. Players weren’t on the same page last year, he said, when it came to how hard each drill was supposed to be run.It’s something Marrone said he addressed with his coaching staff during the summer to make some alterations for this year’s preseason camp. The goal was to avoid the dangerous game of one-upmanship that Pugh described as essentially part intensity and part self-defense.“If we’re going (at a speed) where you’re not actually hitting somebody, we’re not going to have guys lowering their heads thinking, ‘He might come full speed, so I have to go full speed,’” Pugh said.“It’s kind of like this thing where it’s one-up, one-up, one-up until it gets to a level that’s too high.”‘It’s kind of like a battery’Week after week, Marinovich struggled to sleep the night before a game. Two to three hours at most was all he could manage, struggling to get comfortable and relax. Nerves weren’t the issue — his back was.Marinovich said he “was hurt all year” and played the entire 2011 season with three herniated discs and a bulging disc in his back.“In the hotel rooms I slept on the floor, slept on the ground,” Marinovich said. “It was a nightmare.”Marinovich was one of five former seniors on the 2011 team who discussed at length the additional injury problems — outside of concussions — that plagued the Orange defense and derailed a once-promising season. Every starter except safety Phillip Thomas, who was dismissed from the team for a violation of team rules after 10 games, played through a moderate to serious injury while the media and fans were, for the most part, unaware.Marinovich listed off the walking wounded with ease and named almost all 11 players on the defense. The injuries to Chandler Jones (knee), Keon Lyn (shoulder, hand), Jay Bromley (hand) and Ri’Shard Anderson (hand) were obvious, as their braces and casts were visible during games.But it was players like Deon Goggins (major shoulder problems), Dyshawn Davis (dislocated shoulder), Shamarko Thomas (partially torn hamstring) and Dan Vaughan (severely strained oblique muscle) who gutted out the season while shrouding their true statuses.Cory Boatman, a backup defensive tackle who rotated in with Goggins and Bromley, was forced to wear a molded brace on his right wrist during games to prevent it from bending backward and to limit the severe swelling.“I just knew that a lot of guys were banged up,” Boatman said. “We would talk in the locker room and be like, ‘Dang, I’m not feeling it this practice.’ But we would go out there and compete.”A group that allowed just 99.4 rushing yards per game through a 5-2 start sprung leaks over the final five games. Syracuse was continuously carved apart by opponents’ rushing attacks to the tune of 168.4 yards per game during that stretch, including a 37-17 loss to South Florida when it gave up 236 yards on the ground.Marinovich said his practice time was limited to the point where he sometimes only participated in the walkthrough before taking the field on game day. Other weeks he would practice sporadically, but there was rarely more than a day or two in between games.Harris said it was difficult at times for the offense to get the necessary looks it needed against a first-team defense where only a handful of starters actually practiced and others were playing at only 75 to 80 percent at best.“It’s funny because you go into those games and you think, ‘All right, well, I’ll recover by next week,’” Marinovich said. “But it’s kind of like a battery, and you just keep going lower and lower and lower until finally something gives.”Marinovich’s back finally did give when he was speared by a Cincinnati tight end 30 yards away from the ball in the second-to-last game of the season. It was the end of his Syracuse career and another casualty for the defense.‘Never crossed my mind’Naturally, the questions poured in as the losses added up. A defense that allowed only one 75-yard rusher in the first seven games of the season allowed six in the final five games.But the same players were going out there each week. It didn’t make sense. And Marrone was peppered with criticism and inquiries from the media.What is going on with the defense? Why can’t you stop the run? What are you going to do differently?“There’s plenty of times where he would like to just come out and say, ‘This player or this player or this player,’” Marinovich said. “But he’s got integrity. He’s an honest guy, and I think he’s a hell of a coach.”Marrone protected his players, opting not to stand at the podium and disclose injuries to the media when all five former players said it would have been easy to. They lauded him for it, calling him a true players’ coach.And after the season, when Marrone was again presented with an opportunity to explain exactly the type of medical hardships the 2011 Orange team faced, he declined once more.“It really never crossed my mind to get up there and start listing off injuries and ‘woe me’ and ‘woe this team,’” Marrone said.He said excuses — no matter when they are made — don’t help win football games.Instead, he created a plan to overcome the outburst of injuries that essentially crippled an entire season. Whether it works is still to be seen, but the adjustments have been made in an attempt to avoid another health meltdown.Now he just hopes that good fortune is on his team’s side.Said Marrone: “I give a lot of credit to those players. They went out there and played as hard as they could.” Comments Published on August 29, 2012 at 7:00 pm Contact Michael: mjcohe02@syr.edu | @Michael_Cohen13center_img Related Stories Multiple fronts: Ashton Broyld gives Syracuse a new offensive weapon who can attack defenses from a variety of positionsIn the clear: Marcus Sales enters the 2012 season refocused and rededicated to football following his season-long suspensionOn the bright side: In his first season at Syracuse, veteran coach Donnie Henderson aims to turn the struggling secondary aroundNo rush: Without a clear-cut starter after preseason camp, Syracuse head coach Doug Marrone will weigh his options at running back during the seasonBack on the warpath: Florida State poised to return to championship discussion behind swarming defenselast_img read more

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