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Serena working to reduce mental stress, expectation

first_img “You don’t play that many perfect matches. That’s one thing I’ve been working on in this off-season loosely,” the 39-year-old told reporters on Monday after her opening 7-6(2) 6-0 win over fellow American Kristie Ahn at Roland Garros.”But it’s just understanding that I have to let go of expectation. That doesn’t mean I’m lowering my expectations. It just means I’m having realistic expectations of not winning every point, every game, every shot.”It sounds crazy, but that’s me and that’s what makes me me. I’m Serena. At some point I’m always going to have some level of perfection, but I just need to have a more reasonable level so I cannot put so much stress on me mentally.”Williams feels she puts more pressure on herself by striving for perfection in everything she does. Serena Williams says she has been working on reducing her mental stress and making herself understand that she cannot possibly win every point on court as her chase of a record-equaling 24th Grand Slam title continues at the French Open.The American won her 23rd major title at the Australian Open in 2017 before taking a break to give birth to her daughter.She has reached four Slam finals since returning to the circuit in 2018 but has been denied every time as she remains one major title behind Australian Margaret Court. She did not play a lead-up event on clay before Roland Garros and her last match before the French Open was a semi-final defeat by Victoria Azarenka on the US Open hardcourts.Williams also had an Achilles injury in that match which forced her to withdraw from the Italian Open in Rome.Asked what she was doing to manage the injury, Williams said: “A ton of prayer. I’m doing so much for it.”I did so much for it at Patrick’s [coach Mouratoglou’s] academy, like I went straight from New York directly to his academy and started rehabbing it.”One of the reasons I came into [speak to the] press a little bit earlier than normal [is] because I need to get back and start the protocol all over again. So just kind of rehab that, laser, ice, just a lot… of stuff on it.” center_img Topics :last_img read more

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Potential-plus with this huge allotment

first_imgThe home offered the potential to create a double holding incomeRochedale is undergoing a transformation.The suburb offers a mix of contemporary dwellings on new allotments, development sites and long-term holdings with the ability to subdivide in the future.The golden ticket is landing a property that will one day be a prime project, but can also create a current holding income to help service the debt.That’s exactly where 6 Gardner Rd, Rochedale slots into the mix.With multiple immediate and future possibilities, this 9182sq m property was always going to be a prized acquisition.The property sold at auction for $2.015 million and provides triple-income potential for its new owners, according to selling agent at Yong Real Estate, Nahi Shahwani.Mr Shahwani said the circa 2000 brick home was in great condition and provided six-bedroom, three-bathroom accommodation across two levels.It’s a big, functional home with potential to add a dual income.“They have the chance to take two families,” Mr Shahwani says.“Upstairs has three bedrooms — all of them are very big — two bathrooms and a massive lounge.”Mr Shahwani said the second area downstairs could effectively be self-contained.The rental options don’t end there, however, as there’s a 250sq m shed with workshop/storage and office.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020“They have a massive shed and they’re currently running a business there,” Mr Shahwani said.Mr Shahwani said the auction was well attended with the property eventually purchased by a Chinese buyer who could see Rochedale’s potential for growth.“We had seven registered bidders. Four of them competed,” he said. “It started at $1 million but it got where the emotion of the buyers came up so it went very quickly climbing to arrive at around $2 million and then slowed.”Mr Shahwani said the eventual buyer had been active in the area and was willing to pay what was needed to acquire the right properties with potential.“They’re still looking for acreage and with an unlimited budget,” he said.Mr Shahwani said these properties were fairly rare so competition was hot and the recent auction had unearthed other cashed-up future developers too.“Not many properties come up around in that area,” he said.“In fact, since I’ve had that property I’ve had a lot of inquiry and we had several interested bidders … the others are still looking in the same area.“The market is very hot particularly — a very desirable area for Chinese buyers.”last_img read more

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Video: Reaction to NBA’s ban of Clippers owner Donald Sterling

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Amid racially charged comments attributed to him in a released audiotape, Clippers owner Donald Sterling faces a lifetime suspension, $2.5 million fine and a possible forced sale of the franchise, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver announced in a press conference Tuesday in New York. Los Angeles News Group reporters asked fans, officials and local business owners about their reaction to the decision. See all of the reaction videos to the Sterling decision here.last_img

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Parents using religion to avoid kids’ shots

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.“Do I think that religious exemptions have become the default? Absolutely,” said Dr. Paul Offit, head of infectious diseases at Children’s Hospital in Philadelphia and one of the harshest critics of the anti-vaccine movement. He said the resistance to vaccines is “an irrational, fear-based decision.” The number of exemptions is extremely small in percentage terms and represents just a few thousand of the 3.7 million children entering kindergarten in 2005, the most recent figure available. But public health officials say it takes only a few people to cause an outbreak that can put large numbers of lives at risk. “When you choose not to get a vaccine, you’re not just making a choice for yourself, you’re making a choice for the person sitting next to you,” said Dr. Lance Rodewald, director of the CDC’s Immunization Services Division. All states have some requirement that youngsters be immunized against such childhood diseases as measles, mumps, chickenpox, diphtheria and whooping cough. Twenty-eight states, including Florida, Massachusetts and New York, allow parents to opt out for medical or religious reasons only. Twenty other states, among them California, Pennsylvania, Texas and Ohio, also allow parents to cite personal or philosophical reasons. Mississippi and West Virginia allow exemptions for medical reasons only. From 2003 to 2007, religious exemptions for kindergartners increased, in some cases doubled or tripled, in 20 of the 28 states that allow only medical or religious exemptions, the AP found. Religious exemptions decreased in three of these states – Nebraska, Wyoming, South Carolina – and were unchanged in five others. The rate of exemption requests is also increasing. For example, in Massachusetts, the rate of those seeking exemptions has more than doubled in the past decade – from 0.24 percent, or 210, in 1996 to 0.60 percent, or 474, in 2006. In Florida, 1,249 children claimed religious exemptions in 2006, almost double the 661 who did so just four years earlier. That was an increase of 0.3 percent to 0.6 percent of the student population. Georgia, New Hampshire and Alabama saw their rates double in the past four years. The numbers from the various states cannot be added up with accuracy. Some states used a sampling of students to gauge levels of vaccinations. Others surveyed all or nearly all students. Fifteen of the 20 states that allow both religious and philosophical exemptions have seen increases in both, according to the AP’s findings. While some parents – Christian Scientists and certain fundamentalists, for example – have genuine religious objections to medicine, it is clear that others are simply distrustful of shots. Some parents say they are not convinced vaccinations help. Others fear that the vaccinations themselves might make their children sick and even cause autism. Even though government-funded studies have found no link between vaccines and autism, loosely organized groups of parents and even popular cultural figures such as radio host Don Imus have voiced concerns. Most of the furor on Internet message boards and Web sites has been about a mercury-based preservative once used in vaccines that some believe contributes to neurological disorders. Unvaccinated children can spread diseases to others who have not gotten their shots or those for whom vaccinations provided less-than-complete protection. In 1991, a religious group in Philadelphia that chose not to immunize its children touched off an outbreak of measles that claimed at least eight lives and sickened more than 700 people, mostly children. And in 2005, an Indiana girl who had not been immunized picked up the measles virus at an orphanage in Romania and unknowingly brought it back to a church group. Within a month, the number of people infected had grown to 31 in what health officials said was the nation’s worst outbreak of the disease in a decade. Rachel Magni, a 35-year-old stay-at-home mother in Newton, Mass., said she is afraid vaccines could harm her children and “overwhelm their bodies.” Even though she attends a Protestant church that allows vaccinations, Magni pursued a religious exemption so her 4-year-old daughter and 1-year-old son, who have never been vaccinated, could attend preschool. “I felt that the risk of the vaccine was worse than the risk of the actual disease,” she said. Barbara Loe Fisher, co-founder and president of the National Vaccine Information Center, one of the leading vaccine skeptic groups, said she discourages parents from pursuing religious exemptions unless they are genuine. Instead, Fisher said, parents should work to change the laws in their states. “We counsel that if you do not live in a state that has a philosophical exemption, you still have to obey the law,” she said. Even so, Fisher said, she empathizes with parents tempted to claim the religious exemption: “If a parent has a child who has had a deterioration after vaccination and the doctor says that’s just a coincidence, you have to keep vaccinating this child, what is the parent left with?” Offit said he knows of no state that enforces any penalty for parents who falsely claim a religious exemption. “I think that wouldn’t be worth it because that’s just such an emotional issue for people. Our country was founded on the notion of religious freedom,” he said. In 2002, four Arkansas families challenged the state’s policy allowing religious exemptions only if a parent could prove membership in a recognized religion prohibiting vaccination. The court struck down the policy and the state began allowing both religious and philosophical exemptions. Religious and medical exemptions, which had been climbing, plummeted, while the number of philosophical exemptions spiked.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! BOSTON – Sabrina Rahim doesn’t practice any particular faith, but she had no problem signing a letter declaring that because of her deeply held religious beliefs, her 4-year-old son should be exempt from the vaccinations required to enter preschool. She is among a small but growing number of parents around the country who are claiming religious exemptions to avoid vaccinating their children when the real reason may be skepticism of the shots or concern they can cause other illnesses. Some of these parents say they are being forced to lie because of the way the vaccination laws are written in their states. “It’s misleading,” Rahim admitted, but she said she fears that earlier vaccinations may be to blame for her son’s autism. “I find it very troubling, but for my son’s safety, I feel this is the only option we have.” An Associated Press examination of states’ vaccination records and data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that many states are seeing increases in the rate of religious exemptions claimed for kindergartners. last_img read more

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