Tag: 唔准唔开心 论坛

Oakland Athletics fall prey to Madison Bumgarner gem in Bay Bridge Series loss

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceSAN FRANCISCO — The A’s fell to the Giants, 3-2, on Tuesday night at Oracle Park.Brett Anderson was spinning his own kind of gem against the Giants, allowing just three hits in five innings. But Buster Posey, Evan Longoria and Kevin Pillar knocked back-to-back-to-back doubles in the sixth inning, allowing the Giants a one-run lead. He left the game having allowed those two earned runs in six innings, striking out …last_img

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Farmer-led movement for soil health receives $4 million boost

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A revolutionary effort to support on-farm conservation has added a new partner representing major agricultural companies, food companies and environmental groups. The new collaboration will accelerate the Soil Health Partnership‘s leadership in helping farmers adopt practices that protect natural resources while potentially increasing profits.At the Farm Progress Show in Boone, Iowa, the industry-leading companies and environmental organizations today announced the launch of the Midwest Row Crop Collaborative. Its goal is to support, enhance and accelerate the use of environmentally preferable agricultural practices.The Midwest Row Crop Collaborative’s founding members include Cargill, the Environmental Defense Fund, General Mills, Kellogg Company, Monsanto, PepsiCo, The Nature Conservancy, Walmart and the World Wildlife Fund.  The overall shared goal is to help achieve a 45% nutrient loss reduction by 2035 across the Upper Mississippi River Basin – chiefly nitrogen and phosphorus.As part of this effort, the Collaborative has committed to raise $4 million over five years to augment the Soil Health Partnership, a farmer-led initiative of the National Corn Growers Association established in 2014.With more than 65 farm sites already enrolled in nine Midwestern states, the new funding commitment recognizes SHP as the leader in field-scale testing and measuring of management practices that improve soil health. These practices include:Growing cover crops to prevent erosion and nutrient losses,Implementing conservation tillage like no-till or strip-till, andUsing advanced, science-based nutrient management techniques to reduce nutrient loss.“Through healthy soil, farmers can play a major role protecting water quality and the environment-while also optimizing their crop yields and economic returns,” said Nick Goeser, director of the SHP. “We’re honored to welcome the Midwest Row Crop Collaborative to our program. Their support will amplify our research and communications efforts in helping farmers find practices that work best for them.”The new alliance will help SHP achieve the goal of enrolling 100 farms a full two years earlier than planned. It also underscores SHP’s key milestones and early vision, a vision advanced by initial and continuing funding from Monsanto, Walton Family Foundation, NCGA and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. These early supporters helped form SHP’s operating and data collection structure, while recognizing common goals.“As a farmer, I am committed to soil health because I know we have to constantly improve how we care for our land and how we farm it,” said Roger Zylstra, a farmer in Lynnville, Iowa enrolled in the SHP. “This funding commitment is significant to me because now we have more support from the large food and ag companies as well as environmental groups pushing for change. They’re showing us we don’t have to do it alone.”last_img read more

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Field Talk: A Q&A with Providers Supporting Military Families

first_imgDiPietro-Wells, R. (2015). Field Talk: A Q&AField Talk is a monthly blog post sharing the voices of early childhood providers who serve or have served military families of young children with disabilities (birth to 5 years old).  We hope you find it to be educational, personable, and encouraging.This month we talked with Nicole Withrow PhD, MS, RDN.  Dr. Withrow is an Assistant Professor/Dietetic Internship Coordinator at the University of Northern Colorado and a Pediatric Clinical Registered Dietitian Nutritionist at Colorado Children’s Hospital.  This interview has been edited for length and clarity.Describe your current role. I am an Assistant Professor and Dietetic Internship Coordinator for the University of Northern Colorado. I develop and maintain courses for graduate and undergraduate students. Currently, I have 30 dietetic interns nationwide who are completing an accredited dietetic internship. The internship is accredited through the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and each intern must complete 1200 supervised practice hours. Along with teaching responsibilities and maintaining an internship, I am involved in conducting research in Autism Spectrum Disorders.Recently, I created the Sensory Processing, Aberrant Mealtime, Motor, Inventory for Eating (SAMIE). It is a screening inventory for children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder and will be used in the community, hospitals, private practices, and residential facilities. I am currently in the copyright and publication process with this inventory and hope to have that completed within the next 3-6 months. In addition to my University position, I am a consultant for the Center for Discovery, a residential program in New York for individuals with disabilities, and a pediatric clinical dietitian at the Colorado Children’s Hospital for children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder.What’s your favorite part of your current job? I absolutely love having opportunities to wear several hats in the field of nutrition. I thrive when I am educating individuals and helping minimize the struggles of families and individuals due to a disability, specifically Autism Spectrum Disorders. I also enjoy conducting research.What “insider” tips or advice do you have for service providers working with military families who have young children with disabilities?I would suggest collaborating with the team of providers who are treating the child. I would say less is more when it comes to recommendations and if families are working with an Occupational Therapist, Speech and Language Pathologist and/or behavioral therapist they should work to make goals that complement each other’s specialty area.If you could change or improve one thing for military families with young children with disabilities, what would it be?I would like screening of problematic eating behaviors to occur earlier since they appear to be long-standing and without prior diagnosis and treatment they could have long-term health consequences.What are some strategies or resources useful in supporting a family whose child has a limited repertoire of food? One of the most important things to remember is that there can be numerous reasons a child prefers a limited variety of foods and understanding them, and treating them will help with increasing the variety of foods that a child will accept and consume. Reasons a child may struggle with accepting new foods are: sensory processing impairments, oral motor, core deficits of an ASD (rigidity/need for things to be the same), anxiety, gastrointestinal dysfunction and dental caries (cavities).When introducing a new food, be mindful that it may take more than 10 exposures of a bite size of food before a child looks, licks, touches, or tastes the food item. Only serve a bite size so that he/she is not overwhelmed by the quantity and shuts down, immediately. If a child looks, licks, touches, tastes the food item, positively reinforce him/her with verbal praise. Then continue to offer the food and increase the quantity slowly.Another tip is to introduce “like/similar” foods. For example, if a child likes McDonald’s chicken nuggets, purchase a bag of frozen nuggets and serve one every time you serve a McDonald’s chicken nugget. Also, pair language with food, “same but different.”How do you balance nutritional needs given a child’s food tendencies and preferences? What strategies can a provider use to help a parent ensure their child’s nutritional needs are being met in such instances? (For example, a child who will only eat crunchy foods, or foods at a very hot temperature)This is difficult since increasing a food repertoire takes time. I recommend a multivitamin in order to decrease risk of Vitamins C and D, and as well as iron deficiencies. If your child drinks juice, be mindful to purchase fortified juices (i.e., orange juice that has calcium and Vitamin D added to it). If your child only eats crunchy foods then you can bake foods, offer raw fruits/vegetables, or freeze fruits/vegetables – be creative! Again, if your child prefers only a few food items continue offering a new bite size food item with them.What are some strategies that providers can use to help families introduce new foods that are outside of a child’s preference? For example, helping a family introduce new foods when their child will only eat a food of a particular color or texture.Start with a food history and you may notice that at age 1-2 the child ate more foods. Bring those back into their diets, but only a bite size and with repeated exposures. If your child only eats a particular color/temperature/texture then start there and build in different types of foods, but a bite size. Research illustrates that if a child does not get help for food selectivity before the age of 8 then it is more difficult to treat and nutritional risk may become an issue. If a child will only eat chewy foods then offer a gummy vitamin, if they only eat crunchy foods then offer a Flintstone crunchy multivitamin, if they do not eat them right away offer the vitamin every day at breakfast, lunch or dinner. You may also want to add a calcium and Vitamin D supplement in a powder form called Dari Free. You can order it online through Vance’s Foods and it can be mixed into a food or beverage – it has no taste!Could you please talk about food chaining and how to implement it?Food chaining is a type of feeding/eating intervention that assists in expanding an individual’s food repertoire. This process builds upon a preferred food and based on the individual. One may also need to start with a similar color/texture/type, depending on the primary reason for food selectivity. For example: A child prefers McDonalds french fries, therefore start with those while also purchasing a bag of frozen shoestring fries. Prepare a couple of frozen shoestring fries and serve them with the preferred food. Once the child tolerates them, increase the quantity of the prepared frozen shoestring fries and reduce the McDonald’s fries. This process should be repeated by introducing another type of frozen fry (waffle/steak cut/curly/fresh potato wedges). Once the child is eating a variety of fries, the end goal is a baked potato. After the baked potato is well received, introduce a sweet potato.Are there certain vitamins or minerals you have found that improve the symptoms of autism?There is not a lot of evidence-based research to support many of the supplements that are currently being used to remediate symptoms of an ASD. However, more research is being done. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that acts as a mild mood stabilizer and has a role in muscle function and the immune system. Vitamin D is also needed to assist in the absorption of calcium. I often recommend supplementing with this vitamin, especially if the child is on a gluten and casein free diet.Another supplement I often recommend is a multivitamin, especially if an individual is food selective or a “picky eater” and has been for quite some time. Vitamin C deficiency (scurvy) has been diagnosed in individuals with developmental disabilities who have food selectivity. This can be avoided with a multivitamin while working on increasing the individual’s food repertoire.Flavored cod liver oil is often used to aid in immune function and cognitive function, plus it has anti-inflammatory properties.Are there any studies evaluating the effectiveness of special diets (i.e. gluten free, casein free, etc.)? Can you expand on or speak to them? There are minimal double-blinded trials, the gold standard for gluten and casein free, so many of the results are anecdotal. There is one- 12-week double-blinded gluten free, casein free (GFCF) trial with a crossover at the conclusion of 6 weeks. n= 15 individuals w/ASD (ages 2-16)Behavioral assessments were done at baseline, weeks 6 and 12, and urinary peptides screened at weeks 1, 3, 6, 9, 12. The results illustrated no significant differences. However, 9 of the15 parents reported that they would continue the GFCF diet (Elder, 2006).However, even with limited research, the gluten and casein free diet is the most popular dietary intervention to treat individuals with ASD (Levy & Hyman, 2003). The diet is popular due to the belief in its safety, non invasiveness, healthiness, and the anecdotal reports of improvements in symptoms of children with ASD.According to the Autism Research Institute’s recent survey of 2208 parents regarding the gluten and casein free diet, 65% of parents reported subjective improvements in children’s autism symptoms (decrease in self-stimulatory behaviors-flapping, rocking), maladaptive behaviors, GI improvements seen, and an increase in communication (use of words).For parents who do choose a GFCF diet, it seems much harder to get adequate nutrition for the child. What do you suggest?” It is not as difficult to consume an adequate diet on a GFCF today due to several fortified foods (i.e., breakfast cereals, juices, rice/soy milk, gf breads/waffles, etc). I would recommend adding a multivitamin and calcium supplement with a Vitamin D supplement if the child is food selective.Another resource regarding feeding concerns and nutrition in children with autism spectrum disorders can be found in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders [1].  This article was recently discussed here.[1]  Sharp, W. G., Berry, R. C., Mccracken, C., Nuhu, N. N., Marvel, E., Saulnier, C. A., . . . Jaquess, D. L. (2013). Feeding Problems and Nutrient Intake in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Meta-analysis and Comprehensive Review of the Literature. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders,43(9), 2159-2173. doi:10.1007/s10803-013-1771-5This post was edited by Robyn DiPietro-Wells & Michaelene Ostrosky, PhD, members of the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, onTwitter, and YouTube.last_img read more

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NAB 2018: LaCie’s Rugged Hard Drive Gets Tougher

first_imgLaCie’s popular, rugged, and portable hard drive gets tougher in its latest iteration, unveiled this week at the 2018 NAB Show.Already a staple in the film and video production industry as the go-to device for rough-and-tumble file storage, LaCie has unveiled their new Rugged RAID Pro at NAB 2018. While the orange-rimmed look remains the same, the technology has been updated, and it includes more storage, faster writing, new features, and even greater protection from the elements.Let’s take a look at all the new features.Faster and More SecureIt’s already one of the most durable hard drives on the market, but the new Rugged RAID Pro offers unparalleled water, drop, and shock resistance, along with some sophisticated hardware encryption. The new RAID Pro has an interface transfer rate of 240 MB/s, which should be good enough for a digital workflow on the go, even with 4K and RAW footage uploads (as you can see in their video with a RED camera setup). Like the rest of the line, the RAID Pro can take a lot of punishment and resist up to one ton of pressure.4 TB CompactThe Rugged RAID Pro also offers an improved storage capacity up to 4 TBs, making it a top-of-the-line offering. LaCie seems to be hyper-focused on run-and-gun warriors and backpack adventurers who need a highly reliable product to transfer, store, and back up footage in the craziest of conditions. If you’re looking for even more external storage options at home or in the office, here are some great alternatives.Built-in SDTo fully cater to run-and-gun shooters, LaCie also has announced that the Rugged RAID Pro features a built-in integrated SD card reader for direct uploads. You can see in the video that you can still use a USB 3.0 adapter, but if you’re traveling without a laptop, SD card-reading is yet another handy element.For more NAB 2018 news and hard drive resources, check out these resources:NAB 2018 Announcement: The Sony FS5 Gets an UpdateThe Best External Hard Drives for Video EditorsHow to Format External Hard Drives for Mac and Windowslast_img read more

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Your Operations Team Is Not Prospecting For You

first_imgUnless you were hired to be a customer service representative, you are not supposed to be doing customer service. If you weren’t hired to follow up on every operational issues, be it an incorrect invoice, a shipment, or some other failure, this work is not for you.Make no mistake here, you do own the outcomes you sold your client. You are responsible for ensuring their success with what you sold them. If you want an absolute right to the next deal, you have to earn that right by making sure your client gets first class service on their first deal with you. That said, you do not own the responsibility for all the transactions that make up that outcome, most of which you have nothing to do with, and with good reason: you are not in operations.What is most important to recognize here is your role and your responsibility. If you are not selling because you are doing operational work, then no one is selling. If no one is selling, then the future clients that you are supposed be pursuing and gaining for the organization are not being pursued or gained.When you are retyping an invoice or calling to follow up on a shipment, you are not selling. Your operations team, the people who are supposed to be doing these things, are not selling either.Your operations team doesn’t pick up the phone and cold call for you while you are correcting an invoice. They don’t nurture the relationships with your dream clients for you, sharing some insight that is going to gain their attention and establish you as the person with the ideas and ability to help them produce better results.The operations people aren’t sitting in discovery meetings, asking to meet additional stakeholders to collaborate and build consensus around the right solution, presenting ideas and proposals, or negotiating the terms of a deal, and asking for the commitment to buy.If you are not doing this work, it is not being done for you. This is true even if you are doing someone else’s work for them.I am not suggesting that you are not part of a team, and that you shouldn’t be a team player. By all means, take the first call from the angry client before passing off the responsibility to correct whatever went wrong to the person responsible for correcting it. Make the follow up call to ensure your client got what they needed. In between these two calls, give the tasks to the people who own them, so you can get back to selling. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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