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Giant Fossil Penguins Lived in Warm Waters

first_img“Giant prehistoric penguins?  In Peru?” puzzled a reporter on Science Daily.  “It sounds more like something out of Hollywood than science,” but a fossil penguin you could look eye to eye with has been found that far north.  “We tend to think of penguins as being cold-adapted species,” said one of the discoverers,” but not all species live in cold waters.  These fossils “seem to contradict some of what we think we know about the relationship between penguins and climate,” she said.    This one was surprising not only for its locale and size (1.5m standing height).  It comes from a stratum considered “tens of millions of years earlier than expected and during a period when the earth was much warmer than it is now.”  See also National Geographic and EurekAlert.Summing up: (1) the fossils are tens of millions of years out of order.  (2) One of the two species was larger than any penguin alive today – as tall as a human.  (3) It had a larger beak: “Both new species had long narrow pointed beaks — now believed to be an ancestral beak shape for all penguins.”  (3) It was found at an equatorial latitude, indicating a richer biodiversity in the past.  (4) Everyone was surprised by these findings.  Conclusion: another victory for evolutionism.    Encore:  (5)… “during a period when the earth was much warmer than it is now” (36 million years ago).  Conclusion: we must take drastic measures because humans are responsible for global warming.(Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Tablets vs. E-Readers: Why There’s Room For Both

first_imgRelated Posts Tags:#books#ebooks#ereaders#iBooks#iPad#Kindle#Kindle Fire#kindle paper white#Nook 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App john paul titlow 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…center_img E-readers are screwed.That’s the main takeaway from Wednesdays ominously worded report from IHS, anyway. The numbers are pretty dramatic: By the end of the year, sales of dedicated ebook reading devices will have dropped 36% from 2011. Come 2016, says IHS, total e-reader sale volume will be just two-thirds of what it was last year.Yikes. Is this really the death of e-readers? It makes perfect sense that e-reader sales are falling off a cliff. Tablets are eating their lunch. Not only has Apple sold 84 million iPads to date, but the companies who have dominated the e-reader market are themselves shipping tablets now. Consumers are quite naturally drawn to these multi-function, multimedia-capable gadgets that can stream movies, browse the Web, take photos, play Letterpress and do just about anything else app developers can dream up. And yes, those same devices – whose prices keep falling – let you read books too.  My iPad Is Great, But I Really Want A KindleWhen Steve Jobs first unveiled the iPad, I thought it was absurd. Never would I need to supplement my laptop and iPhone with this giant iPod Touch, I declared.Today, I use my iPad constantly. It serves as my alarm clock, morning newspaper, TV content provider, futuristic radio, bedtime magazine, digital cookbook and much else. It even helps me do my job. What an incredible gizmo. But you know what’s the very top of my wish list? Amazon’s Kindle Paper White. An e-reader of the very sort whose grave is allegedly being dug by my shiny new iPad. The thing about my iPad is that there’s too much going on there. It’s not quite as busy and distraction-prone as my laptop, but when I’m staring into the growing screen of my tablet, my brain knows about all the options it has. I can check Twitter, refresh my Gmail inbox one more time, page through Flipboard, catch up on my ever-overflowing Instapaper queue or see what videos are bubbling up on YouTube, ShowYou or Frequency. And I don’t even play games or use chat apps on my iPad. Reading comprises the vast majority of what I do on my iPad. Probably 90% of all the words that my brain processes in a given month come from that glowing, 9.7-inch Retina display. I catch up on Google Reader and Flipboard, but I also delve into longer content on Instapaper, Longform and digital magazines. The thing I can never seem to make my way to is the Kindle app, where the books are waiting. The Underrated Value Of A Single-Use DeviceThat’s why I want a Kindle. After a day of dinging notifications, multitasking and hopping from app to app, my brain could really use the respite of a device that does only one thing. Why, you might ask, don’t I just pick up a paperback book and put the gadgets away?I certainly do that from time to time, but the inescapable reality is that more and more content exists in digital space. Like analog records, I’ll always have a physical bookshelf, but most of what I consume will be digital. There’s just more new stuff there, and it’s more easily accessible. Some big name authors are now going directly through Amazon, with or without a print edition. If I get a PDF copy of a new book or want to get a sample a chapter, I need to turn to a gadget to read those things. E-readers might be on the decline, but e-books aren’t going anywhere. Perhaps I could just turn off my iPad’s Wi-Fi, launch the Kindle app and, for crying out loud, exercise a little self-control. I do that from time to time, too. And it works. But sometimes I’d like to leave the backlit, multifunction gadgets at home and not even have the option to do other stuff. I’d also like to do read an e-book on the beach without squinting to see the text or risk dropping a $600 device in the sand. So the Kindle it is. I very much have room for both devices in my life, and I doubt I’m the only one.All things considered, it makes complete sense that dedicated e-readers are selling less – and that that decline will continue as tablet prices drop. But I don’t think we should write off e-readers off quite yet. At least, I hope not. I’ve got a hell of a reading queue to catch up on.  9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnoutlast_img read more

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INDIANS ON FIELD

first_imgMEDAL WINNERSWEIGHTLIFTING Women’s (48kg): 1. Augustina Nwaokolo (NGR) 175 kg; 2. Soniya Chanu (IND) 167 kg; 3. Sandhya Rani Devi Atom (IND) 165 kgMen’s (56kg): 1. Amirul Hamizan Ibrahim (MAS) 257kg; 2. Sukhen Dey (IND) 252kg; 3. Srinivasa Rao (IND) 248kgWINNERSSQUASHMen’s singles (Rd I): Siddharth Suchde (IND) bt Michael Hopkins (JER); Harinder Pal Sandhu (IND) bt Shopon Pervez (BAN); Saurav Ghosal (IND x11) bt Ian Rukunya (UGA)BADMINTONMixed team pool (Gr D): India bt KenyaTENNISMen’s singles (Rd I): Rohan Bopanna (IND) bt Robert Buyinza (UGA) Women’s singles (Rd I): Rushmi Chakravarthi (IND) bt Pinki Monthla (LES) Mixed doubles (Rd 1): Leander Paes/Sania Mirza (IND) bt Stacey Nykita Roheman/Alberton Richelieu (LCA)TABLE TENNISWomen’s team event: India bt Sri Lanka Men’s team event: India bt VanuatuLAWN BOWLSWomen’s pairs: India bt Cook IslandsARCHERYQualifiers: Women’s individual recurve: Deepika Kumari; Dola Banerjee Men’s individual recurve: Rahul Banerjee; Jayanta TalukdarLOSERSSQUASHMen’s singles: Ryan Cuskelly (AUS x14) bt Sandeep Jangra (IND)LAWN BOWLSMen’s triples: Australia bt India Women’s pairs: Australia bt India SWIMMING Men’s 4x100m freestyle relay final: India finish 6th Women’s 200m freestyle: Surabhi Tipre; Arti Bajarang Ghorpade Men’s 50m backstroke: Balakrishnan M Badrinath; Praveen Tokas Men’s 400m freestyle: Anandrao Mandar; P Gagan Women’s 200m individual medley: Pooja AlvaARCHERYMen’s 400m freestyle: Jignas Chittiboma; CR Srither; Ritul Chaterjee Women’S individual compound: Gagandeep Kaur; Jhano Hansdah; Bheigyabati ChanuTABLE TENNISWomen’s team event: India lose to New ZealandDRAWHOCKEYWomen’s (Gr A): India 1 Scotland 1last_img read more

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Double whammy! Djokovic, Federer crash out in US Open shocker

first_imgRoger Federer and Novak Djokovic react after losing their US Open semifinals on SaturdayInstead of Novak Djokovic vs Roger Federer for the U.S. Open title, first-time Grand Slam finalists Kei Nishikori and Marin Cilic will vie for the championship after a pair of semifinal surprises Saturday.First, Japan’s Nishikori became the first man from Asia to reach a major singles championship match by staying fresher than Djokovic in stifling heat and winning 6-4, 1-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3.Then, Croatia’s Cilic used every bit of his 6-foot-6 (1.98-meter) frame to deliver stinging serves and flat groundstrokes during a quick-as-can-be 6-3, 6-4, 6-4 victory over Federer.”It’s fairly simple, I think: Marin played great and I maybe didn’t catch my best day,” Federer said after his 1-hour, 45-minute loss. “That’s pretty much it in a nutshell.”So much for No. 1-seeded Djokovic facing the No. 2-seeded Federer in a matchup between men who have combined to win 24 Grand Slam trophies. In what some will see as signaling a generational shift in tennis, Monday’s final will be No. 10 Nishikori against No. 14 Cilic.Croatia’s Marin Cilic defeated Roger Federer 6-3, 6-4, 6-4 in the US Open semifinal”That’s going to be a sensational day for both of us,” said Cilic, who at 25 is a year older than Nishikori.For the first time in nearly a decade – since Marat Safin beat Lleyton Hewitt at the Australian Open in January 2005 – a major final will be contested without at least one of Federer, Djokovic or Rafael Nadal, who didn’t attempt to defend his 2013 U.S. Open title because of a right wrist injury.advertisementThat trio won 34 of the past 38 Grand Slam trophies, including two months ago at Wimbledon, when Djokovic edged Federer in a five-set final.”It’s exciting for the game to have different faces from time to time,” the 33-year-old Federer said. “It’s definitely refreshing to some extent. It’s big for Croatia; it’s big for Japan.”Cilic, forced to sit out last year’s U.S. Open during a doping suspension, is the first man from Croatia to get this far at a major since his coach, Goran Ivanisevic, won Wimbledon in 2001.That’s nothing compared to Japan’s wait.Japan’s Kei Nishikori became the first Asian to reach a major singles championship finalAs it is, Nishikori was the first man from his country to reach a Grand Slam semifinal since 1933.”Very happy to make history,” said Nishikori, who moved to Florida at age 14.He weaved his way through a pair of five-setters totaling more than 8 1/2 hours while No. 3 Stan Wawrinka and No. 5 Milos Raonic, yet appeared much more lively as the temperature neared 100 degrees (37 Celsius) than Djokovic, a guy widely considered as fit as they come.”Just wasn’t myself,” Djokovic said.Especially in the pivotal third-set tiebreaker. He missed a pair of backhands. He double-faulted. He missed a forehand, and another to end the set, then smacked a ball in anger. Up in the stands, Nishikori’s coach, 1989 French Open champion Michael Chang, rose to his feet and pumped his fists.Making Nishikori’s performance all the more impressive is that as recently as a few weeks ago, he was swinging a racket while seated in practice, unable to run because he had a cyst removed from the bottom of his right foot in August.”I didn’t even know if I should come to New York,” he said, “so I wasn’t expecting nothing, actually.”Chang refused to let Nishikori think that way.”He might not have prepared the best way he knows how. But just because you haven’t done that doesn’t mean that you don’t give yourself the opportunity to come out and play,” Chang said. “That’s why I told him, ‘You get past the first round, the second round, anything can happen.'”This unforeseeable U.S. Open final shows that’s true.In the quarterfinals Thursday night, Federer dropped the first two sets against Gael Monfils and faced two match points, but escaped.There would be no such comeback against Cilic, who worked to improve his game while sidelined after testing positive for a stimulant in May 2013. He said he ingested the substance accidentally via a glucose tablet; the International Tennis Federation sought a two-year ban but it eventually was reduced to four months.Cilic had only played one previous major semifinal, at the 2010 Australian Open, while this was Federer’s 36th. And Cilic came into the day with an 0-5 head-to-head record.But this one went the other way. Wasn’t even close.Cilic hit serves at up to 132 mph (213 kph) and finished with 13 aces, including three in the final game. That he would serve effectively was no surprise. What truly stood out, though, was the way Cilic managed to hang with Federer in exchanges from the baseline.advertisement”He played,” Federer said, “with no fear.”last_img read more

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XMen Dark Phoenix director shares whats behind the MCU Easter egg

first_img 1 Summer movie preview: Aladdin, Spider-Man, Tarantino and more Comment 51 Photos It’s not often you get another crack at adapting a classic Marvel comic book story for the silver screen, but X-Men: Dark Phoenix director Simon Kinberg is doing just that.The 12th movie in 20th Century Fox’s X-Men series, in theaters globally now, shines the spotlight on psychic mutant hero Jean Grey as her powers are cosmically supercharged to the point she endangers the planet.If this sounds familiar, it’s because it was one of the plot lines in 2006’s X-Men: The Last Stand, which Kinberg co-wrote with Zak Penn. That didn’t quite do the Dark Phoenix Saga arc justice, lifelong comic reader Kinberg acknowledged when I met him in a London hotel ahead of the new movie’s release. His own fandom shone through in the way his eyes lit up as we talked. He seemed more than happy to geek out over his pop culture influences.Since The Last Stand, Kinberg’s worked as a writer and producer on First Class, Days of Future Past, Apocalypse, Deadpool, its sequel and Logan, but Dark Phoenix was his first time in the director’s chair. Despite this, I got the sense he was quietly confident he’d gotten the Dark Phoenix saga right. We even talked about the movie’s subtle nod to the Marvel Cinematic Universe (directly under the spoiler warning below), which the X-Men movies aren’t a part of due to rights issues (these were resolved when Disney acquired Fox). Here’s a transcript of our chat, lightly edited for clarity.Jean Grey dances with the darkness in this X-Men adventure. 20th Century Fox Q: Congratulations on your directorial debut. How do you feel?Kinberg: I feel very honored to have been given a chance to direct an X-Men movie, given the fact that I grew up reading these comics. When I was reading the comics as a kid, I didn’t even know if there’d be X-Men movies, let alone that I’d be actually working on them.You mentioned growing up reading the comics. What was your relationship with the Dark Phoenix Saga?Dark Phoenix was always my favorite story growing up. It was a little bit like The Empire Strikes Back, which is my favorite movie of all time. They both were about challenging what it is to be good and evil. You were one or the other, but this comic came along and took a character that you loved and who was a hero and imbued her with a cosmic force that took her over but made her do evil, dangerous, deadly things.All of a sudden, I looked at the world differently. I felt like we all have that darkness inside of us, and certainly we still have the ability to recover as well. So, it always stuck with me. It informed a lot of the way that I just saw the world, with the way that I wrote as an artist and filmmaker. screen-shot-2019-06-04-at-18-21-22Famke Janssen played Jean in X-Men: The Last Stand, but didn’t have much to say in the latter half of that movie. 20th Century Fox/Screenshot by CNET Where do you think X-Men: The Last Stand went wrong?It’s a fair question. Otherwise we wouldn’t be making the Dark Phoenix story again.The cosmic elements of the story weren’t explored at all, but more importantly, the Dark Phoenix story became the secondary story, the B-plot of that film, and the cure plot became the A-plot of the film. The traditional heroes of the X-Men movies — Xavier, Magneto and Wolverine — became the heroes of the film and Jean really took a backseat, especially in the back half of the movie. And Famke [Janssen] (the first actor to play Jean) has like five lines of dialogue in the last half of the movie. 2:46 Wolverine 21st Century Fox Marvel Target X-Men Disney Star Wars Deadpool I … wanted to ground this movie as much as possible. Generally, I wanted it to have a bit more raw and gritty feel and a more human feel than the other X-Men movies and because of the storyline, I wanted you to really feel what she was feeling. And so I wanted to ground this fantastical supernatural thing that’s happening to Jean, this cosmic force, this possession in a way, I wanted to ground it in something real, and so we talked a lot about schizophrenia. I would send her books and articles and YouTube videos about schizophrenia and she would watch them and read them, and send me back questions and thoughts almost as fast as I could send them to her. tr-0130-v0087-mpc-1023Professor Xavier’s ego plays a major role in Dark Phoenix. 20th Century Fox I had a lot of great, extraordinary people around me on this film, but Sophie was the partner in constructing this film. I asked for more rehearsal time in this film than we’ve ever had on an X-Men movie. We had weeks of rehearsal and Sophie came to the first day of rehearsal and script had little postmarks on every single line of the screenplay, with motivation, with backstory, with subtext, with questions. And so she brought all of her natural talent, with an immense amount of preparation. img-4657Kinberg chats about the movie in London. Sean Keane/CNET Charles Xavier has a pretty fascinating arc in this movie. What was your thinking with his journey here, especially since the X-Men are surprisingly popular with the wider world in the beginning?I wanted to explore this idea that the X-Men, after so many movies where they are hated, feared, hunted and hidden, would actually be embraced by humanity. With all of the characters I wanted to explore a new side of them that we hadn’t seen in the other movies.And with Charles specifically, I wanted to deal with his ego. There is an aspect to a man who names a superhero team essentially after himself and has a mansion. Or he has a bunch of kids that he feels like he’s the sort of patriarch or father to — there’s an element of ego to that. Even the sort of spiffy suits he’s always wearing in movies, even that has as an element of ego to it, the fanciness of his wheelchair. There’s been a lot of evidence of his ego in these movies but it’s never really been like delved into and challenged. And so the movie starts, like you say, where they are superheroes. And he’s being lauded by the President at the White House. And then over the span of the movie what you see — and it resembles the world in which we live — is that just the slightest incident sparks or re-sparks prejudice and fear from the people who had been persecuting and oppressing this, I guess, minority of mutants for so long. I had this notion that maybe Charles changed everyone’s mind. Because he could!Yeah. A lot of them certainly.spoilers-mcuThe soldiers near the end were part of the “Mutant Containment Unit” — was that a deliberate reference to the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU)?Kinberg: It actually wasn’t initially. My production designer came to me about the designs for the train. I was trying all kinds of different names. It all felt like a little too prisony and normal, and it didn’t also pertain to the mutants. And they came up with the idea of “Mutant Containment,” which felt correct, and then the costume designer had to create patches for the soldiers and so “Mutant Containment Unit” is what he came to me with and I obviously immediately recognized that the acronym was MCU. We kind of didn’t have time to do anything else. But also, I love Kevin Feige. He’s somebody who produced the first X-Men movie I ever worked on. I mean, he is quite literally the most successful producer of all time. What he’s done with the MCU is beyond imagination for someone like me who grew up a fan of the comics. So I put it in there as sort of like a wink and smile with respect to the MCU and by the end of the movie that MCU soldiers are fighting alongside the X-Men. I felt like this was the last X-Men movie in this current incarnation. Did you approach it like that?Yes absolutely, from the beginning of writing the movie, which was three years or so ago, I approached it as the culmination, the climax of this particular saga of the X-Men. This cycle of X-Men storytelling that started with, really 20 years ago, and especially with the X-Men: First Class.I felt like with these characters that were strangers, with the X-Men: First Class, they were strangers that came together, formed this family, this unit. This film, that is based on obviously the most iconic and the most popular of X-Men stories, this film splits this family apart, challenges this family, forces this family to face trauma in a way that they never had before. And that was a natural climax and culmination for 10 plus years of storytelling. You can find out if Kinberg succeeded by reading CNET’s X-Men: Dark Phoenix review. Tags Best geek movies of the decade Originally published June 4.Update, June 7: Adds details about MCU Easter egg. X-Men: Dark Phoenix: A Jean Grey history lesson Share your voice 21 Photos Now playing: Watch this: TV and Movies Culture Interesting, I’ll have to watch it again.I haven’t watched it a long time, but [she has] very few lines. And listen, I say all of this with the blood on my hands of being the co-writer of the movie, so it’s not as though I’m judging anyone. But it didn’t focus on what is the greatest storyline in the history of X-Men comics and potentially all comics. That story itself is too much for one movie, let alone to be the background story of someone else’s movie.And it’s the reason I was so desperate to get a chance to tell the proper version of the Dark Phoenix story to really tell a movie where Jean was a hero and the villain and the focus the film, where you really got into the moral, emotional, psychological complexity of what’s happened to her character. And I didn’t know if I would be able to do that but when I wrote Days of Future Past and retooled the timeline, it suddenly became possible to tell the Dark Phoenix story again.x-men-days-of-future-pastSimon Kinberg (left) directs Michael Fassbender in X-Men: Dark Phoenix. Doane Gregory/20th Century Fox I remember my mind reeling with possibilities after Days of Future Past. And I try not to think too much about the timelines of the X-men movies because my brain explodes.I have a sense of what the timelines are and I can walk people through them, but certainly there is a looseness to them that over the years we’ve tried to stitch back together.They’re not told with the same level of precision that some of the franchises have been told because they’ve been handed off from filmmaker to filmmaker. And I think … sometimes we’ve just told stories that were one-off stories. We told them the best we could, not necessarily thinking they’re part of a larger tapestry of storytelling. What do you think Sophie Turner brought to Jean here?She has a combination of incredible strength and power, with real vulnerability and fragility. And what Jean Grey’s going through, especially in this movie, requires both. I mean she’s the most powerful creature, not just mutant, she’s the most powerful force in the entire galaxy. And yet she can’t control that power.So you need the humanity of the lack of control and the struggle and the trauma of that, with the power and strength of someone who actually could take out the most powerful mutants on Earth and beyond. sr-6050-v0007-sho-1035X-Men in spaaaaace! Nightcrawler, Jean and their friends go beyond Earth’s orbit on a rescue mission. 20th Century Fox I sat down with Sophie about a year before we started shooting, and said, “Listen, you’re gonna have to occupy and explore the entire spectrum of psychological emotional colors. You’re gonna have to go to some very dark, difficult places. And you’re gonna be doing it going toe-to-toe in scenes with the greatest actors of all time, or at least of our time, you know, Jennifer Lawrence, Michael Fassbender, James McAvoy, Jessica Chastain. And you’re the center of this film.”And I’m saying this to, I don’t know what she was at the time, 19, 20 years old. At 19, 20 years old, I barely could get myself to a class in college, let alone handle that.last_img read more

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Foreign Investors Take Flight following Negative Global Cues

first_imgForeign Portfolio Investors (FPIs) became net sellers in the Indian equities market for the second consecutive week, following negative global and slow domestic reforms which dented sentiments.The foreign institutional investors (FIIs) along with sub-accounts and qualified foreign investors have been clubbed together by market regulator Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) to create a new investor category called FPIs.The FPIs went on a selling spree by shedding-off shares worth $200.33 million.For the week ended Oct 10, the FPIs massively sold stocks worth ₹1,231.28 crore or $200.33 million, according to data with the National Securities Depository Limited (NSDL).The FPIs only infused $49.65 million or ₹306.42 crore in the week under review.However, the FPIs were net-buyers on Friday. They bought in shares worth $2.29 million, or ₹13.98 crore, on Oct 10.For the week ended Oct 1, the FPIs had massively sold stocks worth ₹653.95 crore or $105.29 million.For the week ended Sep 26, the FPIs had sold stocks worth ₹2,487.02 crore and had only bought shares worth $75.40 million or ₹458.34 crore.The week ended Sep 19 saw the FPIs buying shares worth $354.24 million or ₹2,159.67, which helped propel the Indian equities market to subsequent new highs.Negative international cues were cited as a major cause for FPIs pulling back. One of the main reasons cited was Germany industrial output figures which posted its worst fall for five and a half years.Anxiety was further added with the start of the second quarter results season which kicked of in the week under review.A week before’s RBI decision to maintain key interest rates was also a dampner. The RBI left key interest rates unchanged stating that the country is currently positioned to reach the inflation target of six percent by January 2016.It has retained the economy’s growth projection for current fiscal at 5.5% and said the future policy stance will be influenced by the inflation outlook.The status quo in these key policy rates mean the equated monthly instalments (EMIs) on home, auto and other loans would remain unchanged as these rates determine lending and borrowing rates of the commercial banks.This could put in a spanner in the festive season sales.However, the US Federal Reserve hinting that interest rates will stay near zero level for a “considerable time” rebounded FPIs interest in the Indian markets.”Continuing concerns over global growth impacted the global markets over the week and India was no exception. The lack of foreign flows resulted in subdued sentiments,”said Dipen Shah, head- private client group research, Kotak Securities.According to Shah, going ahead, the quarterly results will dictate stock specific action.”Infosys has started the season on a positive note. Markets will eagerly look forward to important reforms decisions from the government eg. coal linkages, gas pricing, which will provide further impetus to the domestic investment and infrastructure related sectors,” Shah said.”Positive news on these fronts will improve sentiments and allow markets to seek higher levels.”Dogged by the weak FPI sentiment, the benchmark index of the Indian equities markets lost nearly a percent in the week trade which ended Oct 10.The week which started post an extended weekend holiday on Tuesday saw the markets decline by 1.01% at Friday’s closing of 26,297.38 points.last_img read more

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