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Fans pleased with Bowl win

first_imgStudents celebrated Notre Dame’s 33-17 victory over Miami in the Sun Bowl. “The game was awesome,” senior Fred Jung said. “I had a really great time both at the game and around the city of El Paso.” Most students agreed the best part of the trip was seeing the overflowing support for the football team. “Although my friends and I did not go to the planned Notre Dame festivities, it was incredible to see the amount of Notre Dame supporters just at the tailgating scene,” Jung said. For senior Silvana Martinez and sophomore Walter Myers, both of whom are El Paso residents, the Sun Bowl was a unique opportunity for them to experience a major Notre Dame event in their hometown. “The whole weekend was great,” Martinez said. “There was a huge turnout of not only Notre Dame students, but also locals who embraced our school and became supporters. “One of the best parts about the game was the fact that all of the cheers and traditions associated with the student section at Notre Dame Stadium were brought to Sun Bowl Stadium. It was awesome to see students doing push-ups after Notre Dame scores.” Myers agreed with his fellow El Pasoan. “I have never seen this much hype surrounding the Sun Bowl. It was amazing,” he said. As a member of the Notre Dame Club of El Paso, Myers helped in the preparation for the game itself and the activities surrounding it. “We organized a canned food drive for a local homeless shelter, and anyone who brought a can was given ‘The Shirt,’” he said. “We also organized the battle of the bands event inside the El Paso Convention Center and the pep rally, which was unfortunately cancelled due to inclement weather.” The irony of the title of “Sun Bowl” was evident, as the kickoff temperature was 34 degrees and snow was on the ground. For many students, the weather was the sole letdown of the weekend. “I was expecting warm weather, so the sweatshirt and jeans I wore on game day were definitely not enough,” Jung said. “It felt like South Bend,” Martinez said. “I do not think any of us were expecting as much snow as we got.” Despite the weather, the Irish victory and time spent with friends over the New Year’s weekend made the Sun Bowl experience one to remember. “I think the best part of my weekend was seeing all of my school friends and having them meet my home friends,” Martinez said. “When I found out Notre Dame would be playing in the Sun Bowl, I was ecstatic because I knew my last Notre Dame football game as a student would be in my hometown. It was a great last hurrah.” “El Paso did a great job of keeping the environment both hospitable and safe,” Myers said. “I’m really proud of both my city and school.”last_img read more

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Sodexo provides food for local charities

first_imgThough most Saint Mary’s students turn to dining service Sodexo for their daily physical nourishment, the company also takes time to work with students to nourish the bodies of those less fortunate in the local South Bend community. Sodexo makes a point of helping and encouraging students to reach out and support local and school-run charities, General Manager Barry Bowles said. Yet the community of Saint Mary’s students, not the company, powers much of this goodwill. “Most of the time, it’s not Sodexo that gives to charities ⎯ it’s the students,” Bowles said. “For example, the students will give away a meal swipe to help raise money for starving children in Africa.” Sodexo often has food left over that the staff would rather give to charities than throw away, he said. When students leave on holiday or when the food does not get eaten, Sodexo will transport it to local charities such as the homeless shelter in South Bend. “Students come to me all the time, asking if I can help contribute food to their charity,” Bowles said. “Dance Marathon and Belles for Africa are two charities Sodexo supports.” Sodexo contributes food to Dance Marathon, and oftentimes a large share of that food is leftover at the end of the night, Bowles said. In this case, Sodexo will pick-up the food and transport it to the homeless shelter as a donation in Dance Marathon’s name. “The students do all the work. All we are doing is dropping the food off,” Bowles said. “Does Sodexo do a lot of work? Yes, but overall the students do the majority of work.” Sodexo consistently contributes large donations to Red Cross, Hands Across America and other charities. However, Sodexo likes to support student efforts and student charities above anything else. “How can we help students?” Bowles said. “What can we do to help their charitable givings? That is what Sodexo aims to do.” Two times throughout the year, Sodexo donates a significant amount of food to the South Bend Center for the Homeless. These donations are given during fall break and winter break. “When the students leave for break, the food just sits in the coolers and the perishable items go to waste,” he said. “To prevent this from happening over long breaks, we take the food and give it to people who are actually going to use it.” The dining company may be a separate entity from the College, but Bowles said the group is considered part of the school. “We have been here for 56 years,” Bowles said. “When we do things like this, we want it to be known that Saint Mary’s is the overall contributor to the community. In essence, it’s not really Sodexo. It’s Saint Mary’s and it’s the students.”last_img read more

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Students devote summer to service

first_imgA number of Notre Dame students spent their summers not sitting by the pool but serving around the country in the Summer Service Learning Program (SSLP) through the Center for Social Concerns (CSC). The SSLP program assigns students to “multiple agencies across the United States, reaching out in multiple ways to people in need,” according to the CSC website. Sophomore Will Raaf said he worked with the homeless during his SSLP experience at the Hesed House in Aurora, Ill. “During the day, [the other volunteers and I] moved the entire homeless shelter across the street to accommodate shelter renovations that were in progress,” Raaf said.  “At night, we spoke with the guests, served them food and prepared them for bed.” As he volunteered close to his hometown, Raaf said the SSLP experience was transformative for him. “I grew restless as a result of my SSLP experience,” he said.  “After experiencing poverty in an area only 20 minutes from my home, my eyes were opened to the immediacy of poverty.” Part of Raaf’s work was to assist with programs for resident development at the Hesed House, a resource center and shelter dedicated to ending homelessness, sponsored programs for resident development. “I participated in a morning running club three times a week [with the residents of the Hesed House],” Raaf said.  “The opportunity to do so was a pleasant surprise that extended the SSLP experience in an impactful way.” Sophomore Holly O’Hara said she assisted women and children in a variety of ways throughout her two-month stint at the Shalom House in Harrisburg, Pa. “I worked as a summer intern, so I worked on whatever the daily manager needed done on a specific day,” O’Hara said.  “On one occasion, I painted a fence around the house, and on another day I escorted the children who were living in the house to the park to play.” O’Hara said shared meals allowed her to cultivate relationships with the women she lived with at the Shalom House. “Every night [at the Shalom House,] a different woman takes a turn in making dinner for everyone living within the household,” she said. “Dinners were a great opportunity to get to know everyone.” O’Hara said her time with the women and children at the Shalom House shaped her future plans. “This school year I will apply for the spring mission trip to Appalachia and also try to volunteer at the Center for the Homeless once a week,” she said.  “I am also planning on applying for an [International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP)] for next summer in Nepal.” Sophomore Peter Hall said interaction with volunteers and residents within the service location was a large part of his SSLP experience at De La Salle Middle School in St. Louis,iMo. “I lived in an on-site house called the Claver House, which housed a group of people who lived together and whose goal is to grow in their faith while they do work in the community,” he said.  “After sharing a house with seven people, I developed close friendships with everyone in the household.” Hall said his volunteer experience broadened his worldview. “I have much more awareness of the social problems within the United States after my work with middle school students in St. Louis,” he said.  “It forced me out of my bubble.” Hall said he would highly encourage any Notre Dame student to apply for an SSLP or ISSLP for next summer. “My SSLP was a fantastic experience, and I believe that anyone else at Notre Dame who is considering applying for the program definitely should,” he said.  “It was one of the best experiences of my life.”last_img read more

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Physicists study Higgs boson

first_imgResearchers from a global collaboration, including Notre Dame faculty and students, presented findings further characterizing the recently-documented Higgs boson on Thursday in La Thuile, Italy. Physics professor Colin Jessop, one of the researchers, called the findings “the biggest discovery of particle physics for the past 50 years.” “We can say with some surety now that the particle that we observed is the Higgs boson, or what some people call the ‘God particle,’” Jessop said. The Higgs boson is a particle created in the high-impact, high-energy collision of protons at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland. CERN is the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Jessop said all objects gain their property of mass through interaction with the Higgs field. “If you create enough energy to interact with this field, you’ll make what’s called a Higgs boson, a particle that is kind of the smoking gun that there’s a Higgs field there,” Jessop said. Jessop said researchers now can confirm that the experimental particle’s basic characteristics, including spin and parity, match those of the theoretical Higgs boson. “In the last six months, we’ve been taking two-and-a-half times more data since July,” he said. ” and the results that we presented [in Italy] were evidence that the particle we discovered behaves exactly as we thought it was going to.” Jessop said the team confirmed the experimental Higgs boson interacts with fermions, the essential components of matter, the way it theoretically should. Until now, Jessop said researchers had not observed interactions between the Higgs boson and fermions. “It’s supposed to interact with everything – that’s how it gives mass,” he said. “So, if there were a set of particles it didn’t interact with, then it wouldn’t have been the Higgs boson we thought it was. … We showed that the Higgs boson interacts with all the particles we thought it should.” Jessop said the findings support evidence scientists in the(Compact Muon Solenoi) Collaboration,nwhich includeg the Notre Dame team, gathered last year that suggesg the existence of the Higgs boson “We started seeing the hints of this about a year ago at this time,” Jessop said. “we started to see some evidence, but not conclusive.”Then the signals got stronger and stronger, and in July we had a big announcement that we had observed something that looked like a Higgs boson, but we weren’t absolutely sure.” Jessop said building accelerators able to supplh enough energy for the proton collision has been the keynobstacle to finding the Higgs boson. “We’ve been looking to try to make one of these Higgs bosons by putting more and more energy into it … but we haven’t been able, as it turns out, to get to sufficient energy until just recently.” Jessop said.  Notre Dame sends postdoctoral researchers and graduate students to the LHC for a hands-on experience, Jessop said. “All the people who do the hard work really are the young people, the graduate students and the [post-doctorate studentss,” he said. Postdoctoral research associatr Jeff Kolb said he and graduate students Nil Valls and Doug Berry spent time living in Europe, not just writing computer codes to analyze data, but alsokworking on the experiment’s equipment. In order to be listed as an author, Kolb said students must word for a year on something other than data analysis, among other requirements. Valls said looking for evidence of the Higgs boson was the chief difficulty in analyzing the 20 petabytes (the equivalent of 20 million gigabytes) of data per year.scientists produce at the LHC. “It’s like looking for a needle in a haystack,” Valls said. “Writing code is inevitable, for grad students at least, because that is the best way to sort of look for those needles.” Jessop said Higgs research continues despite the temporary halt of collisions at the LHC to allow upgrades meant to double the energy of the accelerator. Data collections will resume in 2016 and continue througo 2020, he said. the Notre Dame team will continue working to improve the Higgs detector for the program’s second phase from 2023 to 2035. “At the new energy there is a good possibility of further new discoveries in addition to continuing to study the Higgs in detail,” Jessop said. …We’ve had a giant success, but for us it’s kind of a beginning.”last_img read more

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Notre Dame disallows large bags in stadium

first_imgIn time for the football season opener tomorrow, the University updated its policy on bags in Notre Dame Stadium, director of Game Day Operations Michael Seamon said. The new policy states large bags, including backpacks, duffels and tote bags, are not allowed in the stadium, Seamon said.  “Any smaller purses or bags that are brought will be inspected at the entrance to the stadium, just as they have always been,” Seamon said.  Seamon said a review of the bag policy was planned after the conclusion of last football season. “Then Boston happened,” he said, referencing the bombings at the Boston Marathon on April 15, when bombs were hidden in backpacks.  Seamon said Game Day Operations consulted with peer institutions and the National Football League, which updated its own bag policy for the 2013 football season, when creating Notre Dame’s new policy.  “The new policy was announced at the end of July, and we’ve sent notices to all ticketholders,” he said.  Seamon said the new policy has been well received.  “We’ve seen an increase in security across the country,” he said. “People realize we are doing this for your safety.” Fans who visit the Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore before the game can carry their purchases into the stadium in the bookstore’s clear plastic bags, Seamon said.  Phil Johnson, director of Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP), said NDSP encourages all students and fans to help maintain a safe game day environment.  “If you see something suspicious, say something,” Johnson said. “We rely on fans to look out for each other, and that really distinguishes the Notre Dame community.”  Johnson said NDSP coordinates with local and state police to ensure the safety of people on campus during game days.  “We have a robust security plan,” he said. “We want to implement it without detracting from the fan experience.” Because of the extreme heat expected for this Saturday, Seamon said Game Day Operations encourages fans to stay hydrated and cool.  “We will have a misting station outside of Gate A, similar to what you’d find at a marathon,” he said.  Additionally, Seamon said there is an evacuation plan in place in the event of inclement weather.  “People will be asked to go into concourses or in buildings surrounding the stadium,” Seamon said. “We will use the intercom system to communicate to fans the time the game will resume.”  Contact Catherine Owers at cowers@nd.edulast_img read more

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Support A Belle, Love A Belle week begins at SMC

first_imgSara Shoemake In order to raise awareness of mental health issues, such as ADD/ADHD, depression, eating disorders, anxiety and addiction, Saint Mary’s will host a series of events throughout the week deemed “Support A Belle, Love A Belle (SABLAB).” The week is sponsored by the Saint Mary’s community in collaboration with Notre Dame’s Irish State of Mind week.Senior and co-chair of the student government association’s (SGA) social concerns committee Chloe Deranek said this year’s theme is hope, a result of the committee’s finding that in most cases of mental health the factor that pushes people toward suicide is feelings of hopelessness. “Throughout our week, we will be promoting hope with the hashtag #BellesForHope and trying our very best to show each and every Belle that everyone here supports and loves her, and maybe that fact can bring her hope,” Deranek said. “This year’s SABLAB is a little different in that we are trying to branch out more and cover not only mental health, but sexual violence, through collaborations with BAVO [Belles Against Violence Office], and other mental issues like addiction and ADD/ADHD.”Deranek said the main goals of the week are to spread awareness and statistics about mental health issues, to combat stigmas, to show the students the available resources for mental health and to bring the College’s community together to act as a symbol of support and love.Kaitlyn Tarullo, a senior and co-chair of SGA’s social concerns committee, said the week kicked off Sunday evening with a movie event called “Sundaes on Sunday,” a common gathering hosted by the Student Activities Board (SAB). Attendees watched “Silver Linings Playbook,” which Tarullo said was an excellent choice in beginning an ongoing conversation about mental health for the rest of the week.For Monday’s event the SABLAB committee planned glowstick Zumba on the Library Green, an activity where students will wear glow stick necklaces and bracelets as they come together for a healthy, stress-relieving work-out, Tarullo said.Tuesday’s event is a student panel called “Share Your Story,” where eight students will recall their own present and past struggles with mental health, Deranek said.“[The student panel] is a very important event to us,” she said. “We really feel that it helps to de-stigmatize mental health by putting a face to the issue, and it also shows girls that they are not alone in their suffering – that things can get better, for support, love and help are always here for them.” On Wednesday at 7 p.m., students will gather to decorate paper bag votives in Reignbeaux Lounge, and they will then line the lanterns down The Avenue as they walk to the Grotto for a healing mass.“The lanterns will be made to represent those who suffer from mental health in college and will be a powerful visual of the loss that can occur,” Deranek said. “The walk to the Grotto will also serve as a sign of the community that we have here supporting our Belles.”Thursday will include a lecture given by Tom Seeberg, the father of the late Lizzy Seeberg and former Saint Mary’s student, titled “Believe: Giving Witness to Hope,” Tarullo said.“While the student panel holds a special place in my heart, I am extremely excited for Tom Seeberg to speak to our students about his journey after the mental health struggles of his daughter, Lizzy,” Tarullo said. “Lizzy continues to be a large inspiration behind the events of SABLAB and reminds us how real these issues are on college campuses, especially our own. “As the theme of our week is centered around hope, Mr. Seeberg is a great source of how important hope is in persevering through mental illnesses.”Deranek agreed, saying she and the rest of the social concerns committee are honored Tom Seeberg accepted their invitation to speak, as he has a powerful message to share with the community.Other events taking place throughout the week include daily tables set up in the Noble Family Dining Hall during lunch. The tables will list statistics and define the mental health issues of ADD/ADHD, depression, eating disorders, anxiety and addiction, Deranek said.BAVO will also host a lunch discussion about advocation against sexual assault, she said.“This is important to us because as BAVO says, ‘one is too many,’” Deranek said. “No one should have to cope with sexual assault, and we wholeheartedly support advocation for talking about ways to prevent this as well as what to do in the aftermath. We will specifically focus the discussion on how to recognize that something may have happened to a friend and how to be a source for her.”Tarullo said the preparation for this week started in June, and her committee members each have personal motives for helping the cause. In collaboration with all the Belles involved and the Notre Dame “Irish State of Mind” events, she said she knows the week will be a great success.“This week provides many outlets for girls who experience these issues in their own individual way, and I hope this week inspires hope to all who need it most,” Tarullo said.Tags: love a belle, Mental health, mental health awareness, mental health issues, SABLAB, support a belle, support a belle love a bellelast_img read more

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‘Think Pink Week’ funds cancer research

first_imgThis Thursday, the ladies of Breen-Phillips Hall (BP) are employing the help of an in-demand item on campus to encourage the Notre Dame community to support breast cancer research: fresh berries. “We wanted to have a 5K that was different from any of the other ones on campus, and berries are a hot commodity at Notre Dame since they often aren’t in the dining halls, so we saw that as a way to draw people in,” Breen-Phillips’ vice president and junior Laura Luchini said. The 5K run is just one of many events BP is hosting for their inaugural Think Pink Week, which will fundraise for Harper Cancer Research Institute. The race is set to take place Thursday at 5 p.m. at Fieldhouse Mall, where PacSun apparel, berries and other free food will be available for registered race participants. “We knew that there were other 5Ks going on around that week, so we wanted to stand out,” Luchini said.“We noticed that there isn’t any kind of breast cancer awareness week at Notre Dame like there is at most other colleges. … With all of the cancer research happening on campus at Harper Research Institute, and with Breen-Phillips’ color being pink, we thought it was more than fitting that we start this new week.”The week kicked off on Monday with “Kiss Away Cancer,” where students and faculty were invited to sign banners outside of DeBartolo Hall and North and South Dining Halls and to pick up a ribbon, pink lemonade and Hershey’s Kisses distributed by BP residents.“This is a cause that is important to me and many other people on campus, so it is amazing to be doing something that can help,” Luchini said. Tuesday night from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Breen-Phillips will host the first of two profit-share fundraisers with Blaze Pizza on Eddy Street, Luchini said, where a portion of sales that evening will be donated to the Harper Cancer Research Institute. “All of the money that we raise is going to Harper Cancer Research Institute here on campus. Harper does a lot of cutting-edge research right across the street, and yet a lot of people don’t know what it is,” she said. Luchini said she hopes to raise awareness about this research by hosting a talk given by representatives from the Institute on Wednesday night in DeBartolo Hall. “The Institute will be giving a talk of the cancer research that’s happening right here on campus and how you can get involved,” Luchini said. “I’m sure we all know of at least one person affected by breast cancer. It is so prevalent, and we thought it was important to remind Notre Dame’s campus how important cancer research is in finding a cure.”The week wraps up with the 5K on Thursday in addition to an all-day profit-share fundraiser with Five Guys on Eddy Street. “We wanted to plan a fun, informative week for our students. All of the money that we raise is going to Harper Cancer Research Institute here on campus, and we want to raise awareness for Harper and give them the opportunity to tell students how to get involved in research there,” Luchini said. Tags: breast cancer awareness, Breen-Phillips, Harper Cancer Research Institutelast_img read more

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SUB movie committee brings award-winning films to campus

first_imgThough many students associate room 101 in DeBartolo Hall with large classes such as chemistry or biology, the lecture hall becomes a movie theater on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights with the help of the Student Union Board’s (SUB) movie committee members.Junior Daniel Riley heads the committee, which is comprised of dorm representatives and student SUB members. In total, the ten committee members work with graphic designers and a publicity team to bring 10 movies to campus each semester.The committee members work on the movie lineups for half a semester at a time, ensuring they will have access to the movies, since release dates often change. To pick the movies, Riley said the committee members first peruse the list of available films from two third-party sites that deal directly with movie production companies for the rights to a film, which organizations can then rent. Then the committee members who have seen the films give input about the movies on the list.“We find out which ones are the popular ones that we think the majority of the student body would like, as well as maybe some of the hidden gems that we think are worth showing that maybe there’s not a huge following for,” Riley said.The committee members also look for movies from a variety of genres, Riley said.“We do search for a little bit of diversity,” he said. “We try to get one family movie in [during a half semester period] … We don’t want it to be all comedy or all drama.”Once the committee members have made their selections, Riley emails his contacts at the sites. The committee gets the movies either through a pre-released DVD or downloading and streaming from a router box, and must return the movies when they are finished with them.“Because we are a college campus, we do get a bit of an advanced screening on it,” he said. “For example, ‘La La Land’ — my guess is it won’t be out on DVD for another month or so, at the earliest. … You actually get to see them before you would have the access on pay-per-view, Netflix, DVD, things like that.”While attendance varies with different movies, Riley said a weekend’s showings will typically average between 100 and 300 people, although “Moana” attracted over 600 people. Riley said most people attend the 8 p.m. showings on Fridays or Saturdays.Because bringing the movies to campus is not free, the committee uses its budget and revenue from people who attend the movie to fund the movie nights. While the committee can cover all costs with some movies, Riley said, it takes a loss on others.One such film, “Hunt for the Wilderpeople,” is Riley’s favorite film of the ones he has brought to campus. Riley called the film a “special gem,” and said while the attendance for the film was small, the people who saw it enjoyed it.“We don’t make all our money back from the cost of renting a movie like that, but it does make me very happy [to see] how the student body gets excited for it as well,” he said.The rest of this semester’s SUB movie lineup features Academy Award-nominated films “Hidden Figures,” “Moonlight” and “Fences,” as well as “The Lego Batman Movie.” The committee will also be showing “The Breakfast Club” for AnTostal week.Students who are interested in following the movies on campus for a given week can email Riley at driley2@nd.edu to be added to the movie email list. Riley said the email list has over 150 members, and members receive information about the schedule and special movie promotions.Tags: movie nights, Student Union Board, SUB movieslast_img read more

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Hoping to receive $51.5 million, Saint Mary’s launches a multi-year series of updates

first_imgSaint Mary’s began a major multi-year series of facilities updates this summer, spending over $2.5 million in the months leading up to fall semester. These renovations were made possible after the Board of Trustees designated up to $3 million to be added to the current fiscal year’s capital budget, vice president for strategy and finance Dana Strait said.The College also has approval to issue a bond of up to $51.5 million, with almost $20 million to be used to re-finance existing debt at a lower rate, Strait said.“This is really just the beginning of what the College is putting forward for a two to three-year improvement plan,” Strait said. “We received resounding support from the board earlier this summer for making some improvements in campus spaces with a focus on improving existing buildings and the environment. … It’s really time to focus on tending to those buildings that are beautiful, historical parts of our campus and really emblematic of who we are – think LeMans Hall, Holy Cross Hall – but that really need some love.”Strait said much of the work completed this summer is deferred maintenance accrued over the years, and will go largely unseen.“So things like sewage ejector pumps, drainage, gutters and roofing repairs … things very typical to maintaining buildings like ours,” she said.Other updates, such as aesthetic enhancements made to key academic and student spaces, will be extremely visible to students returning to campus, Strait said. Cushwa-Leighton library is currently undergoing major renovations, with special attention paid to creating useful and accessible student spaces that cater to all needs, she said.“The librarians are currently hard at work clearing out the journal space that used to be adjacent to Trumper, and by fall break they will have half of those journals removed,” Strait said. “… Group study spaces and single study spaces will be installed throughout that space to provide our students with 24/7-hour study spaces. We’re very excited about that.”To facilitate true 24-hour accessibility, even in the winter months, the tunnels leading from LeMans Hall to the library will be re-opened, Strait said.“We also have to ensure that they’re accessible, so that students who are in wheelchairs or who need a little bit more physical assistance … [are able] to get through,” Strait said. “So, part of opening that tunnel this fall will involve installing accessibility ramps so that they can really be used by all students.”Additionally, Sodexo services has provided an automated Starbucks coffee machine for the front of the library, Strait said.“It’s no longer that free coffee machine that used to be there, but it’s good coffee,” Strait said. “And as an alternative, we’ll still be providing that free coffee on the lower level in Trumper. We really wanted to meet that desire for higher quality drinks, while also providing open access coffee for those who don’t want to use their munch money or their credit card.”Strait said student perspectives will play a large role in future facilities updates.“In terms of a plan moving forward, when the College makes decisions about big projects, it’s always made as a community,” she said. “So this fall, I will be hosting the facilities town halls to provide faculty, staff, administration and … students with opportunities to share with us what they would like to see happen.”The updates made to academic buildings and recreational spaces have been made with changing student needs and preferences in mind, Strait said.“We need to be able to make sure that we’re meeting those interests with state-of-the-art facilities,” Strait said. “So, keeping pace with that instead of falling behind.”Tags: debt, LeMans Hall, renovations, updateslast_img read more

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Some student groups begin meeting in person

first_imgIverson Sun | The Observer The Notre Dame Cycling Club received an exemption from SAO to have in-person workouts.If the Cycling Club has more than 10 members, it cannot congregate at all once. SAO rules only permit a maximum of 10 people pods to train together at once while wearing masks.The Triathlon Club has also made adjustments to its in-person practices. First year, member Sam Vanstraten said the club has pods that rotate where they meet to train.“For practices, we have two pods that practice at different times for indoor practices,” Vanstraten said. “This has allowed us to space out when we practice on stationary bikes in the Smith Center or swimming at Rockne. When we practice outside, we are able to run in smaller groups that are spaced us as not to put ourselves at risk.”The smaller groups have allowed the team to build community, he said.“The pods have been really great for practice because it has created a smaller, more intimate community that meets often,” Vanstraten said. “I believe that the precautions that are being taken for COVID-19 have really increased the camaraderie within the club.”Many academic clubs are taking different approaches in light of the pandemic. Sophomore Hanjing Zhu, the project leader for the Microsoft Corporation at the Student Business International Council (SIBC) said her group is following a hybrid model.“While some project groups are meeting in person for their weekly meetings, I have conducted most of them on Zoom due to accessibility and safety,” Zhu said. “However, I intend to go in-person after travel-team selections conclude the following week.”While some clubs are aware of the option to meet in person, a few clubs like The Juggler, are either not sure or hesitant to continue with in-person events.“I’m actually not sure where SAO stands, which is why I’ve just been meeting on Zoom for the Juggler,” said senior William LaMarra, the head of the Juggler, the University’s literary magazine.While COVID-19 changes have made this year different, many like sophomore Jerome Gan, are cautiously optimistic.“We just had our first Asian American Association (AAA) meeting two weeks ago at Bond Quad. Everyone stayed socially distant, and these meetings seem to be working more effectively than Zoom,” Gan said. “I hope that we continue this and stay safe until the end of the semester.”Editor’s Note: An earlier version of this article stated SAO recently changed its guidelines to allow some student groups to begin meeting in person. These guidelines were only different during the University’s two-week period of remote instruction; otherwise, the SAO guidelines have not changed. The Observer regrets this error.Tags: clubs, COVID-19, fall 2020, HERE guidelines, SAO Since the start of the fall semester, Notre Dame set many new health and safety guidelines, limiting the capacities and spaces for student meetings. Following these regulations, the Students Activities Office (SAO) reworked meeting guidelines and suspended most activities that would hold significant risk for transmission of COVID-19 during the two-week pause of in-person instructions and activities.However, in light of the decrease in positive cases of the coronavirus, SAO has permitted all clubs, as it has done ever since the first day of classes, to congregate in person, given that attendance is taken at all in-person meeting and events to allow for contact tracing if necessary. Campus groups are approaching these guidelines differently.Sophomore David Campos, a member of the Notre Dame Cycling Club, said allowing members to have organized practices that follow COVID guidelines uplifted the general attitude of the club.“By training in closer proximity, we have increased the training productivity and distance that each rider could go during training rides,” Campos said. “By allowing more experienced riders to pair up with newer members while staying socially distanced, we could hone technique and fitness early before tentative races in the spring.”last_img read more

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