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African inspired design seals deal for buyers ahead of auction

first_img151 Sir Bruce Small Blvd, Benowa Waters.African baskets, art and tropical plants fill the large spaces.“We needed a lot of wall space because we love showcasing art,” Mrs Planting said. 151 Sir Bruce Small Blvd, Benowa Waters was built to showcase art.“That was one of the requirements we gave the architect, that when you opened the front door you would have a long, unobstructed view down the hallway to the water,” Mrs Planting said.While the house is big on space Mrs Planting said it is designed to feel like you’re living in two villas. African baskets feature across the foyer wall. Homeowners Helen and Johan Planting built the six-bedroom house with the help of architect Shane Denman.Commanding the street the house has an extensive use of raw materials including timber, marble and stone.The couple who built their stunning family home five years ago said they bought the block of land and started from scratch.“The design took about six months,” she said.“We didn’t have Pinterest or much online inspiration at the time, it was mostly ideas we pulled from magazines and our travels to South Africa and around the world.“My husband Johan’s family is South African and we used that as inspiration in the design.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North4 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day ago 151 Sir Bruce Small Blvd, Benowa Waters.“The water feature separates the back of the home so when you’re in the main bedroom you can look out and feel like you are completely detached from the next room,” she said.“We focused a lot on raw materials like marble and wicker and although I am a big fan of trends we wanted a family home that was modern and elegant but a place you could live in and enjoy comfortably.”center_img The house comes with a slice of South African style“We gave our architect photos from our travels and photos of angles on houses we liked and he was able to use that to design a house that matched our personality.”The mammoth sized front door opens to reveal an African-style and captures a striking riverfront view. 151 Sir Bruce Small Blvd, Benowa Waters.A JAW-DROPPING South African-inspired mansion has sold before auction. The house at 151 Sir Bruce Small Blvd which featured on the cover of the Gold Coast Bulletin’s Real Estate glossy magazine on August 19 sold to a Gold Coast couple last week. Ray White Surfers Paradise agent Sherry Smith negotiated the sale but has not yet revealed the price.last_img read more

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Bernardino backs pensions stakeholder group amid merger concerns

first_img“Our position, and my personal position, is very clear on this – I would definitely advocate the current situation and to continue to have a specific pensions stakeholder group,” he told IPE.“When we started at EIOPA we were concerned about the complexities of managing two stakeholder groups, and the dimensions of this.“It is of course complex, but to be frank, after the three and half years I definitely see the value in having individual stakeholder groups for insurance and pensions.”The Commission proposed the idea alongside funding ESAs through a direct industry levy rather than the EU budget.At the time, members of the current occupational pensions stakeholder group (OPSG) told IPE a merged group would become dominated by insurance, leaving debate on pensions issues very restricted.Representative groups from the UK, Ireland and Netherlands all said their organisations would be concerned if a merger went ahead as the specificities of pensions needed addressing.The review into ESAs will now form part of the brief for new financial stability, financial services and capital markets union Commissioner, Jonathan Hill, who is expected to take up his post later this year.However, Bernardino remained adamant and said once consulted, his organisation would express the desire to operate two working groups.“Of course there are common issues, such as the work on personal pensions, and the two stakeholder groups and working together on this. “The collective work is good and we welcome that,” he said. “But there are differences. They are different types of markets and there are different types of issues.”The review into ESA working groups also looked at the proportion of representation from pension funds and small and medium size businesses, causing further issues for pensions representatives. The chairman of the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA) has spoken out against plans to merge the organisation’s separate insurance and pensions stakeholder groups.The European Commission (EC) recently published a review of the European Supervisory Authorities (ESAs), of which EIOPA is one, and said all authorities should only operate one stakeholder group.EIOPA is the only ESA to operate two groups, meaning the EC’s plans would effectively see a merger of the insurance and pensions divisions.Gabriel Bernardino, chairman of EIOPA, said he was strongly against the Commission’s idea and stressed it originated from an industry consultantation and not from his organisation.last_img read more

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The Latest: IIHF cancels 2020 Ice Hockey World Championship

first_imgEven though his side could potentially reach the Champions League quarterfinals, Lyon President Jean-Michel Aulas wants the French league to take priority.Matches in both competitions are currently suspended because of the coronavirus outbreak.“If we want to save the (French) league we must absolutely finish before June 30,” Aulas told RTL radio. “You have to make choices, be brave. Drop the Champions League, the (domestic) cup finals and international matches. Concentrate only on the (French) league.”Aulas added: “I want the league to finish. Even in empty stadiums.”Lyon leads Italian champion Juventus 1-0 from the first leg of their last-16 match in the Champions League on Feb. 26. The return leg in Turin has not been played because of the outbreak. USATF joins USA Swimming, which sent a similar letter to the USOPC on Thursday. The USOPC leadership has been in agreement with the IOC, that it’s too soon to make any decisions regarding postponing the games.___Brazil’s Olympic Committee has called for the Tokyo Olympic Games to be postponed until 2021. The Brazilian body said in a statement published on Saturday that the decision is a necessity due to the seriousness of the pandemic and “the consequent difficulty for athletes to keep their best competitive level.” Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditThe Latest on the effect of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:___The IIHF Council has confirmed that the 2020 Ice Hockey World Championship scheduled to take place in Zurich and Lausanne has been cancelled because of the ongoing coronavirus outbreak. The decision to cancel the tournament didn’t come as a surprise after IIHF President René Fasel acknowledged the likelihood of that happening following an IIHF executive committee conference call Tuesday.Fasel cited numerous challenges facing officials, ranging from health directives in place limiting attendance to travel bans making it difficult for nations to send their teams. Another issue was players lacking practice time, with most of world’s hockey leagues having either indefinitely suspended or canceled their seasons.On Monday, the NHL announced it will wait 45 days before it can provide guidance on when teams can potential reopen practice.“It’s really scary,” said Fasel, who lives in Switzerland. “Europe is just collapsed. It’s really a strange feeling. Our neighbors yesterday, the federal counsel decided to close all the restaurants and everything. It’s like war.”___ March 21, 2020 Therefore its impact is greater on those on the highest salaries, in terms of lost revenue. A player earning 300,000 euros net per month will only get 252,000 euros from the club plus 5,400 euros from the state for a monthly loss of around 42,600 euros per month. If the suspension lasts a year, this would add up to about half a million euros per year.___The U.S. track federation added its name to a growing chorus of calls to postpone the Tokyo Games because of the coronavirus. In a letter to the CEO of the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee, USA Track and Field CEO Max Siegel urged the federation to advocate for the postponement of the Games, which are to start July 24. ___Marseille President Frank McCourt wrote to reassure the French soccer club’s employees after they were put on temporary, technical layoffs.“I am taking a few minutes to make sure you and your families are well,” McCourt said. “We are going through this difficult time together and we’re seeing governments getting better and better organized.”Marseille and other top-tier clubs have started putting players on temporary, technical layoffs, which translates to a cut in pay of 16 percent with the state picking up a portion of that to a monthly maximum of 5,400 euros ($5,810). A player earning 40,000 euros ($43,000) net per month would receive 39,000 (about $42,000).center_img The Latest: IIHF cancels 2020 Ice Hockey World Championship The owners of the Boston Bruins say they have established a $1.5 million fund for employees of the team and TD Garden who have lost work because of the suspension of the NHL season.The Bruins were the last team in the league to commit to taking care of part-time and game-day employees.According to a statement from the team, the Jacobs family would help workers “who will be financially burdened if the six remaining regular season Bruins games are not played.”The NHL suspended its season on March 12 in response to the coronavirus pandemic.___ Hamilton said that “I did speak to my doctor and double checked if I needed to take a test but, the truth is there is a limited amount of tests available and there are people who need it more than I do.”___More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6 It also said that it continues to “trust in the International Olympic Committee.” Brazil organized the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro, the first in South America.___Formula One champion Lewis Hamilton says he has been self-isolating for more than a week after meeting people who later tested positive for the new coronavirus.Hamilton was at a charity event in London on March 4 also attended by actor Idris Elba and Sophie Grégoire Trudeau, the wife of the Canadian prime minister. Both were later found to have the virus.In a message on social media, Hamilton says he’s shown “zero symptoms” but has been isolating himself from other people ever since March 13, when the Australian Grand Prix was called off. Associated Press last_img read more

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Chancellor Kent Syverud among attendees at Syracuse men’s basketball watch party in Schine

first_img Published on April 3, 2016 at 1:06 am Contact Alexa: atorrens@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+ A piece of paper that read “Reserved for Chancellor” was taped to a small table in the Schine Student Center on Saturday night. A student sat on the chair before it, eyes set on the projector showing Syracuse in a hopeful but ultimately hopeless battle against North Carolina.The actual chancellor of Syracuse University spent the majority of the first half pacing the perimeter between the food court area of Schine Dining and the dining area. He cheered and clapped quietly when the men’s basketball team scored, but his nervousness showed as he moved from place to place, at one point receding behind the curtain separating the food court and dining area.Syverud said he’d been nervous that way twice before in the Tournament, and the team had turned it around both those times. But Syracuse couldn’t turn it around on Saturday.Despite Syracuse’s unsuccessful attempts to play catch-up for the majority of the game, the nervous energy in Schine remained hopeful. Every SU point resulted in claps and cheers, and, eventually, the sighs and groans for every North Carolina point quieted down. Watch party attendees even giggled at a slow-motion shot of men’s basketball head coach Jim Boeheim closing his eyes and breathing out in exasperation.Some students were there because they thought Schine would be a good place to go to watch the game with a lot of people. Others went because all the bars were over 21, and they were underage.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyverud, who had been in Chicago for the men’s Elite Eight victory over the University of Virginia, said he was in Schine on Saturday because he had been teaching all day and wanted to be at a public event for the game with students. Syverud spent the entirety of the first half at Schine but left shortly after the half’s end.Two friends at the watch party, Kelsey Thompson and Yazmin Curiel-Ruth, said they were “freaking out” to see “Kent” there.Curiel-Ruth, a freshman communication and rhetorical studies major, said she was “kind of surprised” to see Syverud because she thought he’d be in Houston — the site of the men’s Final Four — but added that he’s the chancellor and likes to make appearances.“It was cool because he’s actually stuck around,” said Thompson, a freshman in the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. “That to me was, it was a nice time to show that he’s not just here to show up and then leave. He’s actually here for and with the students.”Things headed further south for Syracuse when the second half started, as the Orange crept closer to North Carolina’s lead only to be outpaced by the Tar heels.But one SU student said being in the Final Four felt “amazing” after last season, when the men’s basketball team was restricted from post-season play in a series of sanctions by the NCAA.“I feel like I’m in the Final Four, even though they’re playing, I feel like I’m in the Final Four for the team,” he said.On how they’d feel if the Orange lost, the student and his friend agreed: “F*ck yeah, go ‘Cuse.”Other students in Schine seemed to feel similarly, applauding fifth-year senior Michael Gbinije when he fouled out and effectively ended his time on the court as a student athlete. Respectful applause also erupted more than a minute later at the game’s end, with the final score 83-66.Some students let their real feelings shine through, though.“Grandma’s going to go and sleep,” one student said with a sigh, moments after the game ended and students were emptying out of Schine.“Yeah, we’re sad,” her friend replied. “We’re sad.” Commentslast_img read more

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Isis wife and alleged Kayla Mueller jailer Our husbands became like wild

first_imgIslamic State Isis wife and alleged Kayla Mueller jailer: ‘Our husbands became like wild animals’ Share on Pinterest Iraq Fri 31 May 2019 08.00 EDT Martin Chulov in Erbil Kurdish officials believe the introduction of the Yazidi captives angered the senior Isis wives and helped crack the group’s watertight secrecy: “They tried to justify what they were doing [raping the women and girls] through the sharia,” a senior Kurdish intelligence official said. “But, deep down, the wives never forgave them. And that played a part in their downfall.“[Umm Sayyaf] said to Abu Sayyaf: ‘I love you and I don’t want you to be with the Yazidis.’ He said: ‘If you don’t like it, you can leave.’ All that support, and she didn’t mean anything to him. We have used this leverage quite a lot and they have been very useful to us.”Umm Sayyaf said Mueller busied herself with learning while in Shahadah. “She was all the time reading and writing, every time I saw her she was busy with books. When I was cooking, she came to me and said: ‘Teach me what you are doing.’ Abu Sayyaf told her not to ask me any questions. I asked her how they captured her. We used to call her ‘Iman’. Once I asked her what her real name was, and she replied ‘Kayla’.Now on death row, Umm Sayyaf says she last saw Mueller in late 2014, when Baghdadi arrived from Iraq. “He took her with him in a simple car, a Kia. He was driving, and they went to Raqqa.” Three months later, when she and Abu Sayyaf were also in the Syrian city, she saw a news report about Mueller’s death. “I went and asked my husband about it. He looked as shocked as I was.”How Mueller died remains disputed. Isis claims she was killed in an airstrike launched to avenge the public burning to death of a captured Jordanian pilot days earlier. The US government denies a strike took place at the time, and says Isis killed her. The family received three photos of what was purported to be Mueller’s body, in the last of 27 emails they exchanged with the terror group. The fruitless correspondence still stings deeply.“Isis kept indicating that they were willing to release Kayla, but of course there had to be some negotiation and the administration at that time kept sending [clear] messages that they were not interested [in negotiating with Isis],” said Marsha Mueller. “They were not truthful with us, only when their hand was forced by damage control did they tell us what we needed to have known if we were to act effectively on behalf of our Kayla to secure her release and keep her from the horrific torture and suffering she endured.“Can you imagine? Our own government who I trusted completely to help us, who we were given every detail of what we knew, took what we gave them to use, but did not share with us what was happening to our daughter.“We feel that they used Kayla and us simply for their own motives to get Baghdadi and score a political victory. We believe Kayla was taken by al-Baghdadi to rape and torture because it provided a powerful political statement that he, not the US, had the upper hand. Kayla was used differently because she was a high-value political prisoner, but she was still a prisoner – their prisoner – and she suffered in ways we believe were avoidable if the administration in office at that time had been honest with us.”The Muellers also direct criticism at MSF: they say Isis had passed on email details to its staff through which the family could begin negotiations. “But MSF withheld [for several weeks] the information with which Isis had provided them … When we received the address from MSF, within hours we had an email from Isis.”MSF said it withheld the email details out of fear for the safety of other hostages.Two months after Mueller’s apparent death, the US military finally caught up with the Sayyafs, at an oil field about 20 miles (30km) from Shahadah. One of the Yazidis brutalised at their home had made it to Erbil and passed on details of where the couple were staying. “I heard the helicopters, and my husband told me to put on my hijab,” she recalled. “We were going downstairs and they shot him. I was blindfolded and put on the helicopter.”As well as the death sentence, Umm Sayyaf is also facing efforts to transfer her to the US on terrorism charges.The Muellers remain determined to learn the complete truth of their daughter’s captivity, and to secure her legacy. “Kayla wouldn’t want us to be concerned only with what happened to her,” said Marsha Mueller. “The world has to come together and do better by these victims of genocide and terrorism and seek justice not just for the western hostages but for the brutal torture of the Yazidis.” Last modified on Fri 31 May 2019 17.05 EDT Share on Facebook This article is more than 1 month old Kayla Mueller. Photograph: Family Pinterest Share on WhatsApp Share on Messenger Facebook Share on Facebook news At the height of Islamic State’s rule, Umm Sayyaf would regularly prepare her home in eastern Syria to receive her husband’s friend. When the bearded man in the black robe arrived she would make tea and lay a platter of food in a sitting room. Other doors in the sprawling house in the town of Shahadah remained locked; enslaved women and girls from the Yazidi community huddled together in one room, and an American hostage, Kayla Mueller, sat alone in another.The man in the black robe was Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of Isis, and Umm Sayyaf’s husband, Abu Sayyaf – an extremist who had risen through the ranks of the terror group alongside Baghdadi to become one of its top three figures – was the Isis oil minister. She, meanwhile, came from a well-known Iraqi jihadist family: her lineage and spouse earned trust and made her one of the few women to have regular access to the Isis leadership – until the day US commandos came for them in May 2015. This article is more than 1 month old Facebook Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in a picture from 2014. Photograph: AP Share via Email Pinterest In her first interview, Umm Sayyaf paints picture of Isis leaders that supports accounts of their savagery Middle East and North Africa Twitter center_img … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Syria She spoke to the Guardian, partly through a translator, at a prison in Erbil, Iraq, where she has been held since a court in the city sentenced her to death. She was accompanied by a Kurdish intelligence officer who made no attempt to intervene in the interview.Umm Sayyaf also described herself as innocent party, who had no choice but to follow orders. Her self-portrayal is vehemently disputed by Mueller’s parents, Marsha and Carl Mueller, who maintain that Umm Sayyaf was an architect of their daughter’s suffering – a belief they say has been confirmed by accounts of Yazidis who were held captive with her.As Isis swept through eastern and northern Syria from April 2013, subverting communities, killing at will and sending hundreds of thousands fleeing, the group kidnapped up to three dozen foreigners, whose plight was to play out globally over the next two years. Mueller was among them.She had crossed into Syria with a friend to help install internet equipment in an Médecins Sans Frontières-run hospital in Aleppo in August 2013 and had been kidnapped as she was leaving after an overnight stay. For the next 13 months, before being sent to the Sayyafs home, Mueller was transferred to several prisons, one of which was a mill outside of Raqqa where the largest group of foreigners was held.Umm Sayyaf corroborates claims that Mueller, from Prescott in Arizona, was brought to the property in Shadadah by Abu Sayyaf around 24 September 2014. At about the same time, he also brought the Yazidis. “The Yazidi girls changed not only my life, but the lives of all the girls in the Islamic State,” she said from a meeting room inside a counter-terrorism prison in Erbil. “Our husbands became like wild animals when they were around. They had no respect for us.”“But she was treated differently from the Yazidis,” Umm Sayyaf said of Mueller. “There was a budget for her. Pocket money to buy things from the shop. She was a lovely girl and I liked her. She was very respectful and I respected her. One thing I would say is she was very good at hiding her sadness and pain.”Up to 3,000 Yazidi women were enslaved by Isis when its members overran their northern Iraqi communities in August 2014. Many were passed around between Isis members who raped and abused them.Throughout the 90-minute interview, she insisted that Mueller was considered by both herself and her husband to be “better” than the Yazidis. “Baghdadi had told her if you become a Muslim, you will be free. He stayed with us twice in that month. Once he was coming from Raqqa to Iraq, and the second time from Iraq to Raqqa.” She reluctantly admitted that the young American had been “owned” by Baghdadi, but claimed she did not know what that entailed. Shares207207 Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi Since you’re here… Read more Carl and Marsha Mueller hold candles at a memorial for their daughter in 2015. Photograph: Rob Schumacher/AP Share on Twitter Women who fled heavy fighting in the city of Baghuz sit in trucks taking them to a refugee camp for suspected Isis families in February.Photograph: Achilleas Zavallis/The Guardian Islamic State Topics Reuse this content Share on LinkedIn Share via Email Female Isis captive reveals role in helping CIA hunt for Baghdadi Twitter Share on Twitter The stance conflicts with admissions she made in interrogations with her jailers in Erbil and with the FBI, both of whom allege she was tasked with preparing Mueller for whenever Baghdadi arrived. Her claim to have treated Mueller kindly is also at odds with what several Yazidi girls who escaped the home later told Mueller’s parents. According to their accounts, Umm Sayyaf was as brutal and tyrannical with Mueller as she was with them.More than four years after their daughter’s reported death in 2015, the Muellers remain deeply angered by what they believe was a slow and unhelpful response from the Obama administration to their daughter’s situation, which denied them the tools to negotiate with Isis effectively.“What we have learned, we have learned from the brave Yazidis who were held captive with Kayla,” said Marsha Mueller, from the family home in Arizona. “From what we understand Kayla was treated harshly, like the Yazidis and like the western hostages. We learned from the young Yazidi girls held with Kayla that she suffered terribly, but that she tried to hide her own pain. They said Kayla was like a mother or a sister, always trying to protect them and encouraging them that one day they would get home.“They made it sound as if Kayla put herself in harm’s way to protect them and she suffered physical and emotional retaliation for this. They told us … Kayla was writing her family memories and would share them with the girls. Kayla was only with the girls that escaped for approximately six weeks, but they seemed to care deeply for each other. They claimed Kayla as their own and I believe Kayla claimed them as well.” Twitter In the four years since the raid that killed her husband and led to her capture, Umm Sayyaf, 29, otherwise known by her birth name, Nisrine Assad Ibrahim, has been the most important of Isis wives in captivity; a keeper of some of the organisation’s darkest secrets and an alleged participant in some of its most depraved acts.One damning charge has remained central to her infamy: that she acted as jailer and enforcer over Mueller, a humanitarian worker who had been captured by Isis 13 months earlier and was raped by Baghdadi in the Sayyafs’ home. Another is that she enslaved and brutalised nine Yazidi women and girls who had been captured in Iraq and brought to the Isis leaders. Umm Sayyaf has also been charged by the US government with being a party to a terror conspiracy that led to Mueller’s death in Raqqa in February 2015.In her first interview, Umm Sayyaf painted a picture of the Isis leadership that reaffirmed stories told by victims of the group’s savagery. She told of the desperate plight of Yazidis who were brought to the house, how their arrival stirred up animosity between Isis women and their husbands and how Mueller had been seen as both a high value prize for Isis and a personal possession of Baghdadi. Support The Guardian Pinterest Facebook last_img read more

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